The most memorable local eateries along the highways and back roads of America
Sign In | Register for Free!
Restaurants Recipes Forums EatingTours Merchandise FAQ Maps Insider
Forum Themes:
Welcome !

 Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location

Change Page: << < ..11121314151617 > | Showing page 13 of 17, messages 361 to 390 of 491
Author Message
ImtheMom

  • Total Posts: 33
  • Joined: 10/8/2003
  • Location: Libertyville, IL
RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location Fri, 01/7/05 6:02 PM (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by QFan

quote:
Originally posted by CarolinaBill

A Pittsburgh "delicacy" is something called chipped ham. It is actually very similar to a product found in most parts of country called "chopped ham" that is somewhat like a semi-congealed loaf of pork/ham product. But what makes it "chipped ham" in Pittsburgh style is that it is sliced so thin that it is practically transparent, then stacked liberally on white bread, preferably with good old Heinz ketchup. Yum!

Pittsburgh is also known to "Parmesan"-ize ANYTHING. Shrimp, fish, pork chops, you name it, we'll put spaghetti sauce and cheese on it. And spaghetti is ALWAYS an option in Pittsburgh as your side dish in lieu of a potato or other side.

Speaking of Pittsburgh, when one of my kids was living in that area several yrs ago I discovered that people in the southwestern PA area seem to prefer using mustard on their french fries over ketchup. Only place where I've run into that particular regional preference. Just curious if it's done in any other part of the country?
QFan
Bonita Springs, FL


Pittsburgh is my beloved hometown, although I don't live there right now. Mustard on french fries is NOT a regional preference there. Perhaps you visited a single restaurant that served french fries with mustard, giving you the impression that it was common. For example, I recall that the fast food place "The Potato Patch" at Kennywood and Sandcastle offers lots of different toppings for french fries such as cheese, gravy or mustard, but I think that's just to provide variety and funky uniqueness. Most people in Pittsburgh put good ol' Heinz Ketchup on their french fries.
 
    QFan

    • Total Posts: 641
    • Joined: 12/8/2004
    • Location: Bonita Springs, FL
    RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location Fri, 01/7/05 7:36 PM (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by ImtheMom

    quote:
    Originally posted by QFan

    quote:
    Originally posted by CarolinaBill

    A Pittsburgh "delicacy" is something called chipped ham. It is actually very similar to a product found in most parts of country called "chopped ham" that is somewhat like a semi-congealed loaf of pork/ham product. But what makes it "chipped ham" in Pittsburgh style is that it is sliced so thin that it is practically transparent, then stacked liberally on white bread, preferably with good old Heinz ketchup. Yum!

    Pittsburgh is also known to "Parmesan"-ize ANYTHING. Shrimp, fish, pork chops, you name it, we'll put spaghetti sauce and cheese on it. And spaghetti is ALWAYS an option in Pittsburgh as your side dish in lieu of a potato or other side.

    Speaking of Pittsburgh, when one of my kids was living in that area several yrs ago I discovered that people in the southwestern PA area seem to prefer using mustard on their french fries over ketchup. Only place where I've run into that particular regional preference. Just curious if it's done in any other part of the country?
    QFan
    Bonita Springs, FL


    Pittsburgh is my beloved hometown, although I don't live there right now. Mustard on french fries is NOT a regional preference there. Perhaps you visited a single restaurant that served french fries with mustard, giving you the impression that it was common. For example, I recall that the fast food place "The Potato Patch" at Kennywood and Sandcastle offers lots of different toppings for french fries such as cheese, gravy or mustard, but I think that's just to provide variety and funky uniqueness. Most people in Pittsburgh put good ol' Heinz Ketchup on their french fries.


    Thanks for clearing that up ImtheMom!
    QFan
    Bonita Springs, FL
     
      harriet1954

      • Total Posts: 1088
      • Joined: 3/29/2003
      • Location: Edgewater Park, NJ
      RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location Sat, 01/8/05 10:59 AM (permalink)
      quote:
      Originally posted by stricken_detective

      quote:
      Originally posted by wanderingjew

      Actually, I might as well put this thread to good use. Does anyone know the origin of red beer? That's beer with tomato juice. I hear it's popular in either in the Midwest or Out West. But not sure exactly where?


      Not here in the Midwest. This is what's "red beer" here:

      http://www.leinie.com/red.htm


      I'm familiar with Leinenkugel, as my boyfriend-before-Bill was from Cadott, WI (and was buried there last year as result of a fatal brain tumor), and brought me a Leinie shirt which I really do cherish! He also brought back cans of Leinie (couldn't bring bottles) along with cheese curds and he shared the beer at a summertime party one year.

      My father and grandfather both owned bars in Philadelphia and Lower Bucks County, PA, and ordering beer with tomato juice in it was common. After I moved to Jersey, I started frequenting my dear old hangout, the Greentop. There was an old man whose name I forget now, and he always ordered pitchers of red beer. I asked him if I could taste it once, and he graciously poured me 12 oz. of it. I thought it tasted really good! I don't remember what kind of beer it was.
       
        LegalLady

        • Total Posts: 404
        • Joined: 1/3/2004
        • Location: Oshkosh, NE
        RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location Sat, 01/8/05 11:14 AM (permalink)
        "Red Beer" is a big thing here in Nebraska, personally I don't like beer, but tomato juice or Snappy Tom might make it taste better!

        The Lady
         
          cheesehead

          • Total Posts: 48
          • Joined: 2/13/2004
          • Location: Janesville, WI
          RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location Tue, 01/18/05 1:23 PM (permalink)
          quote:
          Originally posted by tiki

          <blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<div style="border: 1px #999999 solid; background-color: #DCDCDC; padding: 4px;">Originally posted by Lone Star

          How are the pepper and egg sandwiches made?


          quote:
          My grandmother taught me-----we use roasted red or green peppers that we kept packed in olive oil---now you can buy them anywhere it seems---put some of them-in good sized "chunks"-along with some olive oil and a little crushed red pepper flakes in a fry pan on med heat and saute till the are warm and then swirl in eggs that have been beaten with a touch of water--seems to make them fluffier--and cook as srambled eggs--i usually make them a little firmer than i do normal scrambled eggs, ass they keep in the lunchbox without sogging the bread---i usually butter the bread to keep the mayo from sogging it--unless im eating them right away--white bread btw or Scala if you can get it. Hit them with a touch of good mayo--im partial to Hellmans/BestFoods-a little salt and pepper and-------MMMMMMM My granfather actually liked to toss in a few capers and i do so on occasion,but i think they are best if kept simple ----eggs and roasted peppers compliment each other really well. This started out in our home as a friday lunch---remember when it was a sin for catholics to eat meat on Fridays---God must have changed his mind!-but where to good to only eat once a week, so try em--you'll like em!!




          Tiki, I've been eating these since I was a kid, here in Southern Wisconsin. We called them a fried egg sandwich. (I'm not being a smart ---). We had them, because, as a kid, eggs were cheap. Various vegies would be added, but green and/or red peppers HAD to be included. I like it with Miracle Whip, my wife likes it with Helms.
           
            cindyloo

            • Total Posts: 123
            • Joined: 12/17/2008
            • Location: New York, NY
            RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location Tue, 01/18/05 2:11 PM (permalink)
            quote:
            Originally posted by wanderingjew

            Actually, I might as well put this thread to good use. Does anyone know the origin of red beer? That's beer with tomato juice. I hear it's popular in either in the Midwest or Out West. But not sure exactly where?


            I don't know the origin, but I have a couple of brothers-in-law here in Iowa who drink red beer -- they actually call it bloody beer.

            Cindy
             
              kland01s

              • Total Posts: 2835
              • Joined: 3/14/2003
              • Location: Fox River Valley, IL
              RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location Tue, 01/18/05 2:26 PM (permalink)
              A million years ago when I was in college in Iowa, a friend talked a couple of us in to drivng to North Dakota with him to go home and help his family during wheat harvest. I remember that they would be out all night on the combines and then come in about 9am to groaning tables of food and beer mixed with tomato juice.
               
                SouthHillbilly

                • Total Posts: 295
                • Joined: 1/15/2005
                • Location: Alum Creek, WV
                RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location Tue, 01/18/05 6:11 PM (permalink)
                In Southern WV it's beans and corn bread. . .
                Pinto beans cooked for hours with a big ol chunk of hambone, pork or fatback thrown in. The cornbread has to be sweet.
                Fill a bowl with beans, salt well, crumble the cornbread on top and mix it in, then sprinkle fresh chopped and crunchy raw onions on top.
                Folks make it all different consistencies. It might be like soup or like pudding. Every restaurant featuring country cooking has "beans and cornbread."
                Ya take ta likin it on about the second or third encounter.
                 
                  wanderingjew

                  • Total Posts: 7410
                  • Joined: 1/18/2001
                  • Location: East Greenwich/ Warwick, RI
                  • Roadfood Insider
                  RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location Tue, 01/18/05 6:50 PM (permalink)
                  quote:
                  Originally posted by SouthHillbilly

                  In Southern WV it's beans and corn bread. . .
                  Pinto beans cooked for hours with a big ol chunk of hambone, pork or fatback thrown in. The cornbread has to be sweet.
                  Fill a bowl with beans, salt well, crumble the cornbread on top and mix it in, then sprinkle fresh chopped and crunchy raw onions on top.
                  Folks make it all different consistencies. It might be like soup or like pudding. Every restaurant featuring country cooking has "beans and cornbread."
                  Ya take ta likin it on about the second or third encounter.


                  SouthHillbilly,

                  I found exactly what you're describing on one of my previous trips to the Arkansas Ozarks. I always thought it was an Arkansas thing. I've been to West Virginia (Charleston, Morgantown and Bluefield) but don't recall seeing it on menus there.
                   
                    cheesehead

                    • Total Posts: 48
                    • Joined: 2/13/2004
                    • Location: Janesville, WI
                    RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location Tue, 01/18/05 10:15 PM (permalink)
                    quote:
                    Originally posted by rbpalmer

                    <blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<div style="border: 1px #999999 solid; background-color: #DCDCDC; padding: 4px;">Originally posted by MikeSh

                    <blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<div style="border: 1px #999999 solid; background-color: #DCDCDC; padding: 4px;">Originally posted by Lone Star

                    Bushie - you did not mention Pecos cantelopes, our beautiful, sweet fruits from the arid Pecos Valley. There is something about the soil there that makes them the best in the world.

                    Sorry LoneStar, gotta disagree. THE Best cantalopes come from the central San Jauquin valley of Calif. Especially around Firebaugh and Mendota. There just isn't a better melon then one of these picked ripe and fresh from the field, served chilled.

                    Boy how I miss the produce from Fresno.


                    Never having knowingly had any cantaloupe from the area you mention, I can't make any valid comparison. However, I can't imagine any cantaloupe being significantly better than the Eastern Shore (of Maryland) 'loupes that I have purchased from roadside stands in that area. As you suggest, I think the key is the amount of time the melons spend in transit from the field to the consumer, and the extent to which they are allowed to ripen on the vine.


                    I don't know why, but vegetables that have been irragated, rather than rained on seemed to lose something in the flavor. I have lived in California (Yes, I've had the cantalopes, and the sweet corn, etc from the valley.) and currently live in Wisconsin. The catalopes back here are much larger and sweeter than any I had in Cal.
                     
                      cheesehead

                      • Total Posts: 48
                      • Joined: 2/13/2004
                      • Location: Janesville, WI
                      RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location Tue, 01/18/05 10:45 PM (permalink)
                      quote:
                      Originally posted by chicagostyledog

                      Racine, Wisconsin is famous for SC Johnson and kringles. Kringles are a large delicious butter-layered flaky pastry filled with fruit or nuts and drizzled with a sweet white frosting. Racine Danish kringles are baked daily at the following: O&H Danish Bakery(2 stores), Lehmann's, Larson's and Bendtsen's. Visit www.ohdanishbakery.com to order their products. Racine is also famous for Horlich, the company that made malt powder and tablets. Door County, Wisconsin is known for fish boils. Friday night fish frys are popular throught the state. Milwaukee is known for it's creamy custard at Kopp's and Leon's and fine encased meats from the Usinger Sausage Company. Culver's, a Wisconsin based chain has brought custard and butterburgers into the national limelight, while Sheboygan has been famous for it's brats.


                      Back in the '50's and '60's, most of the fish fries were all you could eat, and were served with either french fries or potato pancakes. Nowadays, the all you can eat fish fries have become somewhat scarce. Fish boils can be found all along the shore-line of the lakes, during the summer. Usinger sausage is to die for as are the Kringles.
                       
                        cheesehead

                        • Total Posts: 48
                        • Joined: 2/13/2004
                        • Location: Janesville, WI
                        RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location Tue, 01/18/05 11:26 PM (permalink)
                        quote:
                        Originally posted by wanderingjew

                        Actually, I might as well put this thread to good use. Does anyone know the origin of red beer? That's beer with tomato juice. I hear it's popular in either in the Midwest or Out West. But not sure exactly where?


                        Here in Wisconsin, this is called a bloody susan.
                         
                          SouthHillbilly

                          • Total Posts: 295
                          • Joined: 1/15/2005
                          • Location: Alum Creek, WV
                          RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location Wed, 01/19/05 1:56 AM (permalink)
                          quote:
                          Originally posted by wanderingjew

                          quote:
                          Originally posted by SouthHillbilly

                          In Southern WV it's beans and corn bread. . .
                          Pinto beans cooked for hours with a big ol chunk of hambone, pork or fatback thrown in. The cornbread has to be sweet.
                          Fill a bowl with beans, salt well, crumble the cornbread on top and mix it in, then sprinkle fresh chopped and crunchy raw onions on top.
                          Folks make it all different consistencies. It might be like soup or like pudding. Every restaurant featuring country cooking has "beans and cornbread."
                          Ya take ta likin it on about the second or third encounter.


                          SouthHillbilly,

                          I found exactly what you're describing on one of my previous trips to the Arkansas Ozarks. I always thought it was an Arkansas thing. I've been to West Virginia (Charleston, Morgantown and Bluefield) but don't recall seeing it on menus there.


                          WanderingJ, you might not find it in Morgantown, but certainly in Charleston and probably Bluefield. It's a very pedestrian dish, so you'd only get it in real country kitchen places. The Corner Rest. on Charleston's west side, The Farm Table in So. Charleston, definitely Southern Kitchen in Kanawha City (reviewed by the Sterns) . . .probably not at any of the downtown places. . . they try to be oh so upscale.
                           
                            mayor al

                            • Total Posts: 15073
                            • Joined: 8/20/2002
                            • Location: Louisville area, Southern Indiana
                            • Roadfood Insider
                            RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location Wed, 01/19/05 8:43 AM (permalink)
                            Eastern Kentucky delivers the "Beans" also. Pintos, or Whites prepared as they do in W V or Arkansas. Several of the small town restaurants that I have sampled serve them on a dinner plate, rather than in a bowl. You'll find the bits of meat mixed in gets a higher percentage than in some 'Bean Soup' receipes.
                            I wonder if we could actually draw a line on the map that displayed the separation between the places that serve Beans like this as "Beans"-the entree (even if they don't use the descriptor words) and those places that refer to the same sort of thing as "Bean Soup"- the appetizer???
                            A lesson in linguistics !
                             
                              sugarlander

                              • Total Posts: 254
                              • Joined: 5/3/2004
                              • Location: Houston, TX
                              RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location Wed, 01/19/05 10:12 AM (permalink)
                              In New Orleans and some other areas of South Louisiana, red beans and rice are common, and supposed to be a Monday--clean out the excesses of the weekend--meal.
                              In the Morgan City area, it's white beans and rice instead. In both of these areas the beans are layered on the rice, often cooked or served with andouille.
                              In the Caribbean, the beans and rice seem to be mixed together.
                               
                                SouthHillbilly

                                • Total Posts: 295
                                • Joined: 1/15/2005
                                • Location: Alum Creek, WV
                                RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location Wed, 01/19/05 11:17 AM (permalink)
                                quote:
                                Originally posted by Al-The Mayor-Bowen

                                Eastern Kentucky delivers the "Beans" also. Pintos, or Whites prepared as they do in W V or Arkansas. Several of the small town restaurants that I have sampled serve them on a dinner plate, rather than in a bowl. You'll find the bits of meat mixed in gets a higher percentage than in some 'Bean Soup' receipes.
                                I wonder if we could actually draw a line on the map that displayed the separation between the places that serve Beans like this as "Beans"-the entree (even if they don't use the descriptor words) and those places that refer to the same sort of thing as "Bean Soup"- the appetizer???
                                A lesson in linguistics !


                                Al, I suspect you could get any number of good hillbilly cooks to argue with you over "bean soup vs. beans". . . but I'm new here so I aint gonna do it!
                                 
                                  tiki

                                  • Total Posts: 4135
                                  • Joined: 7/7/2003
                                  • Location: Rentiesville, OK
                                  RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location Wed, 01/19/05 11:28 AM (permalink)
                                  quote:
                                  Originally posted by SouthHillbilly

                                  quote:
                                  Originally posted by Al-The Mayor-Bowen

                                  Eastern Kentucky delivers the "Beans" also. Pintos, or Whites prepared as they do in W V or Arkansas. Several of the small town restaurants that I have sampled serve them on a dinner plate, rather than in a bowl. You'll find the bits of meat mixed in gets a higher percentage than in some 'Bean Soup' receipes.
                                  I wonder if we could actually draw a line on the map that displayed the separation between the places that serve Beans like this as "Beans"-the entree (even if they don't use the descriptor words) and those places that refer to the same sort of thing as "Bean Soup"- the appetizer???
                                  A lesson in linguistics !---just ask any of the resident BajaOklahomans---oops--i mean Texans!


                                  Al, I suspect you could get any number of good hillbilly cooks to argue with you over "bean soup vs. beans". . . but I'm new here so I aint gonna do it!


                                  Have no fear SOuthhillbilly---argueing over "beans" is a long standing tradition around here!!
                                   
                                    Michael Hoffman

                                    • Total Posts: 17851
                                    • Joined: 7/1/2000
                                    • Location: Gahanna, OH
                                    RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location Wed, 01/19/05 12:29 PM (permalink)
                                    Hey, SouthHillbilly, do you by any chance live in South Hills?
                                     
                                      essvee

                                      • Total Posts: 425
                                      • Joined: 2/14/2002
                                      • Location: Oakland, CA
                                      RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location Wed, 01/19/05 3:26 PM (permalink)
                                      tiki, that story about the little birds and polenta made me cry. Did the preserving in lard soften up the bones and make them edible? How long did the birds simmer? Was the sauce tomato? Did you save and reuse the bird lard? What for?

                                      Oh Og, it must have tasted wonderful. I loved this thread; I hope it goes on forever. Alas, growing up on the shore of CT, I have nothing to add.
                                       
                                        crcoll

                                        • Total Posts: 3
                                        • Joined: 12/7/2004
                                        • Location: Egg Harbor Twp, NJ
                                        RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location Wed, 01/19/05 5:17 PM (permalink)
                                        Philadelphia Area - Taylor Pork Roll - Tangy

                                        I had a distant relative that owned a "Taylor Pork Roll Shop" on the Ocean City, NJ boardwalk and my parents would take us there once a summer to see Gus and sample the pork roll.

                                        Great the following ways:

                                        1) On a potato roll with melted American or Provolone cheese and ketchup
                                        2)On a bagel (I like plain or onion) halved - each half lathered with Philadelphia cream cheese and then a single piece or two or tangy pork roll on each half (open faced).
                                        3) On a Thomas English Muffin, again as with the bagel halved. Each bagel half is buttered and then a single piece of tangy pork roll with melted American Cheese on it.

                                        I double my Lipitor on the days that I eat one of these!!
                                         
                                          SouthHillbilly

                                          • Total Posts: 295
                                          • Joined: 1/15/2005
                                          • Location: Alum Creek, WV
                                          RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location Thu, 01/20/05 12:11 AM (permalink)
                                          quote:
                                          Originally posted by Michael Hoffman

                                          Hey, SouthHillbilly, do you by any chance live in South Hills?


                                          For now. Are you familiar with the area?!
                                           
                                            The Scarlet Pumpernickel

                                            • Total Posts: 32
                                            • Joined: 3/28/2004
                                            • Location: Atlanta, GA
                                            RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location Wed, 02/16/05 9:13 PM (permalink)
                                            quote:
                                            Originally posted by brookquarry

                                            living at the northeast edge of Pennsylvanias lehigh valley ... the one dish unique to our little area is pasties. Introduced by cornish slate quariers who would take them down into the quarry holes as lunch pastys have become the signature cuisine of our area known popularly as the Slate Belt They are on the menu in every diner in the area, are a frequent church fund raiser,and there are even two local retail outlets- Maries pasties- a store front bakery and MR. Pastie which sells fresh pasties locally, and frozen pasties to supermarkets.


                                            I used to be able to find Mr. Pastie(s) at Giant Food in Wheaton MD,
                                            and they were delicious. I'll be in Bucks County PA this summer for a wedding but I won't have time to shop around or even visit South Street for a cheese steak. But if anyone finds them in a store that's close, I will definitely make a side trip. Who cares about the rehearsal dinner anyway?

                                            The Scarlet Pumpernickel
                                             
                                              brookquarry

                                              • Total Posts: 277
                                              • Joined: 2/27/2003
                                              • Location: bangor, PA
                                              RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location Thu, 02/17/05 8:49 AM (permalink)
                                              quote:
                                              Originally posted by The Scarlet Pumpernickel

                                              quote:
                                              Originally posted by brookquarry

                                              living at the northeast edge of Pennsylvanias lehigh valley ... the one dish unique to our little area is pasties. Introduced by cornish slate quariers who would take them down into the quarry holes as lunch pastys have become the signature cuisine of our area known popularly as the Slate Belt They are on the menu in every diner in the area, are a frequent church fund raiser,and there are even two local retail outlets- Maries pasties- a store front bakery and MR. Pastie which sells fresh pasties locally, and frozen pasties to supermarkets.

                                              Your best bet is probably to either email mr. pastie (MrPastie@ee.net) or call them at (6100 863-9091) and find out which Bucks County Supermarkets carry their product.

                                              I used to be able to find Mr. Pastie(s) at Giant Food in Wheaton MD,
                                              and they were delicious. I'll be in Bucks County PA this summer for a wedding but I won't have time to shop around or even visit South Street for a cheese steak. But if anyone finds them in a store that's close, I will definitely make a side trip. Who cares about the rehearsal dinner anyway?

                                              The Scarlet Pumpernickel
                                               
                                                Ace Holleran

                                                • Total Posts: 33
                                                • Joined: 10/1/2003
                                                • Location: Bridgeport, CT
                                                RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location Fri, 02/18/05 4:18 AM (permalink)
                                                Too many favorites:

                                                Al's Italian Beef in ChiTown (order one "hot and wet")
                                                Fried ravioli in St. Loo.
                                                A porterhouse at Peter Luger's, Brooklyn
                                                A Fatburger in El Lay.
                                                Skyline Chili, anywhere near Cincy.
                                                Nick and Vito's pizza, Chicago.
                                                Modern Apizza, New Haven
                                                Pizza at any one of 1,582 different places in CT.
                                                Abbot's Lobster in the Rough, CT
                                                No Name fish house in Beantown.
                                                Goldeye salmon at Hy's Steakhouse, Winnipeg.
                                                Super Duper Weenie in Fairfield, CT, which will spoil you on franks for a lifetime.
                                                Fries at any Papaya Hut, NYC
                                                Arthur Bryant's barbecue, Kansas City
                                                Tuna on the grill at Kemo's in Lahaina, Maui, HI
                                                Sushi at Sakura, Westport, CT
                                                Pasta D'Oro at Capriccio's, NYC
                                                Linguine with white clam sauce at DeRosa's, Wesport, CT
                                                Anything at La Luna, Little Italy, NYC
                                                An omelet at Jackson Hole, NYC
                                                Guacamole (prepared tableside) at Hampton Gardens, Westwood, CA
                                                Cobb salad at Musso and Frank, Hollywood

                                                And finally, a Maker's Mark Manhattan at the Ritz in Boston.

                                                I'll stop here.






                                                 
                                                  EliseT

                                                  • Total Posts: 2849
                                                  • Joined: 7/11/2001
                                                  • Location: L.A, CA
                                                  RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location Sun, 02/20/05 8:21 AM (permalink)
                                                  quote:
                                                  Originally posted by sugarlander

                                                  In New Orleans and some other areas of South Louisiana, red beans and rice are common, and supposed to be a Monday--clean out the excesses of the weekend--meal.
                                                  In the Morgan City area, it's white beans and rice instead. In both of these areas the beans are layered on the rice, often cooked or served with andouille.
                                                  In the Caribbean, the beans and rice seem to be mixed together.


                                                  I heard that red beans and rice are cooked on Monday, because that is wash day, and the pot can simmer unattended while the wash is done. Charming, if not true...
                                                   
                                                    tiki

                                                    • Total Posts: 4135
                                                    • Joined: 7/7/2003
                                                    • Location: Rentiesville, OK
                                                    RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location Sun, 02/20/05 10:01 AM (permalink)
                                                    quote:
                                                    Originally posted by essvee

                                                    tiki, that story about the little birds and polenta made me cry. Did the preserving in lard soften up the bones and make them edible? How long did the birds simmer? Was the sauce tomato? Did you save and reuse the bird lard? What for?

                                                    Oh Og, it must have tasted wonderful. I loved this thread; I hope it goes on forever. Alas, growing up on the shore of CT, I have nothing to add.


                                                    Just realized that i had missed this---didint mean to ignore you!!--No the bones didnt soften--thenlard merely kept the air---and hence any airborne bacteria-away from the birds--and yes she reused it--she would pour off most it when they warmed up,into a can on the stove--that would be used like bacon drippings to fru stuff in. the sauce was a classic long simmered red sauce that was usually started with a BHoston butt being browned in the "sauce pot"before cooking the rest of the sauce and was simmered for DAYS till it was a deep rich burgundy color and the pork just fell apart and became incorporated in the mix. Once the birds were warmed and the excess lard poured of,they were covered in the sauce and simmered about 1/2 hr.
                                                     
                                                      wanderingjew

                                                      • Total Posts: 7410
                                                      • Joined: 1/18/2001
                                                      • Location: East Greenwich/ Warwick, RI
                                                      • Roadfood Insider
                                                      RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location Wed, 06/8/05 12:43 PM (permalink)
                                                      Just reviving a thread, which really, really, really, really, really, really, really really,reeeaaallllyyy, reeallllyy needs to brought back to life.
                                                       
                                                        dbear

                                                        • Total Posts: 131
                                                        • Joined: 3/30/2003
                                                        • Location: Boston, MA
                                                        RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location Wed, 06/8/05 3:07 PM (permalink)

                                                        Love red beans and rice with; sausage (any kind, preferably boudin or andouille; in NE, portugese linguica), pork chops,ham hocks. My favorite is at Lloyds in downtown Baton Rouge.

                                                        db
                                                         
                                                          lstrohl

                                                          • Total Posts: 2
                                                          • Joined: 6/9/2005
                                                          • Location: Fredericksburg, VA
                                                          RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location Thu, 06/9/05 9:43 AM (permalink)
                                                          Fredericksburg, VA - Local traditions:
                                                          Salt fish, usually herring or shad, dredged in milk, rolled in flour and then fried on a grill. My favorite site for this local treat is Dinty Moores, 1607 Princess Anne St. On a cool autumn morning a plate of this served up with sliced tomatoes and a cup of black coffee will make you glad you showed up.
                                                           
                                                            Beer&Snausages

                                                            • Total Posts: 418
                                                            • Joined: 6/26/2005
                                                            • Location: Owings Mills, MD
                                                            RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location Tue, 07/12/05 9:43 AM (permalink)
                                                            In Hawaii, regional cuisine is a mixture of different styles blending influences of Hawaiian, Samoan, Japanese, Chinese, Korean, Potugese, Filipino and others. Look for Saimin (better than Ramen) it's even served at McDonalds, Malasadas, Manapua, Portugese Sweet Bread (sold here as King's Hawaiian Bred). Try the dried & cracked seeds, dried lemon peel, candied mango slices, even the dried cuttlefish.

                                                            One thing that Hawaii had (not sure if they do now) was a banana Twinkie. These were made with bananas and were great. I've heard that Twinkies here on the mainland were made with bananas somewhere in their past.
                                                             
                                                              Online Bookmarks Sharing: Share/Bookmark
                                                              Change Page: << < ..11121314151617 > | Showing page 13 of 17, messages 361 to 390 of 491

                                                              Jump to:

                                                              Current active users

                                                              There are 0 members and 2 guests.

                                                              Icon Legend and Permission

                                                              • New Messages
                                                              • No New Messages
                                                              • Hot Topic w/ New Messages
                                                              • Hot Topic w/o New Messages
                                                              • Locked w/ New Messages
                                                              • Locked w/o New Messages
                                                              • Read Message
                                                              • Post New Thread
                                                              • Reply to message
                                                              • Post New Poll
                                                              • Submit Vote
                                                              • Post reward post
                                                              • Delete my own posts
                                                              • Delete my own threads
                                                              • Rate post

                                                              2000-2014 ASPPlayground.NET Forum Version 3.9
                                                              What is Roadfood?  |   Privacy Policy  |   Contact Roadfood.com   Copyright 2011 - Roadfood.com