Texas Red

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Michael Hoffman
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RE: Texas Red 2010/07/15 10:50:16 (permalink)
boyardee65 

  p.p.s. The correct spelling for chile is "chile!" Not Chili!"







Actually, chile is the correct spelling for the pepper. Chili is the correct spelling for the dish.
#31
PapaJoe8
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RE: Texas Red 2010/07/15 14:40:12 (permalink)
Right as always FoodB, I meant celery salt, or celery seeds, or Old Bay, or???

Michael, you gave me an idea. The there is a huge opportunity for someone to come out w/ "celery seasoning"!!! Maybe if we got in touch w/ ??? McCormic ?

A famous Texas chili dish, served for many years in Dallas, and at the State Fair of Texas, was... Shanghai Jimmy's Chili Rice. It included chopped celery as an optional topping. The actual recipe for Jimmy's chili is still a secret. :~(

Point is, chili and celery got together like, As Forrest Gump would say ""like peas and carrots".
Joe

Edot; Michael, after doing your link it now looks like there IS a celery seasoning. Why did you say there was no such thing? Anyway, I still think McCormic should make it so folks can get it, to put in their chili, at the grocery. Think we could weezle out a small % of tha profits?
post edited by PapaJoe8 - 2010/07/15 14:49:05
#32
Michael Hoffman
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RE: Texas Red 2010/07/15 14:59:35 (permalink)
I said it as a joke.
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Foodbme
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RE: Texas Red 2010/07/15 15:41:29 (permalink)
Michael Hoffman

boyardee65 

  p.p.s. The correct spelling for chile is "chile!" Not Chili!"







Actually, chile is the correct spelling for the pepper. Chili is the correct spelling for the dish.


Once again, you are correct Sir! (Damn, I hate it when your correct)
#34
Michael Hoffman
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RE: Texas Red 2010/07/15 15:46:37 (permalink)
I'm always correct. You must have a lot of hate time racked up.
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PapaJoe8
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RE: Texas Red 2010/07/15 16:03:22 (permalink)
I thought I was wrong once but... I ended up being mistaken.

Another famous Texas chili is Benny Binion's. For many years a BIG sign on the outside of the Horseshoe Casino in downtown Las Vegas said "Real Texas Chili" and it was.
Joe
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boyardee65
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RE: Texas Red 2010/07/16 04:48:05 (permalink)
  Thank you Mr. Hoffman for the clarification.

  Old bay seasoning is very heavy on celery seed so I would consider it to be celery seasoning. I use it for a lot of things but NOT Chili!

  JMHO

  David O.
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zimm3839
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RE: Texas Red 2010/07/19 12:26:03 (permalink)
Tiki has it right. True texas chili has no beans or tomtoe sauce.....
#38
Foodbme
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RE: Texas Red 2010/07/19 14:47:46 (permalink)
PapaJoe8

I thought I was wrong once but... I ended up being mistaken.

Another famous Texas chili is Benny Binion's. For many years a BIG sign on the outside of the Horseshoe Casino in downtown Las Vegas said "Real Texas Chili" and it was.
Joe


PJ8'
I know you've been on a quest to find the Holy Grail of Chili Recipes, i.e. Benny Binions & Shanghai Jimmies because I've seen your name on many other Chili related sites. Have you found them yet???
 
That Benny Binion was some kind of character!!" /> I read his Bio---Horse Trader, Bootlegger, Gangster, Gambler, Murderer. Lived life over the edge! http://www.1st100.com/part2/binion.html
post edited by Foodbme - 2010/07/19 14:54:46
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PapaJoe8
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RE: Texas Red 2010/07/20 09:58:54 (permalink)
FoodB, my quest for, and help with Benny Binions chili recipe is recorded in a thread right here at Roadfood.

There is also a great thread here, started by BornInOKC, about Shanghai Jimmy and his famous Chili Rice. No one can quite agree on how to make Jimmy's chili so we all just make what tastes like we remember. There are a few things we know for sure but many things we must just make our best guess at.

And yes Benny Binion was quite a character. And he DID make, and love, a great bowl of Texas Chili.

Shanghai Jimmy was also quite a character. Or should I say he had allot of character. There is quite a bit of info about him on the net thanks to many who did allot of digging it up.

Here is a question;
I bought a book, about 40 years ago, with recipes for most famous Texas chili recipes. I tried making every recipe in there. Now I have misplaced this book. I think it was the first written about Texas Chili.  Anyone know about this book?
Joe
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Foodbme
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RE: Texas Red 2010/07/20 10:06:44 (permalink)
FoodB, my quest for, and help with Benny Binions chili recipe is recorded in a thread right here at Roadfood.

Which Thread? Please point me in the right direction!
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MiamiDon
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Foodbme
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Michael Hoffman
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RE: Texas Red 2010/07/20 11:12:06 (permalink)
[quote

Here is a question;
I bought a book, about 40 years ago, with recipes for most famous Texas chili recipes. I tried making every recipe in there. Now I have misplaced this book. I think it was the first written about Texas Chili.  Anyone know about this book?
Joe

I don't. But, how about this?
 
The Ultimate Chili Cookbook
by W. C. Jameson, Republic of Texas Press
 
http://texana.texascooking.com/books/99aug_edchoice1.htm
 
Of course there's this:
 
Frank X. Tolbert's Original Texas Chili
 
2 to 4 ancho chiles, 4-8 small dried red chiles or 2 to 4 tablespoons chili powder
4 tablespoons vegetable oil
3 pounds lean beef chuck, cut in bite-sized pieces
1 to 2 cups beef stock or water
1/3 cup finely chopped garlic
1 yellow onion, finely chopped
2 tablespoons ground cumin
1 tablespoon ground oregano
salt
1/2 cup Hungarian sweet paprika
1 or 2 fresh cilantro sprigs
 
If using chiles, trim the stems and remove seeds. Place in a small saucepan and add water to barely cover. Bring to a boil, remove from the heat, cover and let stand for 15 minutes. Transfer the chiles and their soaking water to a blender or a food processor fitted with metal blade. Purée until smooth. Set aside.
Brown half of the meat in a large skillet in the vegetable oil over high heat for 6 to 8 minutes. Transfer the meat and juices to a heavy pot and add the puréed chiles or chili powder, if using. Place over low heat and bring to a simmer. Meanwhile, brown the remaining beef in the same manner, then transfer it and the juices to the pot. Add enough stock or water to just cover the meat. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat to low and simmer, uncovered, for 30 minutes.
 
Add the garlic, onion, cumin, oregano, salt to taste, paprika and cilantro and continue to simmer, uncovered, stirring occasionally, until the meat is very tender, another 30 minutes. Add a little liquid if the mixture begins to stick or looks too dry. When the chili is ready, using a large kitchen spoon, skim any fat from the surface. Ladle into bowls and serve. Makes 4 to 6 servings.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Note: There is an easy way to remove excess fat from this or any dish, but you have to make it ahead of time. Let the chili cool, then refrigerate it for several hours or overnight. The excess fat will harden on the surface and be easy to remove. Then, reheat to serving temperature.



#44
zimm3839
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RE: Texas Red 2010/07/20 11:23:19 (permalink)
Michael, Very good book. My local library carries this book. Excellent read. Some very good recipes....
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Foodbme
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RE: Texas Red 2010/07/20 11:57:00 (permalink)
Note: There is an easy way to remove excess fat from this or any dish, but you have to make it ahead of time. Let the chili cool, then refrigerate it for several hours or overnight. The excess fat will harden on the surface and be easy to remove. Then, reheat to serving temperature.

Here's a little trick I figured out. When the chili is done, turn off the heat and let it settle for a few minutes to allow the grease to rise to the top. Lay some sheets of paper towel on the grease and let them absorb it. Repeat as often as you like to leave whatever amount of grease suits your taste. Saves time chilling and reheating and you don't need to make it ahead of time. No charge for this tidbit!  
#46
PapaJoe8
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RE: Texas Red 2010/07/21 11:39:44 (permalink)
Michael, that looks like a great book. It was published in 1999 though. Not the book I had. It was in the 70s when I cooked those recipes. If I remember right they were all Texas recipes.

FoodB, yes Benny was a character! My parents gave he and his wife dancing lessons when they lived in Dallas. Benny could be found most mornings at a corner booth at the Horseshoe coffee shop. I had a few bowls of chili for breakfast with him. He told me his main job at the Horseshoe was to make sure the chili was made right.

And, nice degreasing tip!

An idea I got here, from a thread about Joe Rogers chili, was to degrease chili and offer the grease as an added option. Hey, some folks like tha grease and some folks don't. To do this I refrigerated the chili to degrease it.  And, chili gets better after a time in the fridge anyway.

Oh, I have never actually cooked Benny's chili. I ended up w/ my own version. I never used the Japanese chiles or the kidney suitt.

I also ended up w/ my own version of Shanghai Jimmy's Chili Rice. I guess I should post it in the thread here about Jimmy when I have time.
Joe
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sw2geeks
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RE: Texas Red 2012/02/07 15:41:12 (permalink)
EdSails

Masa harina is a mexican-style corn meal. It's what is used to make tamales with. You should be able to find it with the other cornmeal-type products.

You can also use crushed corn tortillas chips or corn tortillas; they contain the same masa harina flour.
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partyallnight
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RE: Texas Red 2012/11/01 08:30:34 (permalink)
Bushie

tiki's recipe is real Texas chili.

I give it my blessing. Amen.

Looks delicious but i am fan of Sherrif Blaylocks Chili ....
#49
scrumptiouschef
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RE: Texas Red 2012/11/09 21:41:01 (permalink)
This year at Terlingua:
 
1st Place - Ted Hume, III from Dallas, TX
2nd Place - Dave Lazarus, Killeen, TX
3rd Place - Dwight Hamilton, Rockne, T
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RE: Texas Red 2012/11/09 22:10:12 (permalink)
sw2geeks

EdSails

Masa harina is a mexican-style corn meal. It's what is used to make tamales with. You should be able to find it with the other cornmeal-type products.

You can also use crushed corn tortillas chips or corn tortillas; they contain the same masa harina flour.

 
I know in Dallas, (and probably all of Texas) Masa Harina is available everywhere! 
#51
scrumptiouschef
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RE: Texas Red 2012/12/23 11:06:19 (permalink)
http://www.roadfood.com/F...Red-Chili-m676804.aspx
 
More Texas Red from the definitive food site: Roadfood!
#52
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RE: Texas Red 2012/12/23 12:26:53 (permalink)
All the CASI winners seem to use Sazon Goya.  I found at least 3 varieties of it.  Which Sazon Goya variety do they use?  Any thoughts on using it in home recipes?  It is heavy in MSG & salt.
#53
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RE: Texas Red 2012/12/23 14:17:47 (permalink)
JRPfeff

All the CASI winners seem to use Sazon Goya.  I found at least 3 varieties of it.  Which Sazon Goya variety do they use?  Any thoughts on using it in home recipes?  It is heavy in MSG & salt.

 
All the competition chili cooks I hang out with in Austin swear by Sazon Goya, and they're not shy about admitting that MSG is why. Let's face it: the umami boost it gives food is undeniable. It's why we love mushrooms, tomatoes, and parmesan cheese.
#54
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RE: Texas Red 2012/12/23 15:10:15 (permalink)
Twinwillow

sw2geeks

EdSails

Masa harina is a mexican-style corn meal. It's what is used to make tamales with. You should be able to find it with the other cornmeal-type products.

You can also use crushed corn tortillas chips or corn tortillas; they contain the same masa harina flour.


I know in Dallas, (and probably all of Texas) Masa Harina is available everywhere! 

 
I live in semi suburban/rural Northern Illinois and Masa Harina is available everywhere. 
#55
MetroplexJim
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RE: Texas Red 2012/12/23 18:46:53 (permalink)
Frank X. Tolbert's daughter runs http://www.tolbertsrestaurant.com/ in Grapevine, TX (near DFW).  Of course her daddy's "Texas Red" is on the menu and it is quite good.
 
However, (IMHO) the very best chili can be mode at home following this recipe by Emeril Lagasse:  http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/emeril-live/texas-style-chili-recipe/index.html .  We make it several times each Winter, and it's even better the following day or out of the freezer.
#56
Adjudicator
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RE: Texas Red 2013/02/24 16:05:36 (permalink)
tiki

[id="quote"]quote: Originally posted by carlton pierre

I used to think it was only certain foreign foods you couldn't buy around here. Now it's ingredients for Texas Chili. The recipe looks pretty darn good but I'll never find the chili pulp. I guess I'mused to eating chili with beans but there are times when the beans tend to overwhelm a chili. Wish I could try this.


Try this one---its Texan--its good and you can probably get the ingrediants anywhere! Enjoy!

Texas Red

This is the authentic Texas "Bowl of Red."

2 tablespoons vegetable oil
2 large onions, coarsely chopped
5 cloves garlic, crushed
2 to 2 1/2 pounds lean boneless beef, cut into 1/2-inch cubes
3 tablespoons Gebhardt® chili powder
1 tablespoon paprika
1 teaspoon crushed dried hot peppers
2 teaspoons cumin
2 teaspoons Mexican oregano
1 cup hot water
1 teaspoon salt
1 to 2 tablespoons Masa Harina®

In a large Dutch oven heat the oil over medium heat. Add the onions and garlic and sauté until very lightly browned.

Add the beef cubes in several batches and brown on all sides. When all the beef is browned, add all remaining ingredients except the Masa Harina®. Bring to a simmer, then cover and cook over low heat for 3 to 4 hours until the meat is very tender. If too much of the liquid cooks away, add some more hot water during the cooking. Adjust salt and chili powder, adding more to taste if desired.

To thicken the chili, mix the Masa Harina® with a little cold water, then add this to the chili while it is still simmering. Cook the chili 10 to 15 minutes longer.

Serve the chili in bowls with saltines and cooked pinto beans on the side.



BTW---ive become very partial to somthing called RedTop stew---make up a ggo vegetable stew and this chili---serrve a bowl of the stew with a big old ladle of Texas Red on top---mmmm-mm--great on a cold winter day!!!

PS---you can make this as spicy as you want with the addition of little more of whatever hot stuff suits you!---i usually add little tabaco to mine-but the wife is a bit of a wimp in that area.


Bingo! 
 
Starting mine now    
post edited by Adjudicator - 2013/03/02 11:25:34
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