The horrors of lard

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Route 11
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2003/11/04 19:21:29 (permalink)

The horrors of lard

I checked out a website that had folks complaining that Cracker Barrel puts lard in its biscuits.
While I'm shocked that a chain would actually take such a step towards authenticity, I can honestly say I respect anyone who cooks with it at home.

And what would fried chicken be without it?

What else do you like with your lard?

#1

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    Mayhaw Man
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    RE: The horrors of lard 2003/11/04 19:44:10 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Route 11

    I checked out a website that had folks complaining that Cracker Barrel puts lard in its biscuits.
    While I'm shocked that a chain would actually take such a step towards authenticity, I can honestly say I respect anyone who cooks with it at home.

    And what would fried chicken be without it?

    What else do you like with your lard?




    Lard is also a key ingredient in Popeye's bisquits (which are excellent and their red beans (ditto). Making a pie crust to win the county fair ......lard.....going whole hog on a fried chicken expedition.....lard.

    Lard is the way to go if you are trying to avoid the flatness of hydrogenated veg. oil. I don't use it often (except in pie crusts) but when I do, oh boy, I love the results. "Natures perfect grease"

    Brought to you by the "Lard Appreciation Society of South Louisiana"
    #2
    lleechef
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    RE: The horrors of lard 2003/11/04 20:15:22 (permalink)
    My neighbor in the north of France made the best french fries I had ever eaten (and still to this day) so after inquiring about the species of potato, how long did she cook them, what temp, etc. I finally learned the secret: she fried them in a mixture of half lard and half oil infused with a bay leaf and a few garlic cloves. You won't stop until the last fry is gone and you'll be lickin your fingers and wish you had more. I have used goose fat or duck fat (basically the same as lard, more taste than oil, different beast) to pan-fry potatoes and they are excellent!

    How does one become a member of the Lard Appreciation Society of South Louisiana
    #3
    pigface
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    RE: The horrors of lard 2003/11/04 20:40:07 (permalink)
    It does make the Best Pastry ...

    Will the Lard Appreciation Society of Southern Louisiana
    Accept memberships from Northern'ers
    #4
    Mayhaw Man
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    RE: The horrors of lard 2003/11/04 20:50:30 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by lleechef

    My neighbor in the north of France made the best french fries I had ever eaten (and still to this day) so after inquiring about the species of potato, how long did she cook them, what temp, etc. I finally learned the secret: she fried them in a mixture of half lard and half oil infused with a bay leaf and a few garlic cloves. You won't stop until the last fry is gone and you'll be lickin your fingers and wish you had more. I have used goose fat or duck fat (basically the same as lard, more taste than oil, different beast) to pan-fry potatoes and they are excellent!

    How does one become a member of the Lard Appreciation Society of South Louisiana


    You have to ask. We do not have a waiting list. Most people do not want ot belong to a club whose memebers are known far and wide as "Lardasses"

    I will email you membership info and an address where you can send your rather steep (but well worth it) dues. You may notice that the address is similar to my own, but don't let that fool you. All of this is strictly on the level. Remember to make your check out to Brooks
    #5
    LizzieR
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    RE: The horrors of lard 2003/11/04 20:57:15 (permalink)
    There is a famous bakery cafe in New York City that shall remain nameless that makes outstanding cupcakes with lard. I think they even use it in their icing!!
    #6
    meowzart
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    RE: The horrors of lard 2003/11/04 22:12:09 (permalink)
    When we were in Italy, our antipasti at one restaurant was a selection of salumi, or cured meats. It had all the good stuff: prosciutto, salami, etc. But in the middle of this beautiful plate of cold cuts were strips of white with a peppery rind. I asked our waitress what it was, and she proudly exclaimed, "Larda!" Damn, it sure was good! Smokey and rich and a little spicy. The whole thing came with toasted bread. The larda on the bread was darn near perfection.

    Don't anybody take my lard away!
    #7
    markolenski
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    RE: The horrors of lard 2003/11/04 22:22:19 (permalink)
    How many pigs had to die for that cupcake?
    #8
    RubyRose
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    RE: The horrors of lard 2003/11/04 22:36:26 (permalink)
    Lard makes the flakiest pie crust ever.
    #9
    Liketoeat
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    RE: The horrors of lard 2003/11/04 22:41:44 (permalink)
    Lard has many virtues, but none so great as for making flaky pie crusts, as RubyRose has just pointed out.
    #10
    Ort. Carlton.
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    RE: The horrors of lard 2003/11/04 23:09:39 (permalink)
    Dearfolk,
    My potato-chip-loving friend Kurt Wood tells me that the world's best potato chips are Diefenbach's from somewhere near Ephrata, PA. They are sold in plain brown paper sacks instead of plastic bags and are proudly labelled "cooked in 100% pure lard." - "You don't have to chew them," he insists. "They melt in your mouth."
    My favorite chips are Sterzing's Tri-Some from Burlington, Iowa; those folks hand-stir and cook in palm oil... or so I have been told by a local. They're only available east as far as Monmouth, Illinois, although my eye doctor from Des Moines tells me that he's seen them there. I need to hire him to bring me some back the next time he drives out thataway....
    Should a continuation of this subthread move over to the "Great Regional Potato Chips" heading?
    Trying To Shed Some Of My Lard By Not Eating Any, Ort. Carlton, Joyfully Burping Shepherd's Pie From Normaltown Cafe' In Athens, Georgia.
    #11
    Route 11
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    RE: The horrors of lard 2003/11/04 23:29:38 (permalink)
    I think Gibbles potato chips are made with lard. I also remember my mother telling me store-bought cake had lard whipped with sugar as icing.

    Store bought as in Food Lion, Giant or Kroger etc....
    #12
    Rick F.
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    RE: The horrors of lard 2003/11/05 00:32:00 (permalink)
    Ort. is far too 'umble. He has written a veritable[url='http://www.flagpole.com/Issues/05.06.98/ort.html']tome[/url] on undiscovered culinary delights. Thank you, most self-effacing one.
    #13
    Lucky Bishop
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    RE: The horrors of lard 2003/11/05 03:19:35 (permalink)
    No self-respecting tortilla is made with anything except melted lard.
    #14
    spadoman
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    RE: The horrors of lard 2003/11/05 05:40:49 (permalink)
    I love the stuff. You are all correct. Lard makes the best pies and pastries, tortillas and other indescribible earthly delights, but I don't use it because of its bad rap on heart disease.

    But if you think about it, why not use it in moderation? Ok, I changed my mind.

    I knew an outitter in Northern Minnesota who put a tub of lard in with a heavy frying skillet for frying fish at the shore lunch while on canoe trips.
    He went out of his way to rent only the newest lightest most technilogically sound equipment for canoe trips in the Boundary Waters Widerness Area (BWCA), but was sure to put in a heavy pan and lard so the fish dinner you made while out on the canoe trail was the best you can make. He was right! The extra weight was worth it.
    #15
    jgleduc
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    RE: The horrors of lard 2003/11/05 05:48:04 (permalink)
    I'd have to agree with many posters above - lard helps make a fantastic pie crust. My mom looks down on anything else.
    #16
    RubyRose
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    RE: The horrors of lard 2003/11/05 08:11:12 (permalink)
    I had previously posted this on a potato chip thread.

    Thought you might enjoy this blurb from the back of the Gibble's bag:

    "Today, with all the various oils on the market, Gibble's still uses lard - an animal fat - to make their potato chips. Why? Because we believe that simple and natural is best.

    Do you realize that, commonly, to produce vegetable oil, seeds must be roasted, steel rolled, and flooded with hexane solvent to extract the oil, which is then treated with lye, neutralized with hydrochloric acid, filtered through diatomaceous earth, and deodorized under high temperature?

    Lard is a rich, naturally stable fat, rendered from pork that provides the true home style flavore most people prefer. Pure energy. Simple and delicious."

    Ah, I'll have to remember that.
    #17
    scbuzz
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    RE: The horrors of lard 2003/11/05 08:16:49 (permalink)
    Lard makes the best biscuits, the best pie crust and the best fried chicken and chicken fried steak !!!!

    Oh !! sweet elixir of life !!!!


    Gotta luv them piggies for giving up their lifes for so high a calling !!!!!
    #18
    Route 11
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    RE: The horrors of lard 2003/11/05 12:38:18 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by RubyRose

    I had previously posted this on a potato chip thread.

    Thought you might enjoy this blurb from the back of the Gibble's bag:

    "Today, with all the various oils on the market, Gibble's still uses lard - an animal fat - to make their potato chips. Why? Because we believe that simple and natural is best.

    Do you realize that, commonly, to produce vegetable oil, seeds must be roasted, steel rolled, and flooded with hexane solvent to extract the oil, which is then treated with lye, neutralized with hydrochloric acid, filtered through diatomaceous earth, and deodorized under high temperature?

    Lard is a rich, naturally stable fat, rendered from pork that provides the true home style flavore most people prefer. Pure energy. Simple and delicious."

    Ah, I'll have to remember that.


    I love the pure energy part of that!
    #19
    Willly
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    RE: The horrors of lard 2003/11/05 12:48:27 (permalink)
    Lard is also a requirment for Carnitas, pork chunks slowed cooked in lard until falling apart tender. Where would the world be without carnitas tacos?
    #20
    EliseT
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    RE: The horrors of lard 2003/11/05 13:20:44 (permalink)
    Isn't twinkie filling lard and sugar?
    #21
    Mayhaw Man
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    RE: The horrors of lard 2003/11/05 13:27:30 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by EliseT

    Isn't twinkie filling lard and sugar?


    I was under the impression that twinkie filling was a natural element much like hydrogen or oxygen. It appears in very small print at the bottom of the element chart (TF) twinkiefillimonium.
    #22
    EdSails
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    RE: The horrors of lard 2003/11/05 13:36:18 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by RubyRose

    Lard makes the flakiest pie crust ever.


    Well.........try it with duck fat sometime.....even better!
    #23
    meowzart
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    RE: The horrors of lard 2003/11/05 14:42:55 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by clothier

    Well, let's see, that's about 16 for lard, and none against.


    markolenski didn't seem too happy about it...
    #24
    Sundancer7
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    RE: The horrors of lard 2003/11/05 15:20:28 (permalink)
    Over the years I have spent quite a bit of time in Germany because the owner of our subsiduary is in Frankfort and Marburg. I have been invited to many meals at colleagues homes. I have noticed at breakfast, lunch and dinner, bacon grease is often spread on bread like butter and consumed. I did not consider it bizarre, but I had never observed it done in the USA. Perhaps it is a more common practice than I realized. Living in Tennessee exposed me to very little of other cultures until I started traveling.

    Incidentally they used both hot and cold bacon grease.

    Another thing is I sure did enjoy German breakfast. It use to tear them up when I always wanted a Diet Coke with my breakfast. One hotel would only serve me one and made me stop. Their coffee was awfully strong.

    Paul E. Smith
    Knoxville, TN
    #25
    EdSails
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    RE: The horrors of lard 2003/11/05 15:32:23 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Sundancer7

    Over the years I have spent quite a bit of time in Germany because the owner of our subsiduary is in Frankfort and Marburg. I have been invited to many meals at colleagues homes. I have noticed at breakfast, lunch and dinner, bacon grease is often spread on bread like butter and consumed. I did not consider it bizarre, but I had never observed it done in the USA. Perhaps it is a more common practice than I realized. Living in Tennessee exposed me to very little of other cultures until I started traveling.

    Incidentally they used both hot and cold bacon grease.

    Another thing is I sure did enjoy German breakfast. It use to tear them up when I always wanted a Diet Coke with my breakfast. One hotel would only serve me one and made me stop. Their coffee was awfully strong.

    Paul E. Smith
    Knoxville, TN


    As part of a birthday dinner I cooked Sunday, I made fresh green beans, sauteed in bacon fat (from breakfast) and then sprinkled with bread crumbs just before serving. It disappeared fast.
    BTW-----make me another one for----especially for carnitas. Lard is good!
    #26
    EdSails
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    RE: The horrors of lard 2003/11/05 15:47:09 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by clothier

    quote:
    Originally posted by EdSails

    quote:
    Originally posted by RubyRose

    Lard makes the flakiest pie crust ever.


    Well.........try it with duck fat sometime.....even better!


    My grandmother, kosher that she was, swore by goose fat.

    Could we call it faux schmaltz?
    #27
    meowzart
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    RE: The horrors of lard 2003/11/05 16:28:09 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by clothier

    quote:
    Originally posted by meowzart

    quote:
    Originally posted by clothier

    Well, let's see, that's about 16 for lard, and none against.


    markolenski didn't seem too happy about it...


    you mean that WASN"T a joke????


    Twasn't any smiley emoticons and such in message, so I assumed it wasn't a joke...maybe it was. I should give the benefit of the doubt, I suppose.

    HAHHAHHAHAHHAHAHAHHAHAHA!!! That was a good one!!!
    #28
    Kristi S.
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    RE: The horrors of lard 2003/11/10 13:50:35 (permalink)
    If in doubt, try here:

    http://www.lard.net/
    #29
    Spudnut
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    RE: The horrors of lard 2003/11/10 15:19:39 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by LizzieR

    There is a famous bakery cafe in New York City that shall remain nameless that makes outstanding cupcakes with lard. I think they even use it in their icing!!



    Why does the bakery have to remain nameless? Spill it! Please?

    Is it Buttercup? Cupcake Cafe? Famous Ray's Lard Cupcakes and Icing?
    #30
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