Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location

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Liketoeat
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/18 15:19:50 (permalink)
Thanks for the additional info re the pit potato, wandering. That's pretty much what I guessed it to be. I'll surely be anxious to try it. As for the fried pies, I've seen them in some restaurants in both Arkansas and other southern states, but really don't recall finding them too frequently anywhere; certainly nothing like regular baked pies. My grandmother was a master at fried pies and you still find some cooks who prepare them in their homes, though they seem to have unfortunately died out in our family with my grandmother.
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KimChee43
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/18 17:39:14 (permalink)
My husband and I used to go on fishing trips together to Canada b.c. (before child). We used to hire a guide to take us out in the boat all day. Every guide made what they called a "Shore Lunch" up there--the guide would build a campfire, filet some of the fresh caught walleye, bread it and then cook it in a skillet over the fire. In the same skillet, he'd saute sliced potatoes with chopped onions. A can of pork & beans was opened and then placed sort of in the flames to heat. To drink, campfire coffee. The menu never varied. Is "Shore Lunch" strictly a Canadian thing?
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Bushie
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/18 23:11:10 (permalink)
WJ and LTE:

Beans and cornbread were a staple of my youth in South East Missouri. It was mostly a winter meal, but when Mom cooked beans (always pintos btw) in the summer, we'd just have them with raw onion chunks and sliced tomatoes from the garden.

In the colder months, she'd always serve fried taters & onions (cooked in one of her iron skillets, of course) with that meal.

To this day, I can't think of a better meal than pinto beans cooked the right way, sided with REAL cornbread and plenty of butter.

Call me a hick, but I'll wear that moniker with pride.
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PCC
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/18 23:23:12 (permalink)
When you all are talking about beans and cornbread, are you talking about pinto beans? I grew up in eastern KY and the steady diet was soup(pinto) beans and cornbread (cornbread made with white corn meal and no sugar) in the winter and green beans (white half runners) and corn bread in the summer. You can still get a bowl of soup beans and cornbread to crumble in (along with onion) in restaurants in eastern KY. But you can also get it in the Cracker Barrel Restaurant chain and they serve sides of dill pickle relish and onion.
You can still get fried pies in restaurants in eastern KY too.
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Liketoeat
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/19 00:27:46 (permalink)
Bushie, there is nothing better than a mess of beans and cornbread except for a mess of field peas, any kind but preferably purple hulls, and cornbread. Crumble that cornbread into the peas and potlikker and stir a little vinegar into it so that it kinda "clabbers" and then dig in and enjoy. You mention the pintos, which are great, but most of the bean-onion-cornbread lunches served in restaurants in these parts are white (Great Northern or less likely Navy ) beans. You and PCC mention "real" cornbread and cornbread with no sugar; both those conditions are givens. Deliver me from "cake" cornbread - the kind made with more flour and sugar than meal. And you are right, too, PCC, about green beans being good (had some delicious ones at a potluck tonight brought by a lady who does about the best green beans I've ever eaten). Another thing I grew up on and loved, but somehow just don't often eat now, is lima beans. We always probably grew more limas than any other kind of beans or peas when I was a kid, but somehow now just kind of "forget" them. Still like them, though, for had some really delicious ones (both baby limas and the big speckled butterbeans) for first time in don't know at a potluck luncheon at a meeting this past Saturday.
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lleechef
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/19 08:44:08 (permalink)
Bushie, When you say "pinto beans cooked the right way" I'd like to know how exactly they were cooked. With some kind of pork? Are they more like a soup or not that much liquid? I use pinto beans a lot and would like to know how y'all cook 'em up in the south.
Thank you,
Deprived Yankee Girl
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Bushie
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/19 08:44:12 (permalink)
Liketoeat, you are correct. I mostly remember the pintos, but after you mentioned the white beans, I remembered that we did have Navy beans every now and then. Down here, we have a choice of pintos or black beans (I don't remember ever seeing Navys available in a restaurant here), so I rarely even think of those little guys. Thanks for reminding me; I'm going to make a pot of Navys soon!
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Mayhaw Man
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/19 08:46:04 (permalink)
Beans,greens, and cornbread (and liver).

During my wife's pregnancy with our oldest child she was anemic. Vitamins weren't helping and the midwife and her obgyn both suggested trying to ingest the vitamins with greens and liver. Now, all of these things are things that I like and eat regularly, but boy oh boy, when they get to be a staple, and I mean an everyday staple, you start to thank the Lord you aren't living in the rural South farming shares in the twenties and beans, greens, and cornbread were all your family had to eat. Variety is definitly the spice of life.

Incidentally, not only did this treatment solve the problem, but our oldest was born 10 lb 2oz and now, at age 14, he is 6'1" tall and skinny as a bean pole. Maybe we could have backed down on the liver?

All that being said....guess what Mayhaw Man and Family had last night? Lady Peas (with snaps, because I like 'em that way), cornbread (pones made in cast iron tins that, according to family lore, are over 125 years old), and mustard greens with smoked ham and red bell pepper. MMMMMMM. Maybe it's genetic, but I love this stuff.
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Art413
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/19 08:58:16 (permalink)
Great topic. I would like to tell you about a great and unique restaurant in Owego NY. It is called "The Jail". It is in the old Tioga County jail and you can acctualy eat in one of the cells. Tables for four are set up in the small cells with larger partys int the bigger cells. The food is excellent and very reasonably price. I had Jerk Scallops and two sides, garlic redskinned mash potatoes and blake beans for $10.95. Appitizers run from$3.50 to $8.00.
This is a very unique experience and the Seneca Wine trails are just a short distance away. Try it you will like it.
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wanderingjew
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/19 09:36:58 (permalink)
Today, we will talk about Seattle WA and the Pacific NW. I lived in Seattle from 1992 through early 1996. Seafood, Asian cuisine, microbrews and strong coffee seem to dominate. First of all salmon is King. Either White King or Red King. It can be baked, grilled, broiled, alder smoked bbq'd or dried into jerkey. White King Smoked Salmon was my favorite. In the summer it wasn't unusual to throw salmon on the grill instead of hot dogs or hamburgers. Fish n Chips especially halibut n chips also reign supreme. Some of the best fish n chips I've ever had equal to or better than New England and don't forget to dip the fries in tartar sauce like all the locals do. Some of the local festivals in downtown Seattle would offer grilled halibut on a bun with tarter sauce. Fresh greens were also popular along with gigantic loaded potatos loaded with cheese, onions. butter, sour cream and either bacon or corned beef. Apparently the history of stuffed potato skins began in the Pacific NW. Scones (the english kind, not the fry bread stuff from Utah) spread it's way eastward from Seattle. The Puyallup fair would offer fresh hot scones with rasberry jam and butter. Scones are commonly served with breakfast at most Seattle Restaurants the same way bagels, biscuits, tortillas, muffins and cinammon rolls are served in other parts of the country. Finally most meals in Seattle are topped off with blackberry ice cream or blackberry cobbler.
Bushie
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/19 09:52:25 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by lleechef

Bushie, When you say "pinto beans cooked the right way" I'd like to know how exactly they were cooked. With some kind of pork? Are they more like a soup or not that much liquid? I use pinto beans a lot and would like to know how y'all cook 'em up in the south.
Thank you,
Deprived Yankee Girl

Hi, lleechef. The "right way" to me is to keep it simple. I cook pintos using only fresh-ground black pepper and a big piece of salt pork (or ham bone if we've recently had a ham), then salt to taste after they've cooked awhile. I cook them for many hours, first covered, then after a few hours I take the lid off. This allows the juice to thicken a little. I don't want them "sludgey", but I don't want the juice thin, either. I add enough liquid (usually just water, but chicken broth doesn't hurt) along the way to keep them from getting gloppy.

Down here in Tejas, almost everyone I know makes pintos with tomatoes (or Rotel), onions, and various chili seasonings. I guess that's traditional around these parts, but I much prefer them cooked "my way".

The only concession I'll make it that sometimes I'll chop up some fresh (not pickled) jalapenos and cook those in there.

A few years ago at a "guy's weekend" down on the Frio, I made a big pot to have with our dinner. Everyone raved about the beans, and one of my native Texan buddies said they were the best he'd ever had. I don't think he'd ever really tasted the natural "bean" flavor before!
Alirush
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/19 10:56:43 (permalink)
I've noticed the pit 'tater phenomenon around our area of AR (Hot Springs). Here are some important distinctions:

Most BBQ places around Hot Springs have pit taters. However, it's good to know that if you order a pit tater at, say, Stubby's, you're going to get something totally different than if you order pit taters at Echo Valley BBQ. Stubby's has the "traditional" pit tater - defined by an earlier roadfooder quite accurately as a potato that has been cooked in the bbq pit so that it is infused with a lovely smoky flavor.

However...

Echo Valley BBQ has something that they call "pit 'taters", but they're more akin to a Southern version of scalloped potatoes - a luscious mess of sliced potatoes, cream, butter, pork, and bacon. Echo Valley also has something that they call the Meat-Stuffed Spud, which is a huge pit-baked potato stuffed with butter, sour cream, bbq pork, cheese, chives, and bacon. This is dangerous stuff; the kind you can't stop eating even though you know you should.

McClard's, to my knowledge, does not serve pit taters. Their fries are too good to be passed up, though, so it doesn't matter.

If you go to McClard's, go with friends so that you can try a little of everything. You must order a "spread", which I believe is unique to this area. A spread is made by taking a huge plate, covering it with fritos, and then piling tamales, beans, cheese, and onions on top of it all. Do not be put off by the occasional obnoxious customer who pushes past you to get a table. MClard's has a unique seating system that some people abuse.






lleechef
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/19 11:19:01 (permalink)
Bushie,
Thanks so much for your bean-cooking method! On the East Coast (what do we know about beans for heaven's sakes??) they're always baked with so much ketchup, brown sugar, etc. you CANNOT taste the beans. Your way of fixin' them sounds delicious. I just started soaking some and will cook them tomorrow. Again, many thanks!
tamandmik
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/19 12:40:58 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by wanderingjew

Fresh greens were also popular along with gigantic loaded potatos loaded with cheese, onions. butter, sour cream and either bacon or corned beef. Apparently the history of stuffed potato skins began in the Pacific NW.



Wandering Jew,

When I was in Seattle, I remember seeing a cuisine that I will relate, sort of, being from the Northeast, that I have never heard of, called Jo Jo's. They are almost like a cross between thick french fries, and potato skins. Am I right about this? It was about 5 years ago when I was there, so I can't quite remember whether or not there was melted cheese served with them. But, I do remember being able to see them served just about anywhere, including gas stations.
Bushie
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/19 13:04:47 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by lleechef

Bushie,
Thanks so much for your bean-cooking method! On the East Coast (what do we know about beans for heaven's sakes??) they're always baked with so much ketchup, brown sugar, etc. you CANNOT taste the beans. Your way of fixin' them sounds delicious. I just started soaking some and will cook them tomorrow. Again, many thanks!

Let us know how they turn out and what you think!
wanderingjew
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/19 13:28:56 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by tamandmik


Wandering Jew,

When I was in Seattle, I remember seeing a cuisine that I will relate, sort of, being from the Northeast, that I have never heard of, called Jo Jo's. They are almost like a cross between thick french fries, and potato skins. Am I right about this? It was about 5 years ago when I was there, so I can't quite remember whether or not there was melted cheese served with them. But, I do remember being able to see them served just about anywhere, including gas stations.


There is a possibility that Jo Jo's may be generally a West Coast thing, I don't remember specifically relating them to the Pacific NW or Seattle. Of course the Pacific NW is a big potato producing area, so anything potato related you're bound to find in mass quantities. However the big baked loaded spuds seemed to the most popular.
Liketoeat
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/19 14:01:47 (permalink)
Bushie, lleechef surely won't go wrong in following your pinto bean recipe. As you said, you definitely need that salt meat or hamhocks in them and you want them just cooked "good", neither "sludgey" or "watery". I've never cooked them the "Texas way" or even with your jalapenos, but do like a few little pepper pods (not jalapenos; don't know their name; we always just called them hot peppers) in a pot of field peas. You mentioned not having thought of Navy beans in a long time. Well, I'd completely forgotten all the good Lady peas we used to have until just read Mayhaw's mention of them, and somehow now thought of Crowder peas which also had not thought of (or heard of or seen) in years. A good mess of crowders or ladypeas would really be fine, along with the mandatory greens of some sort and cornbread. Interestingly, we never had black beans in these parts until recent years.

Mayhaw, your comment about your wife reminded me that my mother used to say that she was force fed so much liver and spinach before I was born that she could never again stand the taste of either, even though she'd occasionally hold her nose and cook them for the rest of us. Somehow she still loved other greens, but not the spinach. Unlike your son, my growth problem has never been in height, but unfortunatley always with "around the middle"! Somehow, tho, think that may have more to do with my eating than with my mother's.

Alirush, thanks for the additional information re the pit potatoes at Hot Springs barbecues. Have only eaten barbecue there at McClards and one other BBQ spot (can't remember its name) but neither served the pit potatoes, and I've just never seen them anywhere in the state. Am anxious to try them, both varieties. Have had the barbecue stuffed potatoes at a number of barbecue places all around the state. Agree with all your coments re McClards, and it was wise of you to warn any potential customers of their seating system.
Mayhaw Man
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/19 14:20:20 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by Liketoeat
Well, I'd completely forgotten all the good Lady peas we used to have until just read Mayhaw's mention of them, and somehow now thought of Crowder peas which also had not thought of (or heard of or seen) in years. A good mess of crowders or ladypeas would really be fine, along with the mandatory greens of some sort and cornbread. Interestingly, we never had black beans in these parts until recent years.



Liketoeat,
I have been buying peas (shelled in bulk, order ahead, pick em up the next week) and butterbeans at the West Monroe Farmers Market for the last couple of years. That west side of the Ouachita River has got a ton of small truck farms (West Ouachita, Union, Jackson Parishes) that seem to specialize in various pea varieties. They are an incredible bargain price wise and as long as you take your time blanching and freezing, will last until next years crop is available with no noticeable difference in quality.

Zippercreams (highly overrated IMHO, too much starch too little flavor ), lady peas, purple hulls, cowpeas, etc.

They are also a good source for the definitely not overratable Rattlesnake green bean. A relatively new variety that is just delicious.

It is a good farmersmarket of the "not so cute like Fayetteville" variety. Hardscrabble farmers trying to make a living or a little extra cash. You will not find any "boutique cheese" or arugala here. Just good, honest food.
Liketoeat
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/19 15:10:16 (permalink)
Mayhaw, thanks for info re West Monroe farmers' market, though unfortunately I'm seldom through there and if am, am usually headed away from rather than toward home. Surely sounds good though. I like the "for real", "business" farmers markets like that rather than the "cutesy" ones. Will surely take advantage of it if ever have opportunity. You'll have to tell me what "zippercreams" are; that's a pea with which I'm unfamiliar; also Rattlesnake green beans are unknown to me. I'm just familiar with the old pole and bush varieties; Kentucky Wonders primarily. Thanks.
lleechef
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/20 01:29:12 (permalink)
Liketoeat and Mayhaw,
Again, at the risk of sounding like a dumb Yankee chick, I must ask: What are Lady peas, Crowder peas and Zippercreams??? Thanks for the info!
tiki
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/20 06:47:14 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by KimChee43

My husband and I used to go on fishing trips together to Canada b.c. (before child). The menu never varied. Is "Shore Lunch" strictly a Canadian thing?


Nope,its a fishing on big lakes things though and Canada's got LOTS of them.--i've seen this same lunch in Texas,California,Maine,Indiana and i assume lots of other places--and your right the menu never changes!
KokomoJoe
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/20 07:06:40 (permalink)
lleechef: Anadama Bread and "Boston Brown Bread" are two very different "breads"! Actually have had Anadama Bread in Rockport at "Flav's" Great place to eat everyone! They are famous for their Anadama Bread that they serve w/ delicious soups and "chowdahs". You can buy a loaf to take home too! Yum! I've also made Anadama Bread...not difficult. But "Boston Brown Bread" is much more dense and dark and more like a "quick bread" similar to "pumpkin bread, banana bread etc.". Coming in a can isn't as bad as it sounds...really! After all I bake my own pumkin bread in a can...LOL!Been to Rockport (MA) many times but have missed the bakery you referred to! It's not near "Bearskin Neck" is it? Happy eating! KokomoJoe
gala62
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/20 07:29:18 (permalink)
Ahhhh....Rochester, NY hots (no one says hot dogs!) Zweigle's is the ultimate with a natural casing that crunches and pops when you bite into it. And they must be grilled or fried, these are not boiling/steaming hots!

NY Chicken Barbeque. One of my all-time favorites that I miss. Not a tomato based sauce at all. This marinade is made of vinegar, oil, poultry seasoning, an egg and some other ingredients that escape me right now. Marinate chicken in this for a day then grill. Heaven, sheer heaven. The scent will drive you nuts and the crispy bits are worth snatching from your grandma. I've never seen it outside the Finger Lakes area. In fact, I made it for a small wedding in New Jersey and they went nuts over it.

To go with your chicken, you must have salt potatoes. Again, I've never seen them outside the area. Simply take 4 pounds of small, new potatoes and boil them with a full pound of salt until tender. Drain, drizzle a stick of butter over, mash with your fork on the plate, season, and you have the most sublime, creamy, potatoes you've ever tasted!

And when in season, grape pie or kuchen (kind of a coffecake) can't be beat!

Cheers,
Gail
Liketoeat
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/20 09:59:46 (permalink)
lleechef, I'm totally unfamiliar with Zippercreams, and Mayhaw can probably do a better job of explaining lady peas and crowder peas than I can, but here goes with what little I know. Both lady peas and Crowders are field peas (peas which I guess are from the same general family as purple hulls, black eyes, etc. as opposed to English peas). The lady peas are very small cream type peas lighter in color and milder in taste than the Crowders. The Crowders are larger and cook up darker and more full flavored than the lady peas. The most interesting thing about Crowders is that they are the only misshapen peas I can think of; sometimes appearing something kind of like a misshapen, uneven square which leans to one side and with sides kind of beat up. Have heard, but don't know if its so, their name comes for the peas being so crowded in the pod that they take on these strange shapes. Both the lady peas and Crowders are delicious, and I particularly enjoy them for a change, but of all these type peas, the plain old common purple hulls are my favorites with the bladkeyes being my least favorite.
KokomoJoe
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/21 07:06:45 (permalink)
OK all you "Real cornbread lovers"...how about "the recipe"???? I am from NE and I love any kind of "home made" cornbread! I love to stop at "mills" in my travels and get fresh ground corn meal! But I will confess my favorite recipe has plenty of white flour (I always use King Arthur unbleached anyway...)and plenty of sugar! But the problem here is I don't see any of you "real corn bread" people offering up a "real" recipe to us "cake corn bread eaters"! I will make the corn bread if I can just get a decent recipe! Thanks so much...I LOVE this education I'm getting! Happy eating, KokomoJoe
Wistah
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/21 11:03:48 (permalink)
KokomoJoe:

This is about as simple as cornbread gets:

2 C cornmeal
1 C whole wheat pastry flour
1 T baking powder
1 tsp salt
1-1/2 C water and 1/2 C milk

Preheat oven to 375 degrees, and oil a 9" cast iron skillet. Combine all dry ingredients in a mixing bowl. Stir in the wet ingredients and mix well. Pour the batter into the skillet and bake for 25 minutes at 375 degrees.
Lucky Bishop
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/21 13:02:50 (permalink)
I've never gone wrong with this one:

2 cups yellow cornmeal (I often use 1 1/2 cups of stoneground cornmeal and 1/2 cup of grits -- I like the textural difference)
1 cup white flour
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
1 tablespoon baking powder
3/4 teaspoon baking soda
2 eggs
1 cup buttermilk
1/4 cup shortening, oil or lard

Heat oven to 425. Mix dry ingredients together. Beat eggs and add to buttermilk. Heat 10" cast iron skillet over medium heat and add shortening to melt. (Heat the skillet even if you're using oil, it's an important step.) Pour buttermilk-egg mixture into dry ingredients. Add hot melted shortening. Beat quickly until just combined and pour directly into hot skillet. It's going to sizzle, and that's what you want: it'll give the cornbread a lovely dark bottom crust. Bake at 425 for 25 minutes or until done.
tiki
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/21 13:09:42 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by Wistah

KokomoJoe:

This is about as simple as cornbread gets:

2 C cornmeal
1 C whole wheat pastry flour
1 T baking powder
1 tsp salt
1-1/2 C water and 1/2 C milk

Preheat oven to 375 degrees, and oil a 9" cast iron skillet. Combine all dry ingredients in a mixing bowl. Stir in the wet ingredients and mix well. Pour the batter into the skillet and bake for 25 minutes at 375 degrees.


Kokomo Joe,
i use basically the same recipe,but i use buttermilk----and I like the sweet one too,sometimes in desserts--ie instead of shortcake with fresh fruit and whipped cream--beats those cheesy "rounds" freom Hostess,but this one is less crumbly,travels ALOT better,and you can split it and stick a nice peice of county ham in too
wanderingjew
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/21 15:28:12 (permalink)
Today we will talk about Pittsburgh. I lived there from 1996 through almost the end of 2000. To start, the first thing that comes to mind is Pierogis, Pierogis and more Pierogis. Pittsburgh is very heavily Polish, Ukranian and Slovak ( not Slavic)Many taverns and restaurants served Pierogis as appetizers. Other popular items included halupkis (stuffed cabbage or pigs in a blanket as they were also called), Kolbassi,Kluski (noodles and cottage cheese) and Halushki (noodles and cabbage) which my coworkers used to insist was all American and eaten all over the country One restaurant, the Bloomfield Tavern had all these items on one plate called "the Polish Plate" I used to call it the cardiac special.. The famous Primantis sandwich which included french fries and sweet and sour coleslaw right in the sandwich. Kolbassi and cheese was my favorite. Many restaurants had their own variation. Also if you ordered a salad, expect french fries and provolone to be incuded inside the salad. Steak Salad was a very popular dish on most Pittsburgh menus. Chipped chop ham was a very popular item at most delis. Thinly sliced ham usually served on white wonder bread or burger buns. This ham was also made into a bbq ham salad with tangy bbq sauce. City chicken is also a unique item, although I've never had it. Apparently it is not chicken at all, but skewers of veal and pork. Finally each meal can be concluded with either a klondike bar or a clark bar, both of which originated in Pittsburgh.
EliseT
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/21 20:16:28 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by ocdreamr

Ditto on the bean pies here in Baltimore, the nation of Islam guys in their Armani suits sell them on the street corners, never had one either.

Lucky Bishop, sounds like Ranchero beans to me, only I like smoked sausage & ham in there too! I Learned to love the ones at La Fogata in Nuevo Progresso so I have tried to duplicate them at home, not bad if I have to say so myself! Have some in the freezer now, Hmm, might make a good storm meal!


You are missing out! Bean pies are similar to sweet potato or pumpkin pies. I could eat a whole one. And they sometimes have pineapple pies that are pretty spectacular too. I've been trying to learn to make bean pies myself, but they are never the same.
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