Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location

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6star
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/10/27 22:25:34 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by Tristan Indiana

Here's one I'm curious about. My mom, a very good Hoosier cook, use to make and can something she called chili sauce each summer.


My Mother (in Illinois) also made it. Here is a recipe from http://www.recipezaar.com/recipe/getrecipe.zsp?id=80913 that sounds very much like what she made, though I think she used white sugar instead of brown sugar.

Chili Sauce Recipe
6 quarts ripe tomatoes
3 large onions, minced
1/2 cup coarse pickling salt
3 cups diced celery
2 large red bell peppers, seeded and diced
1/3 cup whole mixed pickling spices (tied in cheesecloth bag)
3/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes
1 1/2 cups apple cider vinegar
4 cups brown sugar

Makes 12 cups, Time: 12 hours (9 hrs. prep.)

1. Peel and slice tomatoes into very large bowl; add onions and salt and stir gently.
2. Cover bowl and let stand for a minimum of 8 hours; overnight is best.
3. Drain thoroughly and place in a large, heavy saucepan with a lid.
4. Stir in celery, red peppers, pickling spice bundle, red pepper flakes and vinegar,
then cover; over medium heat, bring this to a boil.
5. Once boiling, uncover and simmer over low heat until thickened, at least two hours; stir often to prevent sticking.
6. Add brown sugar and stir well; taste for sweetness (if your tomatoes are very tart
or acidic, you may need a little more brown sugar).
7. Simmer mixture until thickened again, about 25 minutes.
8. Remove spice bundle in cheesecloth bag and discard.
9. Ladle mixture into hot sterilized 2-cup jars, leaving 1/2-inch headspace; seal jars.
10. Process in a boiling water bath for 10 minutes.
11. Let cool at room temperature before refrigerating, or storing in a cool dark place for up to one year.
Pogo
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/10/27 23:55:54 (permalink)
Leslie,

You can always find poke weed where the ground has been newly turned, such as new construction. I wouldn't begin to try to describe the weed to you, it is best someone show it to you.

Morels? In ET? I had no idea. All the time I have spent tramping in the woods and have never seen any, guess you have to be looking.

Souse meat. I had forgotten all about that. My aunt used to make the best souse. She would always pickle it and would cut thin slices to eat on saltines. And she always made it HOT AND SPICY!
leslie1787
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/10/28 03:57:18 (permalink)
Pogo,
You know people have gotta think we're crazy eating weeds, but I swear that poke salat is good.
And I didn't know about morels in Tennessee,until my husband talked about foraging for them near Sneedville when he was a kid. Called it "Dry Land Fishing." Check this site out-morelmushroomhunting.com they let on that morels have been found as far south as Ga. I think if you join their group they post sightings of the elusive fungi (fungus?)
It's late [|)].
Pogo
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/10/28 10:50:51 (permalink)
Thanks Leslie!
plb
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/10/28 12:05:30 (permalink)
Wasn't there a song about poke salat Annie? I never had an idea what it was about till now.
sizz
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/10/28 13:26:21 (permalink)
Poke what?? never heard of it so I had to look it up

Salat is the German word for salad, and probably came to the Ozarks with German settlers. Poke salat is made from Pokeweed. In towns you'll find pokeweed growing wild in alleyways and vacant lots. In the country it grows in the fence rows and along the edges of woods. When mature it has clusters of shiny purple berries which birds love to eat.

After a long winter without fresh food, the early settlers looked forward to cooking the first tender green leaves of pokeweed. It gave them vitamins and was a good spring tonic. They'd cook it up with Lamb's Quarters and Dock, which are also early spring greens. Some people today still cook and eat poke greens in the early spring.

Though the whole plant is poisonous, the young leaves can be eaten after cooking them using two changes of water. Poke is still used medicinally. Old timers in the Ozarks still eat one pokeberry a year as a preventative or to treat arthritis.


tmiles
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/10/28 13:56:24 (permalink)
Now I'm confused. I would never have thought to cook it in 2 changes of water. When I think of salad, I think fresh greens, but then there is lobster salad, chicken salad etc
tmiles
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/10/28 13:57:45 (permalink)
I have had cooked lambsquarter and pigweed. It tasts like spinach.
Pogo
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/10/28 15:26:53 (permalink)
Yep, thats pokeweed alright.

My people were from Morgan County, TN and there are a lot of German/Swiss settlers there, I imagine thats where I get the "salat" from.

For anyone that has never tasted it, it has a very black peppery taste.... quite a bite to it.

max4951
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/10/30 19:13:04 (permalink)
Something else, among the many many GREAT foods we have here in Texas are all the Tex-Mex specialities made with Cabaza. Shreaded cabaza is hard to find outside South and South Central Texas but it's much better than all that hamburger based stuff everywhere else. Most HEB stores carry heads dirt cheap to make your own. I'm up in the Panhandle now, and when you talk about it they haven't got a clue. It's kinda like trying to exsplain an Antoines Red Wrap, Giant olives, and a Shiner Bock to people that don't know Houston.
carlton pierre
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/11/07 19:58:16 (permalink)
I seem to remember in NW PA that restaurants sold steak salads with french fries in the salad. I'd never seen that before but I have to say it was quite good.

carl reitz
DLnWPBrown
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/11/07 20:40:45 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by berndog



Another so-called regional food I love is Chicken (or veal) French. Served at most italian restaurants, it is a thin breast breaded with egg wash and crumbs, then sauted in a lemon white wine (or sherry) sauce. I never thought this was a local dish, but a recent article in the local paper claims it is not often found outside the Rochester area.

Can't wait to hear about the other Rood Fooders local favorites. You folks always get my mouth watering and give interesting idea's for things to try when traveling.



Berndog, Our local italian place serves this item and I know the brothers are from Italy. It is made with chicken breast and served as you described.

Dennis in Cary
wanderingjew
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/12/23 14:27:52 (permalink)
Just bringing back this thread because I think it really needs to be brought back!~
tmiles
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/12/23 16:01:50 (permalink)
This thread is an old friend, and I visit often. When I look at "active users", I see that it is popular with the lurkers too.
wanderingjew
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/12/23 16:07:32 (permalink)
Actually, I might as well put this thread to good use. Does anyone know the origin of red beer? That's beer with tomato juice. I hear it's popular in either in the Midwest or Out West. But not sure exactly where?
Ibhungry
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/12/23 18:23:06 (permalink)
Another Chesapeake (Southern MD) area specialty is Maryland Stuffed Ham. The ham is cooked by removing the bone and filling hole with spices and kale. The sandwich (my experience with stuffed ham) adds white bread and mayo all tucked into a convenient wax paper wrapper.

Nice thing to cleanse the palette while at the St. Mary's County Oyster Festival.
Tedbear
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/12/26 18:43:34 (permalink)
Berndog--
Regarding your post:
"Another so-called regional food I love is Chicken (or veal) French. Served at most italian restaurants, it is a thin breast breaded with egg wash and crumbs, then sauted in a lemon white wine (or sherry) sauce. I never thought this was a local dish, but a recent article in the local paper claims it is not often found outside the Rochester area."

Chicken Francese is found on almost all diner menus in NJ! Obviously, "Francese" simply means French in the Italian language, so I think that we are talking about the same thing. It is always a breaded, sauteed, boneless breast of chicken, served with a lemon sauce--albeit usually with way too much of the sauce. While it varies from one location to another, this dish is usually one of the most reliable things to order at a NJ diner.

Some "white table cloth" restaurants in NJ serve this dish, and some even serve Veal Francese, or in a few rare instances, Shrimp Francese.

So, the next time that you are in the Garden State, you can avail yourself of this dish in many venues
!
Tedbear
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/12/26 19:08:33 (permalink)
Something that has evolved into a regional cuisine in Northern NJ over the past 30 years is the fantastic Portuguese/Spanish food that is found in one neighborhood of Newark.

The outsiders call the neighborhood "Ironbound" (from the fact that the neighborhood was once completely surrounded by railroad tracks), but the residents refer to the area as "Down Neck". I have no idea where the latter reference originated.

The neighborhood has played host to a succession of immigrant groups over the past century or so--Irish, German, Italian, and most recently, Portuguese/Spanish and some Brazilians. As a result, the area is awash with restaurants that are truly representative of the Iberian Peninsula, and to a lesser extent, Brazil.

Consequently, if someone is brave enough to venture into the murder and car theft capital of NJ, he is rewarded to find this particular neighborhood that is actually a low-crime area, and is filled with establishments that serve fantastic seafood, beef, and pork dishes in huge portions, at relatively low prices. Street parking is very tight, and as a result, some of the restaurants have set up parking lots.

One of the secrets of going "Down Neck" for a great meal is to get there early if you are going on a Friday or Saturday night. Traditionally, people tend to eat dinner fairly late on the Iberian Peninsula, so if you get to these restaurants by 6:00, the waiting time is usually minimal--except on holidays. The other trick, if you want Paella, is to order for fewer people than will be eating it. A Paella for 2 will comfortably serve 4 people, and there could actually be food left over. A party of 6-8 people could order Paella for 4, and as long as they ordered individual appetizers, they would have a very nice meal. Steaks tend to be immense, and of course, the variety, and the freshness of seafood is impressive.

Sangria is also very good in these restaurants--don't think of the bottled stuff that you bought 25 years ago--these places make it fresh with wine (your choice of white or red), fresh fruit, and a splash of brandy.

A nice flan and a double espresso round out a great meal at any of these places, and there must now be at least 100 of these restaurants scattered around this part of the city.

This neighborhood is a vibrant and safe area. Just be prepared to do a bit of walking from where you park. But, considering how much you will eat, the walking is a good idea.
Mark in Ohio
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/12/26 19:36:20 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by wanderingjew

<blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<div style="border: 1px #999999 solid; background-color: #DCDCDC; padding: 4px;">Originally posted by hilldweller

<blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<div style="border: 1px #999999 solid; background-color: #DCDCDC; padding: 4px;">Originally posted by wanderingjew

<blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<div style="border: 1px #999999 solid; background-color: #DCDCDC; padding: 4px;">Originally posted by hilldweller

<blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<div style="border: 1px #999999 solid; background-color: #DCDCDC; padding: 4px;">Originally posted by wanderingjew

I grew up on Long Island in a town with a large Jewish population and a decent sized italian population.


Did you grow up in Matzohpizza?


No, Merrick.


Oh yes, brings back memories!

Me too. Didn't everyone in Merrick call Massapequa "Matzhopizza?"

What a regionalism, I thought it was a Yiddish corruption of Machu Picchu........some fabulous lost enclave on Long Island...
wanderingjew
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/12/27 08:05:37 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by Tedbear


Something that has evolved into a regional cuisine in Northern NJ over the past 30 years is the fantastic Portuguese/Spanish food that is found in one neighborhood of Newark.


Tedbear,

Portuguese cuisine is extremely prevelant here in Southern New England in the East Providence/Bristol area of Rhode Island as well as the Fall River/New Bedford area in Massachusetts. The Portuguese have been and are still coming here in droves. The myth of the Portuguese Fisherman is actually not entirely correct, many came to work in the various Mills. One thing though, never put Portuguese and Spanish Cuisine in once sentence, many people of Portuguese descent whom I personally know get very defensive. As far as they're concerned Spanish cuisine and culture are entirely different from that of Portugal (It would be like comparing Polish Cuisine with say Thai Cuisine)
Tedbear
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/12/27 10:44:11 (permalink)
Wanderingjew--Trust me, I am well aware that Spain and Portugal have different cultures, different languages and (slightly) different foods. However, the neighborhood of which I spoke (Ironbound/Down Neck in Newark, NJ) is characterized by restaurants owned by Spaniards, Portuguese, Brazilians, and also Basque people.

Is the food different? Yes, but nobody in this area specifically says "I want Spanish", or "I want Portuguese" unless they are actually members of one of those ethnic groups. The residents of North Jersey usually say something like, "Let's go to Ironbound for a great meal", and they are not very hung up on which culture or cuisine a particular restaurant represents.

Many of the places there use generic term "Iberian" in the name of their restaurant, and in many cases the patrons have no idea of whether the place is Spanish, Portuguese, etc. until they see which language the menu is written in. And since most Anglos can't read either language, in many cases they are still in the dark, even after seeing the menu. Fortunately for them, all of the menus have a translation to English.

I don't think particularly hard about which cuisine is represented by a particular restaurant, but I do have my favorites. One of them is actually Basque, but I am willing to bet that the majority of the Anglo patrons could not spell the word Basque, let alone know where the region is. All they know is that the place serves incredible food, in huge portions, at great prices. In truth the Basque style is a little different than "Spanish", but the differences are subtle.

The newest restaurants on the scene are Brazilian-style "Rodizio" restaurants, which feature unlimited portions of a staggering variety of meats cooked on the grill or rotisserie. Very good value for the hard-core carnivore who does not worry about having a coronary bypass! While most of these places are run by Brazilians, many of them are run by Portuguese or Spanish proprietors, as they know a "hot" trend when they see one. This is sort of like the "Japanese" restaurants that are run by Chinese people. Not authentic in the strictest sense of the word, but a very good facsimile.

So--while I do know the difference between Spanish and Portuguese, as well as the more subtle differences between Spanish and Basque and between Portuguese and Brazilian, the distinctions are frequently blurred in the Ironbound/Down Neck area. Perhaps this is not true in Massachusetts, but it is frequently the case in Newark and environs. The real Spaniards and Portuguese know the distinctions, but the general public frequently does not, and that was the jist of my comment.

Regardless--come to the area and you will enjoy some great food at very good prices!
CarolinaBill
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/12/28 16:01:52 (permalink)
A Pittsburgh "delicacy" is something called chipped ham. It is actually very similar to a product found in most parts of country called "chopped ham" that is somewhat like a semi-congealed loaf of pork/ham product. But what makes it "chipped ham" in Pittsburgh style is that it is sliced so thin that it is practically transparent, then stacked liberally on white bread, preferably with good old Heinz ketchup. Yum!

Pittsburgh is also known to "Parmesan"-ize ANYTHING. Shrimp, fish, pork chops, you name it, we'll put spaghetti sauce and cheese on it. And spaghetti is ALWAYS an option in Pittsburgh as your side dish in lieu of a potato or other side.
chezkatie
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/12/28 16:46:24 (permalink)
I really enjoy coming back to read this forum. It really says "Roadfood". I moan and groan about the lack of any really good pizza (in my opinion) but then think about living in an area with the best crab and crab dishes anyone has ever tasted.
wanderingjew
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/12/28 16:48:09 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by chezkatie

I really enjoy coming back to read this forum. It really says "Roadfood". I moan and groan about the lack of any really good pizza (in my opinion) but then think about living in an area with the best crab and crab dishes anyone has ever tasted.


Route 11
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/12/28 17:40:24 (permalink)
I am always happy to see regional items being available on a national level. One thing I can't find outside of New England are those hot dog buns they use that you can toast on both sides.
But the problem just means I have to travel up there for more hot dogs, and that's not a bad deal.

Up there, they never put Texas Pete on fried chicken.
QFan
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/12/28 19:24:27 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by CarolinaBill

A Pittsburgh "delicacy" is something called chipped ham. It is actually very similar to a product found in most parts of country called "chopped ham" that is somewhat like a semi-congealed loaf of pork/ham product. But what makes it "chipped ham" in Pittsburgh style is that it is sliced so thin that it is practically transparent, then stacked liberally on white bread, preferably with good old Heinz ketchup. Yum!

Pittsburgh is also known to "Parmesan"-ize ANYTHING. Shrimp, fish, pork chops, you name it, we'll put spaghetti sauce and cheese on it. And spaghetti is ALWAYS an option in Pittsburgh as your side dish in lieu of a potato or other side.

Speaking of Pittsburgh, when one of my kids was living in that area several yrs ago I discovered that people in the southwestern PA area seem to prefer using mustard on their french fries over ketchup. Only place where I've run into that particular regional preference. Just curious if it's done in any other part of the country?
QFan
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/12/31 21:03:32 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by wanderingjew

Actually, I might as well put this thread to good use. Does anyone know the origin of red beer? That's beer with tomato juice. I hear it's popular in either in the Midwest or Out West. But not sure exactly where?


Not here in the Midwest. This is what's "red beer" here:

http://www.leinie.com/red.htm
1bbqboy
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/12/31 21:24:34 (permalink)
WJ,
I've had red beer in Omaha and points west -Washington and Oregon, but I don't remember growing up with ther idea at all in Kansas/Missouri. Now you've got me intrigued.
Bill
QFan
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2005/01/02 09:41:55 (permalink)
I believe Killian's Red started it here in the U.S. several years ago. Coors Brg bought the recipe from a French brewer who had copied/stolen an old Irish recipe. It was originally an ale, not a lager beer. I think the red color has mostly to do w/ the kind of grains used and how long they cook them to give it a kind of reddish hue.
QFan
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DinoS
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2005/01/02 10:16:01 (permalink)
When I grew up, many bars in western Michigan used to (maybe still do) keep small cans of V8,tomato, or Snap-E-Tom juices on hand for patrons who liked tomato in their beer.

Never heard the term 'red beer' back in those days. We just ordered a 'tomato beer' and it came with a can of our desired juice for an extra $.25 or so.


Dino
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