Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location

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Wiseguy
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/17 01:27:46 (permalink)
Too bad Chicago is known for it's "junk" food.
Like Italian Beef(Scala's),Pan Pizza and Thin Crust Pizza,Chicago Style Hot Dogs(Vienna)And Also Maxwell Street Style Polish Sausage sandwiches.Also breaded steak sandwiches from Ricobene's
covered with marinara sauce and topped with sweet peppers and sometimes cheese.


When I was in Montreal the had Great Hot Dogs that were called "Steamers" that are served on a new enland style toasted bun and can be topped with chili and cheese as well as the french fries with gravy and cheese curds.The place I went to was Frites Doree.
http://english.montrealplus.ca/profile/485517

Iowa has "loose meat" sandwhiches at maid-rite a fast food like place.Pork Tenderloin Sandwiches are very popular too,they have them at Iowa McDonald's.Smitty's is a good place in Des Moines for Pork tenderloin sandwiches.

In Navajo Country(Southwest US) Navajo taco's are popular.Fry bread with chili,lettuce,tomatos,onions,cheese and sour cream.

I wish I coud travel more and try all the great regional fares this country has.Too much food,no time and less money.
#61
Lucky Bishop
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/17 01:45:25 (permalink)
Not least because I've always seen it spelled and pronounced "Nesselrode." It's a Russian/Eastern European thing (undoubtedly why your mom picked it up in Ohio, which has/had a huge Slavic population). Nesslerode cake, the most popular way of serving it, is basically their version of an English plum pudding: chestnuts, glaceed fruit, peels and liquor steamed together as a kind of spongy pudding/cake with a liquor sauce. Nesselrode pudding is the same general ingredients in a custard.
#62
Poverty Pete
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/17 02:05:04 (permalink)
As I was growing up in San Diego, I could go 30 feet offshore with a mask and snorkel and bring back a dozen abalone in just a few minutes. We always complained about the free abalone because you had to pound the steaks before you could eat them. There were also sea urchins by the thousands. When I moved to Hawaii, it was called Vana, then later, when I began eating sushi, it bacame uni. If only I had known. After a beach picnic of abalone steaks, we would take the ab shells home to use as ashtrays. I could feed a group of 15 or 20 on abalone steaks with about 10 minutes work. For those who didn't like abalone, I would also bring in a few lobsters, which I later learned were really langostas.
#63
lleechef
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/17 04:24:31 (permalink)
Hey, KokomoJoe,
Go to Rockport and get a good loaf of Anadama bread, much better than that canned stuff......geeze! Try Wheatberries for a fine loaf, Gina is an excellent baker.
#64
ocdreamr
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/17 09:13:18 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by Ort. Carlton.

Dearfolk,
Has anyone ever heard of Nestlerode Pudding? My Mother was originally from Ohio, and she extolled it as a local specialty around where she grew up (Oxford/Middletown/Hamilton). Apparently it didn't travel very far, because I've seen almost no reference to it anywhere. Has anyone got a recipe/story/anecdote/antedote?
Not Pudding Y'all On, Ort. Carlton, Along The Nestle Road To Athens, Georgia.
P. S. There is not apparently any connection to the food purveyor Nestle'... pure happenstance.


Ort,
Couldn't tell you what's in it but have heard of it before. for some reason I'm thinking English but not sure. If I get stuck in the basement the next couple of days I search through my cookbooks & see if I can find a recipe. I have several regional cookbooks from Ohio & I might find it there.

Karen that OCDreamr that might have Ocean front property sooner than I thought!!
#65
Howard Baratz
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/17 10:14:53 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by Ort. Carlton.

Dearfolk,
Has anyone ever heard of Nestlerode Pudding? My Mother was originally from Ohio, and she extolled it as a local specialty around where she grew up (Oxford/Middletown/Hamilton). Apparently it didn't travel very far, because I've seen almost no reference to it anywhere. Has anyone got a recipe/story/anecdote/antedote?
Not Pudding Y'all On, Ort. Carlton, Along The Nestle Road To Athens, Georgia.
P. S. There is not apparently any connection to the food purveyor Nestle'... pure happenstance.


Ort.,

Here is some Nesselrode info I swiped off of the web:

Nesselrode Pudding
From The Penguin Book of Food and Drink (Canada, UK), edited by Paul Levy. Recipe from Jane Grigson.

An iced pudding flavoured with chestnuts and dried fruit was invented by Monsieur Mony, chef for many years to the Russian diplomat, Count Nesselrode, in Paris. He passed the recipe on to Jules Goufflé who published it in his Livre de Cuisine of 1867. Glacé fruit and peel were a further embellishment to the Nesselrode by the time Proust was old enough to notice such things.

Ingredients:

1 Tbsp sugar
60 g (2 oz) mixed currants and raisins
40 g (2 oz) mixed glacé fruits, angelica, candied orange peel
Maraschino liqueur (or Madeira, Marsala, etc.)
300 ml (10 fl oz) single (whipping) cream
vanilla pod
4 large egg yolks
125 g (4 oz) sweetened chestnut purée, or unsweetened with vanilla
sugar to taste
300 ml (10 fl oz) double cream

Instructions:

Bring the sugar to the boil with 3 Tbsp of hot water and simmer the dried fruit in this syrup for a minute. Remove from the heat and leave to cool. Put in a basin with the chopped glacé fruits etc., and add enough Maraschino to cover. Leave several hours or overnight.

Bring single cream to the boil slowly with the vanilla pod, and pour on to the beaten egg yolks, whisking. Return to the pan and cook slowly, without allowing the custard to boil, until it thickens. Cool slightly, then strain on to the fruits, and add the chestnut purée (it will mix more easily if the custard is still tepid). Whip the double cream, fold into the chestnut mixture, and freeze in the usual way at the lowest possible temperature.

Turn out and decorate with the marrons glacés and whipped cream, if you like: Monsieur Mony served a cream and egg custard, chilled and flavoured with Maraschino, but the habit of serving a custard sauce with ices is not popular any more.

#66
Bushie
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/17 17:46:28 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by wanderingjew


I remember the first time I had frito pie. I was en route moving from Seattle to Pittsburgh back in January '96... Well everything was fine until I hit Oklahoma City. The day after I arrived I hit a snow storm with 15 degree temperatures and 30 mph winds. Of course in Oklahoma, no one ever heard of sand, salt and snow plows... I tried the frito pie, and If I can recall, it had raw onions in them. It was quite good.

Wanderingjew, I always chop up raw onions when I make Frito Pie at home, because I really like it that way. (We just spoon leftover chili in a bowl filled with Fritos, then top with grated cheddar, onions, and hot pepper sauce. )

And, you are absolutely correct about Oklahoma and snow plows. I know the state owns them, because I've seen them parked in the Maintenance Centers by the highways. However, I've never actually seen one in use there.

I believe I've driven through every snow/ice storm Oklahoma has had in the last 20 years. In fact, you and I probably passed each other during your trip in '96. I have many things I could say about the Oklahoma highway department, but...
#67
wanderingjew
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/17 18:10:00 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by Bushie

Originally posted by wanderingjew



I believe I've driven through every snow/ice storm Oklahoma has had in the last 20 years. In fact, you and I probably passed each other during your trip in '96. I have many things I could say about the Oklahoma highway department, but...


I was the guy in the Green Tercel in the left lane of I-44 passing all the semi's.
#68
Bushie
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/17 18:13:18 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by wanderingjew


I was the guy in the Green Tercel in the left lane of I-44 passing all the semi's.


Ah, yes, I remember seeing you. Many of those semis were not too hard to pass, considering they were ditched...
#69
Grizzly
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/17 18:27:43 (permalink)
Western Iowa - pork tenderloin sandwiches
fresh ham
fresh boiled sweet corn (right after harvest before the sugar has turned to starch)
cheesy joes (a maid-rite made with Velvetta)
sour cream raisin pie
fried catfish
Maytag Blue Cheese (crumbled on salads)
three bean salad (green, wax, kidney)
cucumber salad
strawberry rhubarb pie
Runzas (German-Russian sandwich:ground beef, cabbage, spices; baked inside dough)
Iowa Pork Chops (thick cut chops 2-3 inches thick)
#70
Rick F.
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/17 18:28:50 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by KimChee43

Just remembered two more from the Chicago area...Shrimp de Jonghe and Chicken Vesuvio.
Mediterranean Shrimp de Jonghe (sp?) was served at the Sheraton Palace Garden Room in 1962.
#71
KimChee43
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/17 18:34:56 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by wanderingjew

quote:
Originally posted by Bushie

Originally posted by wanderingjew



I believe I've driven through every snow/ice storm Oklahoma has had in the last 20 years. In fact, you and I probably passed each other during your trip in '96. I have many things I could say about the Oklahoma highway department, but...


I was the guy in the Green Tercel in the left lane of I-44 passing all the semi's.


WANDERINGJEW: Must be been something magic about a Tercel and a snowstorm. My husband had a little blue Tercel hatchback. That car beat out all of the SUVs, semi's, you name it, when it came to bad winter weather. He'd cruise on by many of them that were stuck in a ditch on his way home from work.
#72
Wiseguy
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/17 19:30:47 (permalink)
I forgot to mention Maytag Blue Cheese in Newton,Iowa as Grizzly mentioned.

Another variation of Frito pie that I have heard of,but not sure where originated, is "walking tacos". You take chili and all the other obvious ingredients and put them into small bags of Fritos and then eat out of the bag.
#73
EdSails
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/17 20:51:15 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by Poverty Pete

As I was growing up in San Diego, I could go 30 feet offshore with a mask and snorkel and bring back a dozen abalone in just a few minutes. We always complained about the free abalone because you had to pound the steaks before you could eat them. There were also sea urchins by the thousands. When I moved to Hawaii, it was called Vana, then later, when I began eating sushi, it bacame uni. If only I had known. After a beach picnic of abalone steaks, we would take the ab shells home to use as ashtrays. I could feed a group of 15 or 20 on abalone steaks with about 10 minutes work. For those who didn't like abalone, I would also bring in a few lobsters, which I later learned were really langostas.


It sounds like the days when I used to catch eating-sized crabs in Mission Bay. Ah, those were the days......
#74
Judy
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/17 21:16:48 (permalink)
We will be travling from Tampa Fl to the West Coast sometime around Feb 1st of 2004.We will be travling the southern route, primarily Rt 10. Were tired of Chain rests and am looking for all types of GOOD food along the way.Any suggestions would greatly be appreciated.
#75
PCC
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/17 22:33:07 (permalink)
Blue Grass area of Kentucky - Country Ham on biscuits, Burgoo, Hot Browns, Beer Cheese Spread, Benedictine Spread, Chess Pie, Kentucky Jam Cake, Jeff Davis Pie
#76
emmymom
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/17 22:50:53 (permalink)
My mom made us City Chicken occasionally when I was a kid - veal cubes on a skewer, breaded and fried like chicken, then braised a little so it was soft. Yum! I read recently in American Food History that farmers used to thin their herds in the fall, and so that's how veal got to be an economy meat. Not true any more, sad to say...

As for Nesselrode pie, it's mentioned and a recipe given on Arthur Schwartz's website, www.thefoodmaven.com. Arthur has a daily food talk radio show in NYC. I was a big fan when I lived there. You can find his recipe for Nesselrode pie under Favorite Radio Recipes.

I've lived in Central PA, Philadelphia, and NYC, and each has its regional specialties. From my Pennsylvania Dutch family background: Peach Kuchen, the world's best dessert: peaches in a cinnamon syrup covered with cream custard, on a shortbread base. Also: apple butter on fresh cottage cheese. Shoofly pie (the wet-bottom kind.) Scrapple, fried crispy brown and served with maple syrup. Ring bologna. Lebanon bologna (we called it "summer sausage.") Red beet eggs (yecchh. Ok, so they weren't all wonderful.)Corn relish and chow chow.

From Philly, in my college days: cheese steaks! hoagies! cheese steak hoagies! soft pretzels with mustard. Snapper soup with sherry.

And from NY : knishes, bialys (a wonderful kind of flat onion roll that I've found nowhere else.) Frito pie at the Cowgirl Hall of Fame (yes, in Manhattan - go figure.) Nathan's franks (real garlicky, the best I ever ate...the supermarket kind don't measure up to the ones from the orignal stand in Coney Island.) The best souvlaki sandwiches I've ever had, from the hot dog cart around the corner from my job!

Made myself hungry writing all this, but that's part of the fun.
#77
Lucky Bishop
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/17 23:41:49 (permalink)
Bialys are fairly easy to find at any bagel bakery that does a proper boiled bagel, so they're not a strictly NY thing. It seems to be traditional that most places do them only on the weekend.
#78
wanderingjew
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/18 09:50:02 (permalink)
Thought I would add to my list. I've already included Long Island NY where I grew up. Now I'll move onto Albuquerque where I lived briefly for 6 months shortly after graduating from college in 1987. Of course New Mexican reigns supreme in New Mexico. My favorites were Carne Adovada Burritos. Green Chili Cheeseburgers, and Blue Corn Enchiladas. Huevos Rancheros for breakfast. It was amazing how most restaurants served warm fresh tortillas which was included with your breakfast. Sopapillas were also something to look forward to. Fried dough, very light and airy served with honey. Can't find anything like it here on the east coast, although now that I'm in Rhode Island, we have doughboys, but we'll talk about that later. Also the bizochito cookies (don't know if I spelled that right??) cookies flavored with anise. Finally can't forget Pinon Nuts. Used to buy these buy the bag and they would be gone within a few minutes. Of course I had to share! Sure brings back memories.
#79
Liketoeat
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/18 12:13:51 (permalink)
Can't think of any foods really unique to our region unless the region is very broadly defined as pretty much the entire south. With that definition I'd include many vegetables -tomatoes; sweet potatoes; okra; corn; beets; cukes; onions; greens, bean, peas, squash of all types; and am sure I'm overlooking other veggies which should be listed. Would also include cornbread, biscuits, jellies of all sorts and preserves (particularly pear), grits, hog meat of all types, red-eye gravy, fried chicken and chicken & dumplings; fried fish - cat, crappie, bream; barbecue, wildlife - venison, squirrel, and (now unfortunately mostly a thing of the past) quail. While not my favorite, guess the dessert most identified with the region would be pecan pie, plus (more to my taste) fruit cobblers.
#80
wanderingjew
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/18 12:26:26 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by Liketoeat

Can't think of any foods really unique to our region unless the region is very broadly defined as pretty much the entire south.


I'm not sure what part of Arkansas you are in, but when I visited Little Rock, Mountain View and Hot Springs four years ago, I noticed a few things unique about Arkansas. First of all alot of Catfish Parlors, more so than other states in the South. Also I noticed that BBQ is usually served with Pit Potatos something I haven't seen outside of Arkansas. Finally Beans and Corn Bread served with raw onion seem to be popular on many Arkansas menus. Let me know if I'm wrong, but these food items seemed to stand out .
#81
Liketoeat
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/18 13:08:33 (permalink)
Wandering, I'm over in eastern Ark. south of Memphis, TN, & near the Mississippi River - a totally different region from the northern and western sections of the state (splitting state on diagonal from northeast to southwest corner). There are indeed lots of catfish restaurants throughout the entire state, and beans-onions-cornbread is a frequent restaurant luncheon offering, but I didn't consider them unique to this part of the state or even to the entire state from having so frequently seen both throughout all the southeast (and even in southern Illinois). As to whether they are more frequently found here than in these other areas, I don't know, but don't believe so.

I'm curious as to the "pit potatoes" you mention having found served with barbecue. I can't think what that is; maybe its something I've not experienced. Have found potato salad and fried potatoes frequently served with barbecue in restaurants, and a separate barbecue dish is a baked potato stuffed with barbecue. Also popular with home barbecue and steak are foil wrapped potatoes and foil wrapped onions cooked along with the meats, but can't recall ever seeing them served with barbecue in a restaurant. Please let me know more about the pit potatoes. You've got my curiousity aroused on this one. Thanks.
#82
wanderingjew
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/18 13:23:49 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by Liketoeat

Please let me know more about the pit potatoes. You've got my curiousity aroused on this one. Thanks.


I had the Pit Potatos in the Hot Springs area, specifically at Stubby's BBQ. In fact they were really good. They have the smoke infused taste of the BBQ Pit. As far as the beans n cornbread, I really haven't seen that outside of Arkansas. I believe I saw this mostly in the Mountain View Area so I'm wondering if this is an "Ozark thing". As far as catfish parlors are concerned, of course they are throughout the south, however I've never seen so many of them concentrated in a specific area, particularly Little Rock and vicinity.
#83
Liketoeat
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/18 13:45:36 (permalink)
Thanks for info, wandering. The pit potato is just something I've never seen but will be anxious to try. Sounds good. Don't believe its served in too many barbecue spots in the state as I've eaten in lots of them (tho not Stubby's in Hot Springs) and have never seen it. Is it like a whole baked potato or is it some type cubed or sliced potato dish? Whatever, assume its cooked along with the barbecue to get that smoke flavor infusion. As for the beans-onion-cornbread lunch offering, no, its not just an "Ozark thing". One little restaurant about 20 miles from the house offers it daily, and, as said, have seen it frequently offered elsewhere in the state and throughout the South. Have never thought of the Little Rock area as having more catfish places than other sections of the state or than of northern Louisiana, south Alabama, or the entire state of Mississippi. If anything, I'd guess that Mississippi has more catfish places than any other state, but don't know that for sure. Whatever, and how ever many, thank goodness for all of them, for I really enjoy catfish, and that is something I much prefer to eat out rather than fooling with cooking at home.
#84
Mayhaw Man
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/18 13:47:40 (permalink)
One of the greatest bandleaders of the twentieth century and a native of Brinkley, Ark., Louis Jordan (very, very near Liketoeat's hometown of Marvell (which incidentally is also the hometown of Levon Helm of "The Band")) had a song with a title involving the very subject of the last two posts. He also wrote lots and lots of songs involving food.

Beans and Cornbread,
Beans and Cornbread had a fight.
Beans knocked Cornbread out of sight.
Cornbread said, "Now that's alright, meet me on the corner tomorrow
night."
"I'll be ready, I'll be ready tomorrow night,"
That's what Beans said to Cornbread . "I'll be ready tomorrow night...."
#85
Michael Hoffman
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/18 13:59:15 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by Ort. Carlton.

Dearfolk,
Has anyone ever heard of Nestlerode Pudding? My Mother was originally from Ohio, and she extolled it as a local specialty around where she grew up (Oxford/Middletown/Hamilton). Apparently it didn't travel very far, because I've seen almost no reference to it anywhere. Has anyone got a recipe/story/anecdote/antedote?
Not Pudding Y'all On, Ort. Carlton, Along The Nestle Road To Athens, Georgia.
P. S. There is not apparently any connection to the food purveyor Nestle'... pure happenstance.

Here are two recipes.

Nesselrode Pudding:

3 cups milk
1/2 teaspoon salt
11/2 cups sugar
1 pint thin cream
Yolks 5 eggs
1/4 cup pineapple syrup
11/2 cups French Marrons (Chestnuts glazed with sugar or preserved in vanilla-flavored syrup.)


Make custard of first four ingredients, strain, cool, add cream, pineapple syrup, and marrons forced through a purée strainer; then freeze. Line a two-quart melon mould with part of mixture; to remainder add one-half cup candied fruit cut in small pieces, one-quarter cup Sultana raisins, and six marrons broken in pieces, first soaked several hours in Maraschino syrup. Fill mould, cover, pack in salt and ice, and let stand two hours. Serve with whipped cream, sweetened and flavored with Maraschino syrup.

NESSELRODE PUDDING

5 Eggs
1/2 c Sugar
1 1/2 tb Gelatin
1/4 c Water
2 c Whipping cream
2 ts Vanilla
2 c Sweetened chestnut puree
5 oz Chopped candied chestnuts
1 Pie shell

WARM THE EGGS IN A DOUBLE BOILER. Whip them with an
electric mixer, and gradually beat in the sugar. Beat
until the mixture is thickened and forms soft peaks.
Soften the gelatin in the water and then dissolve over
hot water. Beat the cream to soft peaks. Fold the
gelatin and vanilla into the eggs and then fold in the
whipped cream. Fold in the chestnut puree and the
candied chestnuts. Fill the crust and refrigerate to
set. Top with sweetened whipped cream.
#86
Lucky Bishop
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/18 14:55:29 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by wanderingjew

Now I'll move onto Albuquerque where I lived briefly for 6 months shortly after graduating from college in 1987. Of course Mexican reigns supreme in New Mexico. My favorites were Carne Adovada Burritos. Green Chili Cheeseburgers, and Blue Corn Enchiladas. Huevos Rancheros for breakfast. It was amazing how most restaurants served warm fresh tortillas which was included with your breakfast. Sopapillas were also something to look forward to. Fried dough, very light and airy served with honey. Can't find anything like it here on the east coast, although now that I'm in Rhode Island, we have doughboys, but we'll talk about that later. Also the bizochito cookies (don't know if I spelled that right??) cookies flavored with anise. Finally can't forget Pinon Nuts.


Speaking as someone who spent his entire adult life up until last year living in New Mexico (and who spent a good chunk of that time writing about local food), I feel the need to clear up a common misconception: very little that you described in that post is "Mexican." New Mexican cuisine is an entirely different creature from Mexican cuisine, and differs substantially from what's been dubbed (within the last 25 or 30 years) "Tex-Mex" as well. New Mexican food tends to be hotter than both (green chile is the staple of the New Mexican diet, and the key ingredient of roasted, chopped green chile is all but unknown in traditional Mexican and Tex-Mex food), lighter than Tex-Mex, but not as light as Mexican. Pork is the dominant meat, unlike beef in Tex-Mex and a combo of pork, chicken, goat and (on the coasts) seafood in Mexican.

It's a fine line between Mexican and New Mexican sometimes, and talking about the differences is an easy way to start an argument in Albuquerque or Roswell, but the local cuisine is a strong point of regional pride, and I felt the need to clarify.
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/18 14:57:50 (permalink)
Mayhaw, though I know of, I really don't know much about Louis Jordan of Brinkley. Also, I'm totally unfamiliar with the "Beans and Cornbread" song. However, I grew up with Levon Helm, tho I was several years older. All during junior high and high school, whenever we had any entertainment in a "school assembly" it was usually Levon and his sister Linda (believe was her name). Little did realize then the musician he'd become. Also grew up listening to Sonny Boy Williamson (and I'm never sure if it was the first or the second) and his band two or three Saturdays a year when they would stop at my dad's country store (and every Saturday at some group of country stores throughout east central Ark.) and play for half hour to hour out of the empty trailer of an Interstate Grocer Co. delivery truck . Interstate was distributor of King Biscuit Flour and Sonny Boy Meal and was sponsor of Sonny Boy and his radio program ("King Biscuit Blues Hour") back then. Some version of this program (blues recordings) is still broadcast daily from Delta Cultural Center in Helena and claims to hold the record for longest continuous running radio program of some sort in the country.

From the above you can probably tell that blues "really ain't my thing", but Helena, our county seat 20 miles away, does host an anuual "King Biscuit Blues Festival" (this year to be Oct. 9 -11; has websie www.kingbiscuitfest.org ). Though as said, I'm really not into blues music, this must be a pretty good blues festival from comments of folks who are, and it can be fun to sit on the Mississippi River levee in the sunshine (if we are having some great Oct. weather) and listen to some of the music and just watch the crowds. (If weather is bad as seems frequently is the case, then its a bummer). Last time was there at night were too many folks out and too much drinking for my taste. Think it must overall be a pretty good time for hellraisers. One kind of unusual thing is the great number of attendees who camp out in campers and tents in an area specifically set up for that purpose in a park right along the Mississippi River. . Anyone attending can see some prime examples of the Delta's small towns decaying, unfortunatley commonplace throughout the entire Delta. While the festival does include a barbecue contest, most food available is from commercial vendors' trailers or from local church, school, civic organizations' booths set up along Cherry St. As mentioned, I sometimes go down on a Sat. afternoon, but will not be there at all this year due to other commitments at that time.
#88
wanderingjew
Sirloin
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/18 15:04:56 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by Lucky Bishop


It's a fine line between Mexican and New Mexican sometimes, and talking about the differences is an easy way to start an argument in Albuquerque or Roswell, but the local cuisine is a strong point of regional pride, and I felt the need to clarify.


I knew I was going to receive flack for that. Already made the correction.
#89
wanderingjew
Sirloin
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/18 15:09:49 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by Liketoeat

Is it like a whole baked potato or is it some type cubed or sliced potato dish?


It's a whole baked potato cooked in the pit along with the "Q".

Another item I forgot to mention which I haven't seen outside Arkansas is Fried Pie. Not to say you can't find it elsewher in the south, I just haven't seen it elsewhere.
#90
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