Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location

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spadoman
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/26 13:34:12 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by Dipstick

Hey, Spadoman! See you hail from Howard Lake. I grew up in Buffalo. Nothing like good old Wright County road food, eh?


yeah, lust been out here a couple o' months (following the grandkids) Anyway, where is there a good place to eat in wright Cty? Haven't found much yet.
Mayhaw Man
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/26 14:04:18 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by tiki

quote:
Originally posted by peppertree

Anyone ever eat a carnita? I had them at a restaurant in Tijuana (across from the racetrack). The name of the restaurant is U Ru Guapan. I forget the spelling. This is THE roadfood spot in Tijuana. Orange picnic tables, Mariachi music (live) in the evening. A meal there is under $10. Includes Carnitas, pork skin that you can pull right off of the overdone pig and Mexican beer.

Anyone ever eat there?



LOVE Carnita's----when my wife was in grad school in San Diego we went to a restteraunt in Tijuana that specialized in carnitas---you order the meat by the kilo and they supplied all the fixins you could eat along with it" Fabulous stuff and dinner for 4 adults with appeties--with tip--$20---mexico is the only thing about San Diego that i miss!


Since we are on the subject of "South San Diego", when I was living in Tecate I used to eat lunch almost everyday at a place just south of the Ballpark on the road to Ensenada (which coincidentally was on my way to my apt. at Rancho Tecate, a bizarre hotel with a really good restaurant, but that's another story). The place was (and is incidentally, I just checked) is called El Pulpito. They only serve one thing, a dish known in Baja as a "cockatele". This wonderful dining item consists of any of a number of seafoods that are brined seperately, kept chilled and them combined per customer request in a large schooner (you don't have to get large, but why wouldn't you?)and then it is "sauced" with a spicy, thin tomato sauce (more like juice than sauce). You can load them up with shrimp, squid, octopus, oysters, abalone (mmmmmmmm), and a number of other things. This is not ceviche. Similar, yet totally different. I have never seen this dish outside of Northern Baja and really miss it.

El Pulpito on it's own is pretty cool. The kitchen area is squeaky clean. Seating consists of outside tables and chairs with the ubiquitos Tecate umbrellas over the tables. Beverages are purchased next door at "Liquores Tres", an outlet of a well stocked chain of independent (not associated with a brewery) beverage outlets in Tijuana, Rosarita, Ensenada, and Tecate. Service is great and the people there will be happy if your entire Spanish vocabulary consists of pointing, si, and gracias.

While you are in Tecate, pass by "El Mejor Pan" on your way back to the border (across from police station) and pick up some bread. This is probably the best bakery in Northern Baja and certainly one of the best in the San Diego area.

The border crossing at Tecate is two lanes and usually (even at peak times) less than a two minute wait and the drive down through east county San Diego is absolutely gorgeous. If you have room you can stop on your way back at the Dulzura Cafe (in the little oasis of Dulzura) and have a great hamburger and one of the coldest beverages you have ever had in your life


Dipstick
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/26 15:12:21 (permalink)
A couple come immediately to mind. Mill Creek Inn is on the northwest corner of Buffalo Lake. (about a mile from downtown Buffalo on County Road 35 west) Great chicken and burgers. The Juicy Lucy is to die for. Also, just east of you on Highway 12(394) is the Bayrischer Hof in Montrose. Great German food and beer. Check them out at www.bayhof.com.

Good Luck!
wanderingjew
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/10/03 20:12:39 (permalink)
Nothing special. I just thought since the Krispy Kreme thread is back to haunt us again, I thought I would bring my thread back to life. Well, I guess I have to include something regional. Just had a great fish n chips dinner with a few Newport Storms at Wards Publick House in Warwick. It's almost becoming a friday night tradition.
familydok
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/10/05 08:37:39 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by foodmelee

here is some regional cuisine from rural south carolina: pickled pig's feet, fried pork rinds, and chitlings. and the only one of the three of those i like are the pork rinds, especially homemade one's from a local flea market or fair. the pig's feet, i just don't have the heart to partake in, and the chitlings i won't touch. if you don't know what a chitling is, you aint missing anything. basically, it is the stewed guts of a pig, served with rice,typically. rural churches sell plates of it for fundraisers, and the people who like it, really like it alot. i can tell you, it smells horrible cooking, smells just like what it is
This is very similiar to rural Easten NC. Our church has chicken and pastry for fund raising. I notices several folks mentioned liver mush and scrapple-we call it liver pudding. It comes in a loaf for slicing or in stuffed long links. Very similiar just seems to have more liver in it.
Anyone ever seen a hog killing? I can remember as a child going to see folks prepare the differents cuts and then put the hams and shoulders in their smokehouses. Everyone I knew that did this is dead now. Sorry my kids won't see it. Although some do deer now in a similiar way there.
Chef Susan
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/10/06 16:08:13 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by peppertree

Anyone ever eat a carnita? I had them at a restaurant in Tijuana (across from the racetrack). The name of the restaurant is U Ru Guapan. I forget the spelling. This is THE roadfood spot in Tijuana. Orange picnic tables, Mariachi music (live) in the evening. A meal there is under $10. Includes Carnitas, pork skin that you can pull right off of the overdone pig and Mexican beer.

Anyone ever eat there?
" />
Carnitas Uruapan... But of course!!! The BEST place to eat carnitas...and people watch! Where else do you like to eat?
Chef Susan
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/10/06 16:17:59 (permalink)
San Diego: taquitos were supposedly invented by the tortilla factory, El Indio, during the 40's. You can still order 3 taquitos topped with cheese, guacamole, lettuce and salsa for under 3.75. In northern California they appear as an appetizer and you pay over $8 for an order of three. Also, burritos will just have the filling...red chile beef or chicken ranchero and nothing else, or just with refried beans added. North of Los Angeles they add rice to the burritos and serve them with whole pinto beans. I left town before the fish taco rage hit...but have returned home to enjoy them. Also: Point Loma Seafood for smoked fish Louies...fresh fish that has been smoked over iceberg and tomatoes, served with Louie dressing. Can't beat the view!
Poverty Pete
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/10/06 19:11:33 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by Chef Susan

quote:
Originally posted by peppertree

Anyone ever eat a carnita? I had them at a restaurant in Tijuana (across from the racetrack). The name of the restaurant is U Ru Guapan. I forget the spelling. This is THE roadfood spot in Tijuana. Orange picnic tables, Mariachi music (live) in the evening. A meal there is under $10. Includes Carnitas, pork skin that you can pull right off of the overdone pig and Mexican beer.

Anyone ever eat there?
" />
Carnitas Uruapan... But of course!!! The BEST place to eat carnitas...and people watch! Where else do you like to eat?


Carnitas Uruapan also has a restaurant in the southern part of San Diego, in Spring Valley. Mayhaw Man, that seafood cocktail you mention is fairly common in Phoenix and Tucson. Chef Susan, are you familiar with Siesal's Meat Market?
peppertree
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/10/06 20:08:52 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by Chef Susan

quote:
Originally posted by peppertree

Anyone ever eat a carnita? I had them at a restaurant in Tijuana (across from the racetrack). The name of the restaurant is U Ru Guapan. I forget the spelling. This is THE roadfood spot in Tijuana. Orange picnic tables, Mariachi music (live) in the evening. A meal there is under $10. Includes Carnitas, pork skin that you can pull right off of the overdone pig and Mexican beer.

Anyone ever eat there?
" />
Carnitas Uruapan... But of course!!! The BEST place to eat carnitas...and people watch! Where else do you like to eat?


About a month before leaving for a long vacation that included Tijuana, I saw a write up in the NY Times about them. I took the article with me and showed it to the management of the restaurant. In exchange for the article which they did not know of, they treated me to a carnitas meal and two bottles of beer all on the house.

I had a good time there.
Chef Susan
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/10/07 00:00:09 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by Poverty Pete

quote:
Originally posted by Chef Susan

quote:
Originally posted by peppertree

Anyone ever eat a carnita? I had them at a restaurant in Tijuana (across from the racetrack). The name of the restaurant is U Ru Guapan. I forget the spelling. This is THE roadfood spot in Tijuana. Orange picnic tables, Mariachi music (live) in the evening. A meal there is under $10. Includes Carnitas, pork skin that you can pull right off of the overdone pig and Mexican beer.
Hi Poverty Pete

I no longer live in San Diego but my father still buys his meat at Siesel's. We used to buy our meat at the Fort Stockton market but it has since closed.

Anyone ever eat there?
" />
Carnitas Uruapan... But of course!!! The BEST place to eat carnitas...and people watch! Where else do you like to eat?


Carnitas Uruapan also has a restaurant in the southern part of San Diego, in Spring Valley. Mayhaw Man, that seafood cocktail you mention is fairly common in Phoenix and Tucson. Chef Susan, are you familiar with Siesal's Meat Market?
Ort. Carlton.
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/10/07 22:02:00 (permalink)
Dearfolk,
When mentioning North Dakota cuisine, you left out one thing: sunflower pie. There's a cafe in Atlanta that has it every once in awhile: the lady got the idea off either the net or one of the food channels. I wonder, though - does she remember to serve it with the point of the pie slice facing east?
A friend who is of pure Norsk extraction mentions that if lutefisk doesn't resemble putty, then it wasn't made right. And the bread (lefse) is supposed to crumble as you watch it.
Sounds delectible. Maybe next Summer I can make that trek to Grand Forks to get some chocolate-covered potato chips and take in the rest of what all y'all mentioned. Or about this time of year - that might be better. Oktober's lutefisk time.
Livermushingly, Ort. Carlton in Athens, Georgia, Which Is Only Known For Me (Tee-Hee).
canoodle
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/10/08 22:54:54 (permalink)
Lefse...crumble?!?! It's a potato based flat bread that is thin and pliable..like a tortilla. I have some in my freezer. My husband likes his buttered with cinnamon and sugar. Some also roll the lefse around butter and pickles. Hostfest is in full swing here in Minot. Tens of thousands of visitors eating (white) lefse,(white)lutefisk,(white) klub,(white) rommegrot and (white) tasteless pastries. Blech!
b-n-kchefservice
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/10/09 02:07:10 (permalink)
Hey there wanderingjew I am from MI so I know all about pasties they are allover the U.P. here. Also I have had all of the things you are writing about here because I was on a crew that did the coure remodeling job at the allentown munniciple golf course back in 97. all were pretty good. but the thing I miss the most is the yuingling lager that you cant get anywhere but PA from what I understand. So if brew is your thing have one for me.
quote:
Originally posted by brookquarry

living at the northeast edge of Pennsylvanias lehigh valley we have an interesting overlap of regional cuisines. We are still(barely) part of the pennsylvania dutch country and thus such delicacies as shoe fly pie and chow chow are commonly available, at local restaurants along with (less commonly) such dutch dishes as pigs stomach and red beet eggs. (By the way ruby rose you havn't lived until you've tried browned butter on egg noodles). We are also part of the pierogie belt and virtually every diner serves them as a side dish(Usually Mrs. T'S frozen perogies unfortunately) .But the one dish unique to our little area is pasties. Introduced by cornish slate quariers who would take them down into the quarry holes as lunch pastys have become the signature cuisine of our area known popularly as the Slate Belt They are on the menu in every diner in the area, are a frequent church fund raiser,and there are even two local retail outlets- Maries pasties- a store front bakery and MR. Pastie which sells fresh pasties locally, and frozen pasties to supermarkets.
Spodeeodee
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/10/18 23:44:13 (permalink)
Here in Savannah, low country boil. Essentially just sausage, shrimp, corn (still on the cob), potatoes, and okra (ingredients vary) boiled up with some old bay (seasonings vary too..). The fun part is that you dump it all onto a table covered in newspaper and go to it! I don't know if it's unique to this area, but they steam oysters over a fire on a steel plate. Cover them with the burlap bag they came in (you need at LEAST 100 lbs, right?) and soak them down with a hose...let them steam for about eight minutes and shovel them onto a table (not the same one as the low country boil though).
It's not food, but Chatham artillery punch is a local thing here. Closer to artillery than punch!

Ingredients
- 1 1/2 gallons catawba wine
- 1/2 gallon rum
- 1 quart gin
- 1 quart brandy
- 1/2 pint Benedictine
- 2 quarts Maraschino cherries
- 1 1/2 quarts rye whiskey
- 1 1/2 gallons strong tea
- 2 1/2 pounds brown sugar
- 1 1/2 quarts orange juice
- 1 1/2 quarts lemon juice

Mix from 36 to 48 hours before serving. Add one case of champagne when ready to serve.
tiki
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/10/19 07:42:34 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by Spodeeodee

Here in Savannah, low country boil. Essentially just sausage, shrimp, corn (still on the cob), potatoes, and okra (ingredients vary) boiled up with some old bay (seasonings vary too..). The fun part is that you dump it all onto a table covered in newspaper and go to it! I don't know if it's unique to this area, but they steam oysters over a fire on a steel plate. Cover them with the burlap bag they came in (you need at LEAST 100 lbs, right?) and soak them down with a hose...let them steam for about eight minutes and shovel them onto a table (not the same one as the low country boil though).
It's not food, but Chatham artillery punch is a local thing here. Closer to artillery than punch!

Ingredients
- 1 1/2 gallons catawba wine
- 1/2 gallon rum
- 1 quart gin
- 1 quart brandy
- 1/2 pint Benedictine
- 2 quarts Maraschino cherries
- 1 1/2 quarts rye whiskey
- 1 1/2 gallons strong tea
- 2 1/2 pounds brown sugar
- 1 1/2 quarts orange juice
- 1 1/2 quarts lemon juice

Mix from 36 to 48 hours before serving. Add one case of champagne when ready to serve.



Spodeeodee,

having about 20 folks over for New Years,think one batch of artillary punch is enough or should i make 2?
KimChee43
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/10/19 08:34:15 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by wanderingjew

quote:
Originally posted by KimChee43

[quote
WANDERINGJEW: I found your Rhode Island post very informative, and I'm wondering if you can help me out. We'll be taking a trip to New England soon with 2 senior citizen ladies in tow. We'll be landing at the Providence airport right around lunchtime. We'll all be hungry. Can you recommend a nice sit-down restaurant not too far from the airport where we can get a bite to eat? It would be great to try some regional specialties. Many thanks.


About 2 1/2 miles from the airport on a side street off Post Road (rt 1) is the Crows Nest Restaurant. It's a little tricky to get there because you have to go through a Rotary. They have fantastic stuffed shrimp, a better than average lobster roll and is very popular with "the gray haired set". Their website is www.eatatcrowsnest.com



WANDERINGJEW: We ate at the Crow's Nest over Columbus Day weekend. We enjoyed the food--the stuffed shrimp were great. You're right--it IS popular with the "grey haired" set. I think I was the youngest adult there, and I'm in my 40s!! Had some trouble finding the place, but it was an adventure. Thanks for the recommendation.

KimChee43
Spodeeodee
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/10/19 11:25:24 (permalink)
Tiki, are your friends from Savannah? If so, you might want to make two batches just in case.
Spodeeodee
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/10/19 12:16:51 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by EliseT

I feel like I must represent, but most of our food in California can be traced back to another place. Offhand I can think of Cobb salad, SF Sourdough bread, date shakes, and Santa Maria style BBQ. We seem to do movements rather than specialties. We have Cal-mex and "California fusion", and the fad of eating fresh and in season started in California. Can any of my fellow left-coasters think of others?

California common, also known as "steam" beer. The most popular example is anchor steam.

I can't believe I didn't see anyone from the Seattle area mention gooeyducks!!
flowercat
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/10/19 16:06:57 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by wanderingjew

quote:
Originally posted by hilldweller

quote:
Originally posted by wanderingjew

I grew up on Long Island in a town with a large Jewish population and a decent sized italian population.


Did you grow up in Matzohpizza?


No, Merrick.


Me too!
AmeriKenArtist
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/10/19 16:43:27 (permalink)
My Father-In-Law loved to make pasties. He was born and raised in Cornwall England. It was the ONE time he would "take over" the kitchen!
Spodeeodee
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/10/19 20:31:53 (permalink)
I was at my friends sunday bbq today, and someone came with a bag of the local food that I can't believe I forgot about. Hot boiled peanuts!!
wanderingjew
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/10/20 12:13:53 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by KimChee43

Originally posted by wanderingjew

Originally posted by KimChee43

WANDERINGJEW: We ate at the Crow's Nest over Columbus Day weekend. We enjoyed the food--the stuffed shrimp were great. You're right--it IS popular with the 'grey haired' set. I think I was the youngest adult there, and I'm in my 40s!! Had some trouble finding the place, but it was an adventure. Thanks for the recommendation.

KimChee43


Glad to be of assistance!
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/10/20 17:27:47 (permalink)
Tiki: As a scuba diver from California just thought you might like to try chicken breasts cut into 3 pieces pounded very flat. Marinate in bottled clam juice with lots of fresh garlic cut into big pieces (1 whole head). Marinate more than 24 hours. Drain and dip in crushed chicken in the basket cracker crumbs and saute in butter in a shallow pan until browned. Sprinkle with sea salt and a squeeze of lemon. Scrumptous and the smell brings hungry eaters from far and wide. Close to scalone without having to have abalone and/or scallops.
tiki
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/10/20 21:55:30 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by RedPatti

Tiki: As a scuba diver from California just thought you might like to try chicken breasts cut into 3 pieces pounded very flat. Marinate in bottled clam juice with lots of fresh garlic cut into big pieces (1 whole head). Marinate more than 24 hours. Drain and dip in crushed chicken in the basket cracker crumbs and saute in butter in a shallow pan until browned. Sprinkle with sea salt and a squeeze of lemon. Scrumptous and the smell brings hungry eaters from far and wide. Close to scalone without having to have abalone and/or scallops.


Chicken of the sea!!!
Sounds like its worth a try to me---especially since ive got a snowballs chance in hell of getting abalone bits out here in Oklahoma! Thanks for the idea/recipe!
Hillbilly
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/10/21 10:55:57 (permalink)
from familydoc
Anyone ever seen a hog killing? I can remember as a child going to see folks prepare the differents cuts and then put the hams and shoulders in their smokehouses. Everyone I knew that did this is dead now. Sorry my kids won't see it. Although some do deer now in a similiar way there.


One of my most unpleasant memories. We always took care of that in late November (usually 2 hogs). We (in the North Carolina mountains)had to wait until it was cold enough that the hams and shoulders would cure without spoiling. This brings back very vivid mind pictures of vats of boiling water, heavy duty hoists on a very large tree limb, taking part in the actual slaughter and butchering, grinding strips into sausage, rubbing the salt/pepper/brown sugar mixture into the hams and shoulders before hanging them to cure, and the feel and smell of grease on everything I touched for days. But the taste of fresh tenderloin and then the country ham when it finished curing made it all worthwhile.
Liketoeat
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/10/21 20:57:11 (permalink)
The second quote in hillbilly's post above surely brings back many memories, and is a pretty accurate picture as I recall hog killings, tho we killed, according to the weather, anywhere from November to February, and usually killed 4 hogs. It was messy work but was worth it. Only things I recall which don't see mentioned above are the cooking of the lard and some other folks back in the far corner of the lot, as far from everything and everyone else as possible, cleaning chittlings for themselves. After all the work of the day, then that grinding sausage that night (with big hand powered sausage grinders) was even more work. Particularly surprised to see mention of the fresh tenderloin, for not too many folks other than us around here savored it, but to us that indeed made it all worthwhile, as did the fresh sausage (which I liked much better than the cured sausage). Somehow the hog killings always were always more of an "event", just had more "romance, adventure" to them than did the beef kilings which were always just straight forward work/business matters. PS - typo corrections.
tiki
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/10/21 21:31:07 (permalink)
Much the same inmy Italian grandparents home in New England as you guys in the southland--altough we made italian sausage and homemade procuitto instead of country ham---i rmember this big marble block contraption that we would pack tham--and peppercorns into ande then a heavy marble block went on top to press it flat as it dry cured. It WAS greasy and hard work for a kid---and we HAD to help---"Eh,you gunna eat it ,you gunna help!"--but there is NOTHING like the taste of homemade procuitto!! We had a typical large italian extended family and my grandparents were the Head of the family--it was on their land that all the gerden crops were grown---seem like aaaaaaaaacres of tomatos to me as a kid but was proably about 100 plants and also his "farm" supplied the pigs for the whole family-so there was often 10-12 pigs being done at a time and 9it was commen for there to be 40 to 75 folks ther for the weekend with all going home with boxes of food for the freezer or canned what ever---one of my favorite time was when the squab was ready---lots of family members raised them and when it was time to harvest them--(right before they fly but are at full size)we would clean them and roast them over coals in the yard and then pack them in barrels with lard to cover them and keep them in the cellar. The later in the year when my grandmother would make "little birds and polenta" we kids would be sent down stairs with a huge pan to fill with the birds which would be heated up--drained of the lard and mixed with sauce to simmer--when the polenta was ready my grandmother would turn it out right oon the large metal table in the kitchen and then stick the squab on skewers into it as it cooled and we would all slice a hunk for our plate and cover with sauce. God i miss that!!!! Any way---thanks for reminding me of hog butchering time!! It brought back wonderful memories!
TANFANRN
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/10/22 03:16:23 (permalink)
IN MICHIGAN, VERNORS GINGER ALE, BETTER MADE POTATO CHIPS, CONEY DOGS, AND SANDERS HOT FUDGE SUNDAES. ALSO MANY MIDDLE EASTERN RESTAURANTS SERVING THINGS LIKE HUMMUS, BABA GANOUJSH(SP), CHICHEN SHAWARMAS, FATOUSH, AND KEBABS GALORE. IN THE U.P. IT'S PASTIES AND SMOKED WHITEFISH.
wanderingjew
Sirloin
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/11/21 08:12:28 (permalink)
I've been reviewing some of the topics on this board and just thought it was necessary to bring back this one.

I'm going to be heading to Williamsburg VA for a few days before thanksgiving. I plan on going to Pierce's Pit BBQ for lunch this coming tuesday. I reviewed there web site and noticed that they have sweet potato sticks on their menu. Although I've had them before in other states, I heard they were invented in Virginia. Is that true
The-Porcus
Junior Burger
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/11/22 19:11:43 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by M&M

quote:
Originally posted by Sundancer7

In Nova Scotia gravy is routinely served with French Fries.

Paul E. Smith
Knoxville, TN


With cheese curds on top. Called poteen if I'm not mistaken.


That's what it's called but it's spelled poutine and is not to be confused for the traditional Acadien dis, poutine rapee which resembles nothing else I've (unless you have ever rolled leftover soggy scalloped potatoes into a ball and fried them in lard.
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