Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location

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JuanKerr
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2007/03/09 21:45:41 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by M&M

With cheese curds on top. Called poteen if I'm not mistaken.



I know this is ages old but need to be careful here. Poutine (pronounced poo-tin) (edit, just read Toronto Tips above so I'm echoing him) is what you're thinking of, fries with gravy and cheese curds. Delicious and available all over eastern Canada, predominantly in French speaking areas, as previously discussed.

Poteen (pronounced put-chin) is Irish moonshine, and probably what you'd rather have (well, at least it would wash down the poutine nicely). It's an illegally distilled whiskey/vodka hybrid and not at all for the faint hearted.

I grew up in County Durham, England. Unique foods were probably stottie cakes, a large round semi-leavened bred used for sandwiches or just eaten straight out of the oven and dipped in pease pudding, a kind of solidified pea soup.

Pasties aren't sadly available wherever (Cornish, rather than Welsh) miners settled as there's plenty of west country miners' descendents here in the northern WV panhandle / western PA area and not a pasty in sight. The eastern european pierogies and kielbasa which abound are a more than adequate replacement but I still hanker after a pasty from time to time.
Sandy Thruthegarden
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2007/03/10 08:53:32 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by JuanKerr

quote:
Originally posted by M&M

With cheese curds on top. Called poteen if I'm not mistaken.



I know this is ages old but need to be careful here. Poutine (pronounced poo-tin) (edit, just read Toronto Tips above so I'm echoing him) is what you're thinking of, fries with gravy and cheese curds. Delicious and available all over eastern Canada, predominantly in French speaking areas, as previously discussed.

Poteen (pronounced put-chin) is Irish moonshine, and probably what you'd rather have (well, at least it would wash down the poutine nicely). It's an illegally distilled whiskey/vodka hybrid and not at all for the faint hearted.

I grew up in County Durham, England. Unique foods were probably stottie cakes, a large round semi-leavened bred used for sandwiches or just eaten straight out of the oven and dipped in pease pudding, a kind of solidified pea soup.

Pasties aren't sadly available wherever (Cornish, rather than Welsh) miners settled as there's plenty of west country miners' descendents here in the northern WV panhandle / western PA area and not a pasty in sight. The eastern european pierogies and kielbasa which abound are a more than adequate replacement but I still hanker after a pasty from time to time.


And "putain" (pronounced poo-tan) is a vulgar French word for a lady of the night. So be careful what you order!
mayor al
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2007/03/10 23:06:36 (permalink)

Sandy,

Thanks so much for the link to the Newspaper listing of all the Fish frys! We hope to make use of that in the coming weekends!
AL
Sandy Thruthegarden
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2007/03/11 09:27:01 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by Al-The Mayor-Bowen


Sandy,

Thanks so much for the link to the Newspaper listing of all the Fish frys! We hope to make use of that in the coming weekends!
AL


You're welcome, AL. I'd like to hear which one(s) you visit and what you thought.
lucassal
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2007/05/03 21:35:09 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by Beer&Snausages

In Hawaii, regional cuisine is a mixture of different styles blending influences of Hawaiian, Samoan, Japanese, Chinese, Korean, Potugese, Filipino and others. Look for Saimin (better than Ramen) it's even served at McDonalds, Malasadas, Manapua, Portugese Sweet Bread (sold here as King's Hawaiian Bred). Try the dried & cracked seeds, dried lemon peel, candied mango slices, even the dried cuttlefish.


My favorite Hawaiian speciality was spam musubi. It is about 3" long by 1" wide. Take a slice of Spam, which has been grilled in a teriyaki sauce, and place it on sticky rice, which is the same size. Then it is wrapped in seaweed--a great finger food and snack!
wanderingjew
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2007/10/02 10:17:54 (permalink)
I miss this thread
Thought I would bring it back
Skipcanavan
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2007/10/12 12:06:49 (permalink)
No one has yet mentioned the greatest sandwich ever invented. In southeast Massachusetts ( Taunton, Attleboro, Fall River) some Chinese restaurants serve "chow mein sandwiches". They have been around for close to 100 years and are best served wrapped in wax paper. The best is at The Orient in downtown Taunton.
Also lets not forget clam cakes and Coffee milk...I know Rhode Island!
Louis
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2007/10/24 13:15:50 (permalink)
On the westside of Evansville, Indiana brain sandwiches have always been a tavern staple (Hilltop Inn comes to mind), but they have migrated across the Ohio river into Henderson, Kentucky. The Bon Ton Mini Mart (listed on this site) have them, as well as the Eastgate restaurant a half-mile from downtown.
wanderingjew
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2007/12/28 13:32:25 (permalink)
Every once in a while a great thread needs to be brought back. Today is DEFINETELY one of those days!
MiamiDon
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2007/12/28 14:37:28 (permalink)
Well, here is my $0.02 about Miami:

Conch. Conch salad and conch fritters are big down here.

Key Limes. Real Key Lime pie, made with key limes from the tree in your back yard.

After almost half a century of the Cuban migration, I could transcribe the whole menu from any mom-and-pop cuban diner, and say that it is a local especialite.

Some favorites:

Bistec Palomilla
Moros y Cristianos
Sopa de Frijoles Negros
Vaca Frita
Ropa Vieja
Platanos Maduros
Tostones
Masas de Puerco Fritas

And, of course, Cuban Coffee.

jannyanny
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2008/01/01 18:44:46 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by lleechef

Growing up in western PA my mother used to make something called City Chicken. I believe it was a mixture of pork and veal, cubed, on a small wooden skewer which she floured then browned then braised with mushrooms. Anyone ever heard of this?
jannyanny
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2008/01/01 18:49:55 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by lleechef

Growing up in western PA my mother used to make something called City Chicken. I believe it was a mixture of pork and veal, cubed, on a small wooden skewer which she floured then browned then braised with mushrooms. Anyone ever heard of this?

Yes I am from Pa, I make this myself, there are 2 versions one is chunky and the other is ground. There is no chicken in it, you have a mixture of pork, veal and beef you dip it in an egg mix, bread it put in a stick fry til lightly browned then bake for about an hour MMMMMMM good,I have also made it with venison. why they call it city chicken i have no idea it is a favorite at wedding receptions and showers
planojim
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2008/01/02 14:31:11 (permalink)
we had something similar to that city chicken where I grew up in Michigan, but there we called it "mock chicken"
buffetbuster
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2008/01/03 14:36:34 (permalink)
lleechef-
City chicken was a staple in my household while growing up, too. I didn't realize that was a Western Pa. thing.
NYNM
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2008/01/03 17:14:59 (permalink)
Here I am in NYC and actually struggling to respond to this thread!
First of all, we can get nearly every kind of food here, esp. ethnic. (Some of the regional ones, like burgoo, poutine, even pasties, no - tho we can get empanadas which are similar)

As to NYC foods, like bagels, pizzas, maybe even egg creams, you can get them all over the US esp. for NYC transplants, tho I assume the "original" NYC versions are "best"!

So I ask my fellow NYers: are there foods you can only get in NYC metro area?
Robearjr
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2008/01/04 18:55:27 (permalink)
I've often wondered about the unique food of southern Indiana and the portions of Kentucky on the other side of the river. In brain sandwiches and BBQ mutton, you have two items that really have stay regional. You really can't get those things in other places. Meanwhile, other regional dishes, like coddies, coal fired pizza and conch (nice alliteration huh?) can be found in most states if you are willing to look a little bit.
1bbqboy
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2008/01/04 19:28:02 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by Robearjr

I've often wondered about the unique food of southern Indiana and the portions of Kentucky on the other side of the river. In brain sandwiches and BBQ mutton, you have two items that really have stay regional. You really can't get those things in other places. Meanwhile, other regional dishes, like coddies, coal fired pizza and conch (nice alliteration huh?) can be found in most states if you are willing to look a little bit.

Brains and mutton-you used to be able to get them both in KC
My grandpa loved fried brains and scrambled eggs.
ken8038
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2008/01/05 09:07:44 (permalink)
<<So I ask my fellow NYers: are there foods you can only get in NYC metro area?>>

Good question. Not foods, but NY City is probably the only place where there are still a few home-delivery seltzer companies. And on the Italian side, there's Manhattan Special coffee soda, although that may have a wider distribution these days.

Food wise, there's Grandma Pizza, which seems to have originated on Long Island but has recently made it's way into Brooklyn and Manhattan. It's sort of a thin crust sicilian, but heavy on the tomatoes, light on the cheese and sauce. ---Ken (NJ, but grew up and work in NY)
fischgrape
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2008/03/10 00:31:02 (permalink)
The Beefsteak! The New York Beefsteak is a tradition being maintained by Chef Waldy Malouf at Beacon Restaurant on 56th St. in Manhattan. While New Englanders have their clambakes and Shore Dinners, New Yorkers did it with charred hunks of beef and gallons of beer.

Every diner got an apron (no napkins allowed), a paper hat, and a mug. Potatoes were avoided because they would take up room in the stomach where meat or beer should be. God bless New York.

jf
tamandmik
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2008/03/10 09:52:18 (permalink)
Has anyone heard of the Spedie? I was reading Roadfood the other day, and there was mentioned made in the New York restaurant section about this cuisine, it seems to be local to Binghamton NY. I think it's essentially marinated chunks of lamb on a skewer, that are shoveled into a pita-like bread roll?
Bruce Bilmes and Susan Boyle
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2008/03/10 09:59:06 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by tamandmik

Has anyone heard of the Spedie? I was reading Roadfood the other day, and there was mentioned made in the New York restaurant section about this cuisine, it seems to be local to Binghamton NY. I think it's essentially marinated chunks of lamb on a skewer, that are shoveled into a pita-like bread roll?

Yes, these are terrific! Rarely lamb anymore. Today it's usually pork or, even more often lately (and unfortunately) chicken. Not served on pita, but on slices of soft Italian bread or a sub roll. Veggies are not traditional but the tradition keeps evolving. Probably the most frequently served version would be: chunks of marinated chicken, served on a sub roll with sauteed peppers and onions. The best version is at Sharkey's: chunks of marinated pork, served on skewers next to a stack of sliced bread. Grab the meat with the bread and slide it off the skewer. Then eat. No vegetable, no sauce. But a pitcher of Matt's on the side.
MiamiDon
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2008/03/10 10:37:50 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by Bruce Bilmes & Sue Boyle

quote:
Originally posted by tamandmik

Has anyone heard of the Spedie? I was reading Roadfood the other day, and there was mentioned made in the New York restaurant section about this cuisine, it seems to be local to Binghamton NY. I think it's essentially marinated chunks of lamb on a skewer, that are shoveled into a pita-like bread roll?

Yes, these are terrific! Rarely lamb anymore. Today it's usually pork or, even more often lately (and unfortunately) chicken. Not served on pita, but on slices of soft Italian bread or a sub roll. Veggies are not traditional but the tradition keeps evolving. Probably the most frequently served version would be: chunks of marinated chicken, served on a sub roll with sauteed peppers and onions. The best version is at Sharkey's: chunks of marinated pork, served on skewers next to a stack of sliced bread. Grab the meat with the bread and slide it off the skewer. Then eat. No vegetable, no sauce. But a pitcher of Matt's on the side.


Aren't they a bit dry, served that way?
Bruce Bilmes and Susan Boyle
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2008/03/10 10:42:54 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by MiamiDon

quote:
Originally posted by Bruce Bilmes & Sue Boyle

quote:
Originally posted by tamandmik

Has anyone heard of the Spedie? I was reading Roadfood the other day, and there was mentioned made in the New York restaurant section about this cuisine, it seems to be local to Binghamton NY. I think it's essentially marinated chunks of lamb on a skewer, that are shoveled into a pita-like bread roll?

Yes, these are terrific! Rarely lamb anymore. Today it's usually pork or, even more often lately (and unfortunately) chicken. Not served on pita, but on slices of soft Italian bread or a sub roll. Veggies are not traditional but the tradition keeps evolving. Probably the most frequently served version would be: chunks of marinated chicken, served on a sub roll with sauteed peppers and onions. The best version is at Sharkey's: chunks of marinated pork, served on skewers next to a stack of sliced bread. Grab the meat with the bread and slide it off the skewer. Then eat. No vegetable, no sauce. But a pitcher of Matt's on the side.


Aren't they a bit dry, served that way?

One would think so, I know. But they are juicy, and have so much flavor, that sauce and/or vegetables are not missed. The experience isn't that far removed from eating good smoked brisket. Very focused. On the other hand, it's no sin to doctor them to taste.
bbires
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2008/06/04 22:02:01 (permalink)
What about that ham barbecue from Western Pennsylvania? I made it for a going away party the other night. It was the first time in over 20 years I'd had it. Shaved, boiled ham, Heinz Chili Sauce, brown sugar. Absolutely amazing. The longer it cooks, the better it gets.
mar52
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2008/06/04 22:14:56 (permalink)
Without me going back through the threads, has anyone from California mentioned Date Shakes?

It's neat driving through Palm Springs and the Indio Valley seeing the dates hanging from the palm trees, wrapped to protect them from the animals and bugs.

Rick F.
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2008/08/03 00:15:31 (permalink)
[url='http://www.commercialappeal.com/news/2008/jul/30/fresh-shelled-peas-have-become-an-uncommon/']This[/url] seems to connect. I don't want to hijack, so if anyone knows a better place to post this note, just let me know.
wanderingjew
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2008/08/08 11:04:39 (permalink)
Considering the recent cuisine by state thread
I thought I would bring back this CLASSIC thread as a more "authentic reference"
mayor al
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2008/08/08 11:17:33 (permalink)
Due to the long history of this thread It stays in this forum...But the new one is where it belongs In the Misc Food Discussions.
peppertree
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2011/12/08 09:04:22 (permalink)
You mention Chicago and I will reply with "Italian beef."
Davydd
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2011/12/08 09:14:25 (permalink)
peppertree

You mention Chicago and I will reply with "Italian beef."

...and I will reply deep dish pizza.
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