Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location

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1bbqboy
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2005/07/12 09:56:09 (permalink)
http://www.kitchenproject.com/history/twinkie.htm
http://www.twinkies.com/mediaroom/twbackgrounder.asp
Rusty246
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2005/07/12 11:18:29 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by SouthHillbilly

In Southern WV it's beans and corn bread. . .
Pinto beans cooked for hours with a big ol chunk of hambone, pork or fatback thrown in. The cornbread has to be sweet.
Fill a bowl with beans, salt well, crumble the cornbread on top and mix it in, then sprinkle fresh chopped and crunchy raw onions on top.
Folks make it all different consistencies. It might be like soup or like pudding. Every restaurant featuring country cooking has "beans and cornbread."
Ya take ta likin it on about the second or third encounter.

This is what I had for supper Sunday evening along with a side of mustard greens. I prefer buttermilk cornbread to sweet though. My Mom will crumble cornbread in a tall glass and pour buttermilk over it and eat it with a spoon.
Beer&Snausages
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2005/07/12 15:16:30 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by bill voss

http://www.kitchenproject.com/history/twinkie.htm
http://www.twinkies.com/mediaroom/twbackgrounder.asp


Bill, those had the banana filling, the ones in Hawaii that I remember the banana part was the cake portion. Must be due to all the bananas that they had there on the islands.
mr chips
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2005/07/15 01:08:48 (permalink)
WJ, this is a fantastic thread. I finally read it all the way through. What an informative and interesting thread.
Two things come to min d when I think of uniquely Oregon cuisines. Oregon produces most U.S. Hazlenuts(I grew up calling them filberts) and local places make creative uses of the Hazlenuts My personal favorite is Burgerville"s use of them in a Hazlenut-Smoked Salmon salad that is my favorite lunch. Burgerville also features a Chocolate Hazlenut milkshake in the winter months.
Oregon also grows a lot of Marionberries and local bakers use them well. Marionberry scones, pancakes, muffins and pies are a proud regional speciality. Tillamook Ice Cream makes an excellent Marionberry pie ice cream
octopus
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2005/07/15 17:15:14 (permalink)
In Upstate Ny, as per a few other posts, Fish Fries are the shiznit. You can't turn around with out walking into one, Bob and Ron's, Ted's, Harbor House. Nick's the list is endless.
There are also a few large immigrant groups upstate, Italian, There are a large ammount of italian places my favorite is the Villa Valente' in Averill Park. And Irish plenty O' Irish places in the albany area, Hurley's in albany, and the best, Burkies in North Troy aka The North End Tavern if its boiled forever and served with beer they probably have it Corned Beef may be the best anywhere (they also do a mean fish fry too)Depends on which night of the week you go in the have daily specials, Corned Beef, Fish Fries, Meat Loaf and some other stuff. Check it out if by some chance you are in the Capitaland area.
ctfrasier
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2005/07/15 18:57:30 (permalink)
Here in Nashville we have a local specialty called hot chicken. It is basically fried chicken covered in spices, usually a sort of rub, served atop white bread. It is hotter than any buffalo wings I've ever had. There's a thread on this site under the chicken forum. If you visit Nashville this is a roadfood must have.
the grillman
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2005/07/15 19:06:38 (permalink)
Here in St. Louis we've got an odd thing called a St Paul sandwich. Many of the lower-rent Chinese joints serve them. It's basically an eggfooyung patty served on white bread with lettuce, tomato, and mayo. I've tried a few, and can't seem to get the hang of them.

Toasted ravioli is everywhere around here; most of it prefab stuff, but like cheap ball park nachos, everyone eats it, no matter how bad it is.

My town is also home to brain sandwiches, served on rye bread with onion, pickle, and mustard, as well as a local barbecue speciality, deep-fried pig snouts.

wanderingjew
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2005/07/15 19:37:37 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by ctfrasier

Here in Nashville we have a local specialty called hot chicken. It is basically fried chicken covered in spices, usually a sort of rub, served atop white bread. It is hotter than any buffalo wings I've ever had. There's a thread on this site under the chicken forum. If you visit Nashville this is a roadfood must have.


I wanted to try that when I was on my last baseball trip in April. I barely had one day in Nashville and the one place listed in the local paper entertainment paper that was closest to downtown was closed on Mondays. Well, there is always next time.
mayor al
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2005/07/15 21:18:22 (permalink)

RE- The St Louis Snouts and brain Sandwiches. At the Henderson BBQ Festival a few weeks ago we checked with the usual vendors we see every year. The guys from St Louis had dropped the brain sandwich from their menu this year. They said the 'Mad Cow Scare' had killed (no pun) any requests for either the sandwich or the scrambled eggs and brains breakfast entree.
As for the Snouts. Getting several snouts soaked in sauce on a burger roll used to be one of our St Louis treats. Can you identify any place in particular that still serves them?
the grillman
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2005/07/15 21:41:51 (permalink)
Mr. Mayor,

It's true that brain sandwiches are endangered due to made cow concerns (probably not that tragic, overall),, I have heard there are a couple bars in south City that still serve them. I personally have only partaken once, that was at home, cooked up by by grandparents. Not my favorite thing.

BBQ snoots (yes, snoots) are still served at C & K Barbecue. It was in one of the Stern's first books, I think. Jennings Station Road, not far from the airport.
mayor al
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2005/07/15 22:11:38 (permalink)

Thanks, Last time I asked about them I spelled it snoots and was corrected by a bunch of folks (maybe they were all Arby's employees?).
We have seen them now and then as 'Fair Food' at some of the rural county fairs in So Illinois and Indiana.
wanderingjew
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2005/08/20 12:03:58 (permalink)
This is what Road food is all about
ellen4641
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2005/08/20 16:57:00 (permalink)
I love this topic, too !

now I've got to backtrack and read the other 14 pages of it !

(sometimes I'll print it out, and take a jog while I'm reading it)

Down here in the Atlantic City area it's sub sandwiches,(on the famous "Atlantic City" bread) and pizza joints. Most of the pizza joints make a decent (sometimes real good) cheesesteak.

But there are too many "bar and grill" type places down here posing as restaurants..........(very heavy on the "bar" part)

I'll walk in and mostly see people smoking and drinking at the bar...
In some places , I'd be about the only one in the "dining" section.
I did'nt like the vibes, and sure enough the food would be mediocre.

But thank goodness, I love to travel, and get out to either LA , Vegas, or south Florida every few months or so (love the LA roadfood scene)......also the NYC and Philly food...

ellen




gailie783
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2005/08/20 17:09:08 (permalink)
i grew up in the suburbs of philadelphia. of course, we had cheeststeaks and hoagies. we also had soft pretzels and "water ice"
ellen4641
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2005/08/20 17:33:05 (permalink)
oops, I forget to mention the soft pretzels.........they truck them in to my Atlantic City area every morning......(and sell them at the local WaWa convenience stores, etc.)

Still does'nt taste as good as when one gets them in the morning fresh from the pretzel factory in south philly !! right out of the oven, over there on washington st.

ellen
MilwFoodlovers
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2005/08/20 20:43:09 (permalink)
Don't forget Manitowoc, Green Bay and Two Rivers claim to fame, The Booyah.
A type of chicken stew with lots more "stuff", it's a staple of fundraisers for little leagues, volunteer firemen, etc.
Here's a recipe but no ones is as good as someone's mother's recipe

Wisconsin Chicken Booyah
This dish is famous in the Fox River Valley region — Green Bay, Wisconsin. Booyah and beer go great together. Booyah King, Bob Baye, of Green Bay, Wisconsin, has been making Booyah since about 1946 in 100-gallon cookers.


1 roasting or stewing chicken (about 4 pounds)
1 pound beef stew meat, with bones
1 pound pork stew meat, with bones
1/2 cup minced parsley
1 tablespoon salt
1 tablespoon rosemary
1 tablespoon thyme
1/2 teaspoon pepper
1/2 teaspoon sage
4 cups quartered potatoes
2 cups chopped onions
2 cups chopped celery
1 cup carrots, cut up
1 cup green beans, cut up
1 cup fresh peas
1 cup skinned, seeded, chopped tomatoes
2 lemons

Put chicken in a deep kettle with the beef and pork. Cover with boiling water. Bring slowly to a simmer, remove scum from the top, and add herbs and seasonings. Simmer very gently, covered, about 1 hour.

Remove chicken and, when cooled, take meat form the bones and cut into pieces. Let beef and pork continue to cook until tender, 45 minutes to an hour more.

Remove and let cool enough to remove meat from bones. Add vegetables to the broth and simmer 5 to 10 minutes.

Grate lemon rind and set aside; remove white pith and seeds from the lemons, chop the pulp, and add to the broth. Taste for seasoning. While vegetables are still crisp, return the meat pieces to the broth to heat through. Serve in large soup bowls and sprinkle with the lemon rind.

Serves 12 to 16.

wanderingjew
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2006/01/06 18:38:56 (permalink)
I am completely amazed at some of the dusty old threads that have somehow been retrieved lately by some new as well as old posters. Thought I would dust off this old beaut and see if any of the new folks have anything to add.
The Scarlet Pumpernickel
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2006/01/06 19:42:27 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by wanderingjew

I am completely amazed at some of the dusty old threads that have somehow been retrieved lately by some new as well as old posters. Thought I would dust off this old beaut and see if any of the new folks have anything to add.


Okay. What the hell was in the Diablo sandwich (from Smokey and
the Bandit)? I know there's a Diablo brand sandwich press,
but the movie had to have come first.

Has anybody had an A-Bomb? It's a Buffalo thing, although the
ones I had were in Orlando. Hot Italian sausage, sliced before
cooking so it would lie flat on the bun, capicolla, provolone,
lettuce, tomato, and onions, with hot wing sauce. Mayo, oil and
vinegar were optional. The place also had beef sandwiches on
salty kummelweck rolls, and malt vinegar for the fries. Curly
fries, a rarity in the early Eighties.

I miss J-C's Wing Shop. I once ate almost seventy-five wings there,
although I lost my enthusiasm after the first fifty. The place was
sold to some Guatemalans and the food went to hell, much like the
neighborhood. At the gas station next door you used to be able to
get White Rock sodas, the ones with the bare-breasted nymph on the
label.

http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0425/is_1_60/ai_77374288
(Possibly NSFW)

The only better soda ever made was Frank's of Philadelphia. I wish
I had a wyshniak right now.

TSP "Gimme a Diablo sandwich and a Dr. Pepper.
And make it snappy, I'm in a goddam hurry!"
roossy90
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2006/01/06 21:16:48 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by gailie783

i grew up in the suburbs of philadelphia. of course, we had cheeststeaks and hoagies. we also had soft pretzels and "water ice"


Ok, ya got me, whats water ice?...
(blonde here)
roossy90
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2006/01/06 21:18:01 (permalink)
Conch fritters and cracked conch sandwiches down in the Florida Keys..
I miss that chewy stuff!
NYNM
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2006/01/06 23:48:18 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by roossy90

quote:
Originally posted by gailie783

i grew up in the suburbs of philadelphia. of course, we had cheeststeaks and hoagies. we also had soft pretzels and "water ice"


Ok, ya got me, whats water ice?...
(blonde here)


Water ice AKA "wooder rice" is what we NYrs call "Italian Ice" (in hard cardboard cup with lid or better, fresh scooped in a paper pleated squeeze cup)aka "Iceys" (tho that term is a bit generic,can be just used for popscilces, too)
roossy90
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2006/01/07 15:33:55 (permalink)
Thanks for enlighting moi!
Tara
ScreenBear
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2006/01/07 19:38:52 (permalink)
I think the Canadian dish...French fries with cheese curd and brown gravy...is spelled Poutine. Talk about density of calories per cubic inch.

This is stick to your ribs food. Pretty good eatin', too.
The Bear
mayor al
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2006/01/07 20:30:57 (permalink)
Screen Bear,
I have to ask... Is that pronounced(Southern Accent) "Poon Tang "? For a minute I was taken back 45 years to my old Army Memories!
roossy90
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2006/01/07 21:20:49 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by Al-The Mayor-Bowen

Screen Bear,
I have to ask... Is that pronounced(Southern Accent) "Poon Tang "? For a minute I was taken back 45 years to my old Army Memories!


Tsk Tsk!
ScreenBear
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2006/01/07 23:25:46 (permalink)
Al,
I think it's pronounced a lot more like the Russian President's name...Putin. Here's a very apt and interesting definition, explanation, etc.

Poutine
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Poutine (pronounced, roughly, poo-tin, or peuh-tsin; is a popular snack consisting of french fries topped with fresh cheese curds and covered with hot gravy.

The curds' freshness is most important as it makes them soft in the warm fries, without completely melting. (When the curds are really fresh they will often squeak between the teeth.) While at first glance the dish may seem similar to American disco fries, poutine with melted cheese, shredded cheese, or cheese slices is not regarded as "genuine" poutine.

It originated in rural Quebec, Canada in the late 1950s and is now popular all over the eastern half of the country, especially in New Brunswick. Several communities claim to be the origin of poutine, including Drummondville, Quebec (by Jean-Pierre Roy) and Victoriaville, Quebec. The most popular tale is the one of Fernand Lachance, from Warwick, Quebec, which claims that poutine was invented in 1957, when a customer ordered fries while waiting for his cheese curds from the Kingsley cheese factory in Kingsley Falls (now in Warwick and bought by Saputo. Lachance is said to have exclaimed ça va faire une maudite poutine ("it will make a hell of a mess"), hence the name. The sauce was allegedly added later, to keep the fries warm longer. Linguists have found no occurrence of the word poutine with this meaning earlier than 1978.

The etymology of the word is a subject of much debate in Quebec. Many believe that it may be an adaptation of the English word pudding, the word being attested from the end of the 19th century in Oscar Dunn's Canadian French dictionary with the meaning of pudding. Still, Quebecer linguists think that the word evolved from Provençal poutingo, which means bad stew, under the phonetic influence of English pudding. It is purely coincidental that the name of the current President of Russia is written and pronounced "Vladimir Poutine" in French.

Poutine is a fast food staple in eastern Canada; it is sold by nearly all fast food chains (such as New York Fries and Harvey's) in the provinces, as well as by small diners and pubs. International chains like McDonalds, A&W, and Burger King now sell poutine across Canada, but their product is scorned by many as being an inferior reproduction. New York Fries has poutine on the menus of its U.S. outlets as well as those in Canada. Popular Quebec restaurants that serve poutine are Chez Ashton, La Belle Province (restaurant), and Lafleur's. Also, poutine is very popular in student cafeterias in high schools and universities.

mr chips
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2006/01/08 00:43:12 (permalink)
Two of my favorite snacks in my ballpark travels were water ices at Citizen's Bank Park in Philadelphis last year and Poutine at Olympic Stadium in Montreal in 2002.
Sandy Thruthegarden
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2006/01/08 18:06:28 (permalink)
Northern Kentucky shares Cincinnati's love of chili/spaghetti (Dixie Chili restaurants) and goetta (Newport, Kentucky's annual Goetta Fest). The quest for the best fried fish sandwich, however, is practically an obsession around here. Northern Kentucky had a large German (Bavarian) Catholic population at one time and that may be the reason that the fish sandwich competition heats up every year at Lent. Lots of Catholic churches have fish fries throughout Lent (the schedule is printed in the Cincinnati Enquirer every year) and there is a competition among the local restaurants. There's a lot of back and forth about cod vs. halibut, rye bread vs. any other kind of bread, beer batter vs. any other batter. Some restaurants that serve wonderful fried fish sandwiches include The Green Derby in Newport, the Greyhound Tavern in Ft. Mitchell, Mr. Herb's in Hebron. Barleycorn's (a local chain) also serves a pretty good fish sandwich.
I've had 'em all but I have to give the edge to Mr. Herb's. We had his fried cod last Friday. Oh, my, was it good.
ScreenBear
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2006/01/08 18:28:22 (permalink)
Sandy,
Do they serve fries of any sort with those fried fish sandwiches? If so, what type?
The Bear
Sandy Thruthegarden
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2006/01/08 19:26:40 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by ScreenBear

Sandy,
Do they serve fries of any sort with those fried fish sandwiches? If so, what type?
The Bear


I don't think they serve fries at most of the church suppers, mostly chips. The restaurants usually offer a choice of potato pancakes, whipped potatoes, or regular (probably frozen ) fries. It's traditional to go with the potato pancake. Mr Herb's carry-out menu says one of their sides is "fried potatoes" but no french fries. I expect that Mr. Herb's serves thinly sliced home fries (heavenly if fried in bacon drippings). I had a side of butter beans on Friday and they were tasty. Also, the traditional bread is usually rye, particularly dark rye or marbled rye (light/dark).
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