Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location

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EliseT
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/01/25 07:03:59 (permalink)
I love bean pies! They are similar to a sweet potato pie or pumpkin pie, made with smashed/pureed pinto beans. You wouldn;t know they had beans in them if no one told you. Nation of Islam members sell them on streetcorners to raise money. If you ever see guys wearing suits with bow ties standing on the corner with a stack of newspapers and pink bakery boxes, that's where you get your bean pie. They also make one heck of a pineapple pie. And they never call me a blue-eyed devil to my face.

Rhodes
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/01/25 08:34:10 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by fogwater

Hi. Dispatch from CanaDada:

Where I live, Lunenburg County, NS, we've got Lunenburg sausage & Puddin (that would be meat puddin). Sauerkraut is real big here too. If I drew a triangle around me, 2 of the points would be Tancook Sauerkraut & Krispi Kraut. The 3rd point would be the Atlantic. Some other specialties: Solomun Gundy, hodge podge & smeltz potatoes. As with most things, though, there is probably crossover with other east coast Maritime communities. "Unique" is never thoroughly so. Especially since North America is a land of immigrants. We'd have to go way back to find the original unique cuisines, although a lot can be found still, like bannock or fry bread & venison stews. There were a lot of German settlers here, so you'd probable find similar dishes in Germany. People like their tea here, too, which is a British thang. And, at Christmas, 'Chicken Bones', a candy.


Some other features of NS/East Coast Canada cuisine: Bologna in several forms (i.e., `wax' bologna, slabs of various sizes and shapes), Scallops (esp. Digby), smoked salmon (hot and cold cures), Sussex ginger ale, `extra salt' butter - that was a new one for me! Ditto on the great local love of sauerkraut and stews of all kinds - one thing I've never seen elsewhere in grocery stores is `stew packs' - an assorted package of vegetables with two or three carrots, potatoes, turnips etc - basically all that you need for stew besides meat.


Hi, Rhodes! Yeah, bologna is called Newfie Steak sometimes. Also can't forget oat cakes, which vary from thick to thin, sweet to not so, from region to region. Hard tack biscuits. Queen Elizabeth cake. Scallops for sure! Yum...big juicy scallops wrapped in bacon & baked. Rum a plenty.


Greetings to you as well! Let's not forget the great East Coast love of Tim Horton's donuts, which eclipses the donut passion of almost anywhere else, US or Canada! And Newfoundland cuisine is a category (practically its own language ) unto itself - Cod's tongues, Jigg's Dinner, scrunchions, fish & brewis, bakeapple pie, screech....
tiki
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/01/25 08:59:38 (permalink)
Ok--Cod,s tomgues i know---but Jiggs dinner?? Scrunchins??Fish and Brewies??Screech??----you gotta fill us in,please!
lileo
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/01/25 09:31:58 (permalink)
I know that the NY area is overdone - everyone seems to know what comes from there. But now that I live in Northern Virginia, a seemingly cosmopolitan place just outside of Washington, DC, there are foods that I just can't get. Or, if I get them here, they're not worth having. Foods that I miss dearly:

Corned beef - sure, we get corned beef here, but NY's is a breed apart. My husband could not understand my craving until I took him to a REAL NY deli. Now he's a believer.
Egg Creams - no egg, no cream. What the heck? Just a Black and White Ice Cream Soda, hold the ice cream.
Black and White Ice Cream Soda - I haven't even seen them here. So simple, yet so wonderful. If you asked for one here they'd look at you like you'd just broken out into Mandarin. Besides, where would you ask? Baskin Robbins?
Bialys - someone mentioned earlier that they are universally available. Wish it were true.
There are precious few real bakeries in this area. Most people are resigned to buying their baked goods at the grocery store, where the quality is dismal. The closest real bakery to us is 1/2 hour away, so I usually just bake my own. So, there's a whole category here that I miss: real buttercream "birthday" cakes, butter cookies (with real butter), black & white cookies, coffee cakes (they don't really do yeast cakes here), really good rugulah.
I know thee are other things that I'm just not remembering right now

Rhodes
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/01/25 10:14:09 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by tiki

Ok--Cod,s tomgues i know---but Jiggs dinner?? Scrunchins??Fish and Brewies??Screech??----you gotta fill us in,please!


Jigg's dinner is a version of New England boiled dinner made with salted beef and pork products, fish and brewis is boiled salt cod and hardtack, served with scrunchions, which are salt pork cracklins, and screech is a type of dark rum, apparently named because of what it occasionally causes non-experienced drinkers to emit when sampling the famed beverage " />
wanderingjew
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/01/25 13:37:32 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by spweimerskirch

WanderingJew,
I love your flare and sense of food. Just a quick observation from Junior Burger..


Why thank you! If you have any questions, I'll try to answer them the best that I can.
Rhodes
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/01/25 13:52:32 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by clothier

quote:
Originally posted by Rhodes
, fish and brewis is boiled salt cod and hardtack, served with scrunchions, which are salt pork cracklins,


OK, correct me if I'm wrong, but did you just describe

Lutefisk?


My impression is that fish and brewis forgoes the initial soaking-in-lye treatment that lutefisk gets, therefore not creating the unique gelatinous texture of that much-beloved dish. Cod's tongues, now _that's_ gelatinous...I bet many Newfoundlanders would enjoy lutefisk if they got the chance
Michael Hoffman
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/01/26 11:26:04 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by MikeSh

<blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<div style="border: 1px #999999 solid; background-color: #DCDCDC; padding: 4px;">Originally posted by Lone Star

Bushie - you did not mention Pecos cantelopes, our beautiful, sweet fruits from the arid Pecos Valley. There is something about the soil there that makes them the best in the world.

Sorry LoneStar, gotta disagree. THE Best cantalopes come from the central San Jauquin valley of Calif. Especially around Firebaugh and Mendota. There just isn't a better melon then one of these picked ripe and fresh from the field, served chilled.

Boy how I miss the produce from Fresno.

Mendota? I haven't heard of that town in more that 40 years. I remember gigging frogs at night in the irrigation ditches around Mendota when I was working the midnight tower on drilling rigs in that area.
Sundancer7
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/01/26 12:06:48 (permalink)
Being from Tennessee and not much coastal exposure, what are cod Tongues. Is it just a cut of the Cod?

Paul E. Smith
Knoxville, TN
fogwater
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/01/26 12:52:57 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by Sundancer7

Being from Tennessee and not much coastal exposure, what are cod Tongues. Is it just a cut of the Cod?

Paul E. Smith
Knoxville, TN


A cod tongue is just that. And don't forget the cheeks! Also seal flipper pie; that's another Newfoundland specialty. Pretty much an 'eat what you got' philosophy, though cod has definitely lost its ubiquity.
chicagostyledog
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/01/26 14:30:38 (permalink)
Racine, Wisconsin is famous for SC Johnson and kringles. Kringles are a large delicious butter-layered flaky pastry filled with fruit or nuts and drizzled with a sweet white frosting. Racine Danish kringles are baked daily at the following: O&H Danish Bakery(2 stores), Lehmann's, Larson's and Bendtsen's. Visit www.ohdanishbakery.com to order their products. Racine is also famous for Horlich, the company that made malt powder and tablets. Door County, Wisconsin is known for fish boils. Friday night fish frys are popular throught the state. Milwaukee is known for it's creamy custard at Kopp's and Leon's and fine encased meats from the Usinger Sausage Company. Culver's, a Wisconsin based chain has brought custard and butterburgers into the national limelight, while Sheboygan has been famous for it's brats.
wanderingjew
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/01/26 14:45:13 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by chicagostyledog

Racine, Wisconsin is famous for SC Johnson and kringles. Kringles are a large delicious butter-layered flaky pastry filled with fruit or nuts and drizzled with a sweet white frosting. Racine Danish kringles are baked daily at the following: O&H Danish Bakery(2 stores), Lehmann's, Larson's and Bendtsen's. Visit www.ohdanishbakery.com to order their products. Racine is also famous for Horlich, the company that made malt powder and tablets. Door County, Wisconsin is known for fish boils. Friday night fish frys are popular throught the state. Milwaukee is known for it's creamy custard at Kopp's and Leon's and fine encased meats from the Usinger Sausage Company. Culver's, a Wisconsin based chain has brought custard and butterburgers into the national limelight, while Sheboygan has been famous for it's brats.


Can't forget those delicious fried cheese curds which are known throught the state!
Cakes
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/01/26 15:23:56 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by chicagostyledog

Racine, Wisconsin is famous for SC Johnson and kringles. Kringles are a large delicious butter-layered flaky pastry filled with fruit or nuts and drizzled with a sweet white frosting. Racine Danish kringles are baked daily at the following: O&H Danish Bakery(2 stores), Lehmann's, Larson's and Bendtsen's. Visit www.ohdanishbakery.com to order their products. Racine is also famous for Horlich, the company that made malt powder and tablets. Door County, Wisconsin is known for fish boils. Friday night fish frys are popular throught the state. Milwaukee is known for it's creamy custard at Kopp's and Leon's and fine encased meats from the Usinger Sausage Company. Culver's, a Wisconsin based chain has brought custard and butterburgers into the national limelight, while Sheboygan has been famous for it's brats.


Beer
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/01/26 15:30:52 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by fogwater

quote:
Originally posted by Sundancer7

Being from Tennessee and not much coastal exposure, what are cod Tongues. Is it just a cut of the Cod?

Paul E. Smith
Knoxville, TN


A cod tongue is just that. And don't forget the cheeks! Also seal flipper pie; that's another Newfoundland specialty. Pretty much an 'eat what you got' philosophy, though cod has definitely lost its ubiquity.


If you made a sandwich, would it be tongue in cheek? Just asking.
chicagostyledog
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/01/26 16:12:29 (permalink)
Silly me! Beer and cheese curds are a given. As soon as you enter Wisconsin on I94, the 1st exit has a Culver's, second is Club 94, third is the Brat Stop restaurant, forth is Dairyland Greyhound Park dog track, fifth is Mars' Cheese Castle, Nelson's Cheese Store, Merkt's Cheese Outlet, Star Bar, Great Lakes Dragaway, Fireworks Outlet Store, Seven Mile Fair, and the Metro Milwaukee Auto Auction. These are in Kenosha and Racine County. The fun never stops.

I'm as happy as a clam,
Right where I am,
Cause I'm a cheesehead,
In beertown!
Linguist
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/03/13 15:17:32 (permalink)
To wake this thread up a bit..
quote:
Originally posted by mblaze

I grew up in the Capital District area of New York State. There were a few places we called "fish fries" that remain very popular. Ted's, Deet's, Harbor House, and Gallagher's to name a few. Local diners like Bubble's in Mechanicville and the Parkway in Clifton Park also have them on the menu.

Basically a long strip of white fish, probably cod, is breaded in cracker meal, deep fried, and served on a hot dog roll. Its topped with "chili sauce" which, in reality, is little more than ketchup and pickle relish blended together. Tartar sauce is also available for the non-locals.

The treat to this feast in your fist was the "tail", a crunchy piece of fried fish that hung off the end of the bun, that would usually be broken off and savored separately.

I've since relocated to New York City where there is nothing like a fish fry served. I am well-travelled in the USA and have never enjoyed a fish fry outside NY's Albany-Schenectady-Troy area.

Does anybody know where else I can get one?


I too grew up there (Troy) and love Ted's Fish Fry. I've lived in Maryland, Texas, and California, and visited several other states, and never found the like anywhere else. I can't even find them outisde the local area (no fish fries in Rochester...)

But the other "local" restaurant treat I miss is the little hot dogs, like those serverd at Charlie's Hot Dogs (which is almost always called "Hot Dog Charlie's"), Famous Lunch, or Gus's. Basically it's a small natural casing hot dog about the size of a brown'n'serve sausage. Cooked on one of those "hot dog roller cookers" or on a stainless steel grill, and served on a similarly miniature roll, topped with yellow mustard, chopped onions, and a "chili" which is really a sort of thin red meat sauce. I've seen a sort of similar dog mentioned on Food TV in many other areas of the country, but I can never be sure if the sauce is the same. Also, no where else have I seen them in this size. They cost about 50 cents each (when they started they were a nickel, I think) and people order them by the dozen and bring them home for dinner. Most typical drink with them is the half-pint of chocolate milk.

Used to be the tradition at Hot Dog Charlie's was for the owner to line the buns up his forearm and fix a dozen or so at a time. The health department put an end to THAT a while ago, but Charlie's is still sometimes referred to as "The Hairy Arm" by those in the know.
Milt
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/03/16 15:05:59 (permalink)
I finally had the time to sit down and read ten pages of posts. Several thoughts, prompted by various posts, in no particular order follow.

I grew up in northwestern New Mexico (Farmington), which is in the Four Corners area near the Navajo Nation. My first thought on reading this thread was only mentioned once - Navajo tacos. Off the reservation they are sometimes called Indian tacos (like in Hopi country). This popular and well known dish is actually quite new. It was first created in Window Rock, Arizona by a hotel/restaurant operator who went to the kitchen late one night to find a snack. By putting several available ingredients together he came up with the first Navajo taco. It was so enjoyable that he put it on his menu, and many others have since copied the general concept. If any of you are ever in Navajo country at meal time, order one. They are generally large (quite filling), but a great dining experience. Fry bread, beans, ground meat, chopped lettuce, chopped tomatoes, shredded cheddar cheese and seasonings.

Several have identified the region with the best melons in the nation. I was taught differently than any of you. My mother taught school in Marlow, Oklahoma from 1929-1939 and always claimed that the next town north - Rush Springs - had the best melons in the country. School was dismissed for a week during the melon harvest so that the students could help their families with the harvest. With transport so much more difficult sixty or seventy years ago, I suspect that several areas had a great reputation for their melons because they were unable to ship great distances.

Sopaipillas are a regional dish. I was first introduced to them at Della's Spanish Dining Room in Farmington. They were served piping hot by the basketful along with a honey dispenser. We would bite a corner off, then drizzle honey inside the sopaipilla. A couple of the restaurants in Old Town Albuquerque also served sopaipillas to the tourists.

For three years as a child and ten years as an adult, I lived in the Kansas City area. Only now have I come to realize what a wonderful opportunity I had for barbecue beef brisket. It is difficult to imagine that one of our local restaurants could have a national identity. Thank you, Calvin Trillin.

Living in the Atlanta area for the past twenty-one years has made me very aware of regional cuisine. We have none. People are constantly searching this, and other, boards for typical Atlanta food. There is none. Local dining is wonderful, but varied. There are wonderful places here for grits, pork barbecue, dim sum, Cuban sandwiches, etc. - but none of it is uniquely Atlanta.

A few years ago, while planning our first ever trip to New England and the Maritimes, I received a sales call from a woman living in Memphis. She was a native of New Brunswick and told me that I would want to order a lobster roll (which I had never heard of) on the trip. I dutifully made note of that and told my wife that we would be having that whenever we came across it. Our first opportunity was in Montauk on Long Island and it was quite good. Several more opportunities presented themselves during the next ten days. We learned that lobster rolls vary as much as huevos rancheros. We even had McLobster (our cheapest and least impressive lobster roll) under the golden arches in Maine.

One last comment. The south is a little large for purposes of the above regional dishes, but one definite impression of the south. Remember, that this temperate climate was quite poor for a very long time. Southerners had little cash, but could keep a few animals and tend a nice sized garden. Many people that I know here talk of how poor they were, and of how well they ate. Nothing fancy, but good hearty meals. The south does vegetables better than any place I have ever experienced. Frequently, I will order a vegetable plate at a restaurant. Okra in its many forms, squash casserole, rutabagas, turnips, greens of several varieties, carrots, fresh tomatoes, fried green tomatoes, green beans, corn, cauliflower, broccoli, brussel sprouts, sweet potatoes, yams, various white potatoes, black eyed peas, crowder peas, field peas, succotash, and much, much more.

Enough of my rambling, but a wonderful thread. It is interesting to learn more of the various areas that I may have only traveled through - or haven't yet visited. Thank you, all.

fcbaldwin
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/03/17 04:32:45 (permalink)
I don't want to get into the history of peanut growing in the U.S., but they were originally grown in southeastern Virginia and eastern North Carolina as hog feed. It was much later that humans decided they liked them too. But the hams that came from peanut fed hogs were truly unique to this region. The Smithfield ham is the most famous product of this process. The huge peanuts that are still grown in this region are now called "gourmet" peanuts and bring a premium price all over the country. And of course the Smithfield hams are a true specialty as well. My family has had Smithfield ham as a tradition at Thanksgiving and Christmas meals for generations.

Frank
queenb
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/03/17 05:18:44 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by Sundancer7

In East Tennessee, it is definately country ham, grits, collards, corn bread, fried corn, fried okra, country sausage, fried eggs in sausage oil, sausage gravy, green beans, tomatoes, onions, blackberry pie, apple pie, pumpkin pie, bisquits and whatever.

Paul E. Smith
Knoxville, TN

I'm from Georgia (real Georgian, not the transplanted-to-Atlanta kind) and for Georgia I'll use this list and add some more! Barbecue...this doesn't mean 'food cooking on a grill' or anything that doesn't involve a hog, whether ribs only, shoulder, picnics or the whole thing slow cooked over hickory coals! And of course Brunswick stew goes with that, and in GA real Brunswick Stew doesn't contain lima beans but does have more pork, chicken, tomatoes, corn and spices.Also, biscuits with white gravy,fried chicken, catfish or any fresh fish,(homegrown) tomato sandwiches, banana sandwiches, squash casserole. Also a favorite...cornbread and milk, either buttermilk or the regular kind (we call the regular milk 'sweet milk' here).In Jr high school, I met a girl from Kansas who visited my Granny's house with me and couldn't beleive we ate that; by the end of the week Granny had taught her not just to eat it but to make cornbread!
For dessert, I'll add coconut cake, pecan pie,pineapple upside down cake, and banana pudding.
Wash all that down with plenty of sweet iced tea of course!
Alexander
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/03/17 06:49:07 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by wanderingjew

<blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<div style="border: 1px #999999 solid; background-color: #DCDCDC; padding: 4px;">Originally posted by Lucky Bishop

Oh, dear lord, I keep forgetting that not everyone knows about Frito Pie.

In its simplest form, it's a small bag of Fritos cut open on the side with a ladle of chili poured in and topped with mild cheddar cheese. This is what you get at snack bars and concession stands around the southwest, and the canonical version.

There's also a homestyle version that's basically a casserole of chili and Fritos mixed together and spread in a pan, then topped heavily with cheese and baked for about 20 minutes.


I remember the first time I had frito pie. I was en route moving from Seattle to Pittsburgh back in January '96. I took the southern route thinking I would avoid the torrential snow in the mountain passes of Idaho and Montana. I couldn't deal with the thought of putting chains on my tires. Well everything was fine until I hit Oklahoma City. The day after I arrived I hit a snow storm with 15 degree temperatures and 30 mph winds. Of course in Oklahoma, no one ever heard of sand, salt and snow plows. I managed to drive 100 miles to Tulsa on solid ice and checked into the Econolodge after stopping at the metro diner for a chicken fried steak lunch (why I remember this I'll never know) Anyway, there was take out joint across from the motel which had bbq, frito pie, etc. I tried the frito pie, and If I can recall, it had raw onions in them. It was quite good. But unfortunately I haven't had frito pie since.


I asked the people in a hot dog place in Columbia, SC if they would make me a Frito Pie, since they had Fritos, chili, and cheese. They thought I was pulling their (collective) leg and refused to make it.

I have to make my own here.
Alexander
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/03/17 07:52:42 (permalink)
South Carolina, mainly lowcountry, not mentioned elsewhere in this thread:

Shrimp and Grits - not the restaurant slop, but just what it says - grits with boiled shrimp, which are usually left over from the night before.
Chicken Bog - mainly in the Peedee area.
Low Country Boil - similar to what was described elsewhere but usually with crabs as well as shrimp. Again, NOT what they serve in restaurants as Beaufort Stew, Frogmore Stew, etc.
Fry Bread - 2 versions, neither of which is bread. 1) Cold grits sliced and fried in bacon grease, and 2) hot grits mixed with eggs and cooked like ordinary pancakes (but in bacon grease) and eaten either hot or cold.
Blenheim Ginger Ale
Rice and Hash (Usually with BBQ)
Stick Pudding
Benne Seed Cookies
Scrapple (not like the PA version)
Various Pilaus, especially Shrimp, Okra, and Chicken. These are often referred to as Shrimp Pie, Okra Pie, etc., but they are really pilaus.
Pickled Shrimp
Shrimp Paste or Loaf
Old Fashioned Fruit cakes that called for 8 - 10 lbs. of fruits.
Lots of other things but the list has made me hungry.
emsmom
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/03/25 13:54:34 (permalink)
Our county is famous for our "Fish Camps" which are non fancy seafood restaurants. Your platter comes piled high with your choice of seafood, regular corn meal coating or salt and pepper. You also get french fries or baked potatoes, coleslaw and of course, hush puppies.

We have a soft drink in our area called "Sun Drop". It is a citrus drink and everyone serves it at parties. The Sun Drop companies also
makes a drink called "Cheerwine" which is a bubbly cherry flavored soft drink-no wine included.

And of course, we have livermush. It is served at every local restaurant on breakfast menus and is also available on sandwiches.
Scarlett
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/03/25 16:32:32 (permalink)
Fish camps, Sun Drop... you must be talking about NC ?
I love it here.
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/07/09 12:16:16 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by Linguist

To wake this thread up a bit..

quote:
Originally posted by mblaze

I grew up in the Capital District area of New York State. There were a few places we called "fish fries" that remain very popular. Ted's, Deet's, Harbor House, and Gallagher's to name a few. Local diners like Bubble's in Mechanicville and the Parkway in Clifton Park also have them on the menu.

Basically a long strip of white fish, probably cod, is breaded in cracker meal, deep fried, and served on a hot dog roll. Its topped with "chili sauce" which, in reality, is little more than ketchup and pickle relish blended together. Tartar sauce is also available for the non-locals.

The treat to this feast in your fist was the "tail", a crunchy piece of fried fish that hung off the end of the bun, that would usually be broken off and savored separately.

I've since relocated to New York City where there is nothing like a fish fry served. I am well-travelled in the USA and have never enjoyed a fish fry outside NY's Albany-Schenectady-Troy area.

Does anybody know where else I can get one?


I too grew up there (Troy) and love Ted's Fish Fry. I've lived in Maryland, Texas, and California, and visited several other states, and never found the like anywhere else. I can't even find them outisde the local area (no fish fries in Rochester...)

But the other "local" restaurant treat I miss is the little hot dogs, like those serverd at Charlie's Hot Dogs (which is almost always called "Hot Dog Charlie's"), Famous Lunch, or Gus's. Basically it's a small natural casing hot dog about the size of a brown'n'serve sausage. Cooked on one of those "hot dog roller cookers" or on a stainless steel grill, and served on a similarly miniature roll, topped with yellow mustard, chopped onions, and a "chili" which is really a sort of thin red meat sauce. I've seen a sort of similar dog mentioned on Food TV in many other areas of the country, but I can never be sure if the sauce is the same. Also, no where else have I seen them in this size. They cost about 50 cents each (when they started they were a nickel, I think) and people order them by the dozen and bring them home for dinner. Most typical drink with them is the half-pint of chocolate milk.

Used to be the tradition at Hot Dog Charlie's was for the owner to line the buns up his forearm and fix a dozen or so at a time. The health department put an end to THAT a while ago, but Charlie's is still sometimes referred to as "The Hairy Arm" by those in the know.


Growing up we eat Fish Fries at the Appleknocker in Albia. But Hot Dog Charlies is my real love. We still go to the one betweem Waterviliet and Cohoes.
Kenny da Fat Man
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/07/09 13:24:20 (permalink)
Checking in from Pittsburgh/Southwestern PA!

Isaly's Chipped Ham - (coupled with Isaly's BBQ Sauce can't be beat!) This longtime favorite lunchmeat has remained a mainstay.

Mancini's Bread - They actually have a backdoor into the kitchen where you can go into and buy bread as it comes out of the oven! The raisin bread is totally unbelievable hot from the oven!

Primanti's Sandwiches - Get your favorite meat, fry it, add a fried egg, cheese, top it french fries and coleslaw all on Mancini's Bread. I love the sweet saugage and egg (double meat).Open W-I-D-E and enjoy.

Clark Bar - My favorite candybar, invented and made in Pittsburgh (now produced elsewhere). It's a rich man's Butterfinger.

Chiodo's Mystery Sandwich - I can't tell you what's on it, or I'll have to kill you. Actually, it's a unique blend of items to make up one delicious sandwich. Order a half - a whole is only for the manly appetite. 8th Ave. in historic Homestead PA. The BOSS has eaten here...

The Original Oyster House makes the biggest and best breaded oyster's you've ever slathered over. That's right, OYSTERS in Pittsburgh. Many would smyte the bombast of breading. They press the oyster into the cornmeal breading and deep fry these cue ball sized finger-lickers. Market Square in Down Town.

The PECAN BALL - This delicious dessert was absoloutly invented here in da Burgh. What is it? It's simple - take fine french vanilla ice cream, roll a large call of it in crushed (but not pulverized) pecans, then drizzle w/ butterscotch or hot chocolate sauce. Sounds simple, but try it it's fantastic!

We love our Polish grub here in Pittsburgh. I would say pierogis are the number one favorite and it's a toss up between haluski, golabki and "kielbossy".

The Turkey Devonshire - Bigtime regional favorite. Never had a devonshire?? You don't know what you're missing! Turkey, bacon, toast, creamy cheese sauce, baked until bubbly. YOW!

Oh, let's not forget fried jumbo for breakfast! (I prefer square jumbo to round).
berndog
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/07/09 15:10:22 (permalink)
I won't repeat the long quote about fish fry, but this must be an upstate NY thing. In Rochester fish fries are very common, both as a sandwich, or as a full meal on a plate with fries and cole slaw. Most restaurants have them as a special on Friday's, and some fish stores make them for take out on Friday. Other restaurants have them available any time.
Heartburn
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/07/09 15:45:45 (permalink)
Has anyone mentioned
Pierogie Pizza in upper NY
Or
Blood Saugage in New England
Sagud
TJ Jackson
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/07/09 16:05:51 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by Kenny da Fat Man

The Turkey Devonshire - Bigtime regional favorite. Never had a devonshire?? You don't know what you're missing! Turkey, bacon, toast, creamy cheese sauce, baked until bubbly. YOW!
Err, this sounds rather suspiciously like the[url='http://www.brownhotel.com/hotbrown.php3']Hot Brown[/url], invented in Louisville Kentucky.....





Kenny da Fat Man
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/07/09 16:31:05 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by TJ Jackson

quote:
Originally posted by Kenny da Fat Man

The Turkey Devonshire - Bigtime regional favorite. Never had a devonshire?? You don't know what you're missing! Turkey, bacon, toast, creamy cheese sauce, baked until bubbly. YOW!
Err, this sounds rather suspiciously like the[url='http://www.brownhotel.com/hotbrown.php3']Hot Brown[/url], invented in Louisville Kentucky.....




LOL....O.K....My chef plagerized (can you do that with food?)...It appears the hot brown was inveted about 5 years before the devonshire.....Here's some more info on the "Pittsburgh Devonshire": http://www.postgazette.com/food/20010215mailbox.asp

Next you'll tell me there is no such thing as having your steak cooked "Pittsburgh Rare" http://pittsburgh.about.com/b/a/083337.htm




stricken_detective
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/07/11 03:36:09 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by chicagostyledog

Racine, Wisconsin is famous for SC Johnson and kringles. Kringles are a large delicious butter-layered flaky pastry filled with fruit or nuts and drizzled with a sweet white frosting. Racine Danish kringles are baked daily at the following: O&H Danish Bakery(2 stores), Lehmann's, Larson's and Bendtsen's. Visit www.ohdanishbakery.com to order their products. Racine is also famous for HorlicK, the company that made malt powder and tablets. Door County, Wisconsin is known for fish boils. Friday night fish frys are popular throught the state. Milwaukee is known for it's creamy custard at Kopp's and Leon's and fine encased meats from the Usinger Sausage Company. Culver's, a Wisconsin based chain has brought custard and butterburgers into the national limelight, while Sheboygan has been famous for it's brats.


...

Silly me! Beer and cheese curds are a given. As soon as you enter Wisconsin on I94, the 1st exit has a Culver's, second is Club 94, third is the Brat Stop restaurant, forth is Dairyland Greyhound Park dog track, fifth is Mars' Cheese Castle, Nelson's Cheese Store, Merkt's Cheese Outlet, Star Bar, Great Lakes Dragaway, Fireworks Outlet Store, Seven Mile Fair, and the Metro Milwaukee Auto Auction. These are in Kenosha and Racine County. The fun never stops.


OMG, please do me a BIG favor--NEVER compare Culvers' to Kopp's ever again, you almost gave me an ulcer. Ok, now that my initial shock is over...I shall try to be more objective, less gradeschool.

Kopp's has the better frozen custard, hands down. Culvers leaves a nasty film on the roof of my mouth. Both have equally good burgers & fries, Kopp's having HUGE portions & Culver's burgers having nice crispy edges. Leon's, on S 27th St, is a legend, having served Bill Clinton when he came through our fine city several times.

You did a fine job of representing us, my friend, I will only add tidbits to what you've already said.

Racine Kringle are worth stopping for. Raspberry, nut flavors, it's all goooood.

Door County is also known for its cherries. So to get a cobbler or pie after your fish boil ROCKS. The fish boil, if I'm remembering correctly is potatoes, whitefish, onions & butter boiled in big kettles.

Milwaukee Fish Fry is fried or baked cod, served with coleslaw (vinegar or creamy, depending on the restaurant), potato pancakes (served with applesauce on request), french fries, tartar sauce, lemons & rye bread w/butter. I've heard Serb Hall is the best in Milwaukee, but I dunno about that.

Yes, there's Usingers (their dogs have the casings), but Johnsonville is king around here. (We have Klements as well) Bratwurst is cooked in a beer boil (3-4 cans beer, 1 stick butter, 1 onion, sliced) and then grilled. You put this on a Sheboygan brat roll, with spicy brown mustard & sauerkraut. My mother always cooked her sauerkraut with a little brown sugar and butter. You can add raw onions now, or use the onions from the beer bath. I don't eat pork, but will have a few of these every summer.

You serve those with German potato salad. It's got a sweet & sour glaze to it, made with vinegar, white sugar & bacon bits. The potatoes are sliced, rather than cubed. You serve it warm.

I grew up in Kenosha. Club 94 is a gay bar. (Not that there's anything wrong with that). Kenosha's got a large Italian population. If you're going to eat there, go Italian & go to Villa De Carlo, right on Lake Michigan. It's where I eat when my Nonna's got other plans. Their pizza is outstanding & their pasta dishes compare to Nonna's (shhhhh!)

Pasties are a miner's thing, my Nana from Green Bay used to make them. Pie dough, fill half w/ground beef, chopped onion, chopped carrot, chopped rutabaga, salt & pepper to taste. Fold the other half over, pinch edges together. Brush w/egg wash & bake. Serve w/ketchup.

Someone mentioned Panzarotti's, here they're called Ponza Rotta's & you can get them in the grocery store or just down the street from me. http://www.jimmysgrottopizza.com/ I love this place b/c you can go there in your pj's & slippers at 11pm & get good food.

Another thing I heard was only available around here is Blue Moon ice cream. Anyone else have that? It's blue in color, and tastes...indescribable. Like marshmallowy, orangey, minty...hard to describe. Cedar Crest makes it here. A summer tradition.

edited to add, I can't believe I forgot the Brat Stop. LOL. My father's band had played there for the last 30 years. You can get a good meal there, they're right off the freeway, so if you don't want to drive the 7 miles into town for Italian, the Brat Stop is good as well.
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