The history of Black Eyed Peas and good luck.

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PapaJoe8
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2006/12/27 16:40:10 (permalink)

The history of Black Eyed Peas and good luck.

One story is that during the Civil War the folks from the north raided the southern farms, but they thought Black Eyed Peas, also known as "horse peas", were only used to feed the livestock. All that was left for the farmers to eat was Black Eyed Peas and some pork fat. They felt lucky to have anything to eat. Thats why plack Eyed peas are known as a lucky thing to eat.

But... that's just one story! " />
Joe
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    Davydd
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    RE: The history of Black Eyed Peas and good luck. 2006/12/27 17:43:33 (permalink)
    Although I was stationed in Newport, RI, I learned of that tradition from my southern Navy friends. We have black eyed peas every New Year's day. When we first moved to Minnesota you could not find them. Now they are generally more available.
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    Foodbme
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    RE: The history of Black Eyed Peas and good luck. 2006/12/27 17:44:15 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by PapaJoe8

    One story is that during the Civil War the folks from the north raided the southern farms, but they thought Black Eyed Peas, also known as "horse peas", were only used to feed the livestock. All that was left for the farmers to eat was Black Eyed Peas and some pork fat. They felt lucky to have anything to eat. Thats why plack Eyed peas are known as a lucky thing to eat.

    But... that's just one story! " />
    Joe


    PapaJoe8

    According to Wikipedia, your version is correct
    "On New Year's Day in the American South, black-eyed peas are traditionally eaten. In some areas of the South, they are part of a traditional dish called "Hoppin' John", made of peas cooked with rice, pork (such as hog jowls, fatback, neckbone, or hock), and seasonings. Residents of other parts of the South may eat them simply with fatback, or with a hot chili sauce. It is supposed to bring good luck and also financial enrichment. The peas stand for the coins, while collard or mustard greens that are served with hoppin' john symbolize paper money. Corn bread also usually accompanies this meal.

    These traditions date back to the U.S Civil War, especially in areas ravaged by General Sherman. Sherman's troops, among those of other commanders, would typically strip the countryside of all food and livestock and destroy what they couldn't carry away. At that time, northerners considered "field peas" as they called them, and corn only fit for animal fodder, and as a result didn't steal or destroy them. This mistake allowed many southerners to survive on these humble foods."
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    roossy90
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    RE: The history of Black Eyed Peas and good luck. 2006/12/27 17:48:03 (permalink)
    Small local pub back home in Florida always has black eyed peas, collard greens and cornbread for everyone on New Years Day.
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    RubyRose
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    RE: The history of Black Eyed Peas and good luck. 2006/12/27 18:01:04 (permalink)
    In the Pennsylvania Dutch culture, pork and sauerkraut is a must to eat on New Year's Day to ensure good luck in the coming year. No one is quite sure how the tradition started but my grandmother remebers eating it at her grandparents' house on January 1st. There's some story about a pig rooting forward so the pork taking you forward into the New Year.

    All I know is that I'm afraid not to do it.
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    PapaJoe8
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    RE: The history of Black Eyed Peas and good luck. 2006/12/27 18:08:52 (permalink)
    Now I'm afraid also Ruby. I am going to put some sauerkraut in my ham and black eyed pea stew. Hey, might be real good. Hmm, maybe I'll just eat it on the side.
    Joe
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    Davydd
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    RE: The history of Black Eyed Peas and good luck. 2006/12/27 19:55:48 (permalink)
    Pork is my Pennsylvania Dutch ancestry I guess.
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    Foodbme
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    RE: The history of Black Eyed Peas and good luck. 2006/12/28 00:50:38 (permalink)

    Here Ya Go!
    The Pennsylvania Dutch believed in pork and sauerkraut. The pork symbolized looking forward. A fowl scratches backward -- a pig roots forward. The Germans in New York swore by herring. Eating a piece at the stroke of midnight would bring luck throughout the year. In the Ozarks, White Mountain superstition counseled "always make sure the salt-shaker is full on New Year's Day, and you will prosper through the year." People in Illinois believed "If you cry on New Year's Day, you will be sorry throughout the year." And across America to Hawaii the belief that "Bad luck comes if a girl is your first visitor: good luck, if a man comes first," is still noted by those who believe in such omens.
    Source:http://www.chamomiletimes.com/articles/newyear.htm
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    Davydd
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    RE: The history of Black Eyed Peas and good luck. 2006/12/28 15:36:57 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Foodbme

    The Germans in New York swore by herring. Eating a piece at the stroke of midnight would bring luck throughout the year.


    So that explains my wife's family tradition. Both sides of her family are of German ancestry settling in Stapleton, Staten Island, NY.
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    PapaJoe8
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    RE: The history of Black Eyed Peas and good luck. 2006/12/28 15:56:27 (permalink)
    Ok, this new years I will have some sauerkrout with my black eyed pea and ham stew ( sounds real good actually! ), have a peice or herring at midnight, and make sure the first visitor in my door is not a girl. hey, why take any chances? Oh, and make sure all my salt shakers are full. And, no crying.

    It is interesting to learn all of these new years tradetions, thanks all! Anyone have more?
    Jow
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    Foodbme
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    RE: The history of Black Eyed Peas and good luck. 2006/12/28 19:01:44 (permalink)
    Here's some more PapaJoe8. click and be amazed

    http://www.oldsuperstitions.com/new_years.html
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