Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location

Page: << < ..6789 > Showing page 7 of 9
Post
ImtheMom
Junior Burger
RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2005/01/07 18:02:27
quote:
Originally posted by QFan

quote:
Originally posted by CarolinaBill

A Pittsburgh "delicacy" is something called chipped ham. It is actually very similar to a product found in most parts of country called "chopped ham" that is somewhat like a semi-congealed loaf of pork/ham product. But what makes it "chipped ham" in Pittsburgh style is that it is sliced so thin that it is practically transparent, then stacked liberally on white bread, preferably with good old Heinz ketchup. Yum!

Pittsburgh is also known to "Parmesan"-ize ANYTHING. Shrimp, fish, pork chops, you name it, we'll put spaghetti sauce and cheese on it. And spaghetti is ALWAYS an option in Pittsburgh as your side dish in lieu of a potato or other side.

Speaking of Pittsburgh, when one of my kids was living in that area several yrs ago I discovered that people in the southwestern PA area seem to prefer using mustard on their french fries over ketchup. Only place where I've run into that particular regional preference. Just curious if it's done in any other part of the country?
QFan
Bonita Springs, FL


Pittsburgh is my beloved hometown, although I don't live there right now. Mustard on french fries is NOT a regional preference there. Perhaps you visited a single restaurant that served french fries with mustard, giving you the impression that it was common. For example, I recall that the fast food place "The Potato Patch" at Kennywood and Sandcastle offers lots of different toppings for french fries such as cheese, gravy or mustard, but I think that's just to provide variety and funky uniqueness. Most people in Pittsburgh put good ol' Heinz Ketchup on their french fries.
QFan
Double Cheeseburger
RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2005/01/07 19:36:29
quote:
Originally posted by ImtheMom

quote:
Originally posted by QFan

quote:
Originally posted by CarolinaBill

A Pittsburgh "delicacy" is something called chipped ham. It is actually very similar to a product found in most parts of country called "chopped ham" that is somewhat like a semi-congealed loaf of pork/ham product. But what makes it "chipped ham" in Pittsburgh style is that it is sliced so thin that it is practically transparent, then stacked liberally on white bread, preferably with good old Heinz ketchup. Yum!

Pittsburgh is also known to "Parmesan"-ize ANYTHING. Shrimp, fish, pork chops, you name it, we'll put spaghetti sauce and cheese on it. And spaghetti is ALWAYS an option in Pittsburgh as your side dish in lieu of a potato or other side.

Speaking of Pittsburgh, when one of my kids was living in that area several yrs ago I discovered that people in the southwestern PA area seem to prefer using mustard on their french fries over ketchup. Only place where I've run into that particular regional preference. Just curious if it's done in any other part of the country?
QFan
Bonita Springs, FL


Pittsburgh is my beloved hometown, although I don't live there right now. Mustard on french fries is NOT a regional preference there. Perhaps you visited a single restaurant that served french fries with mustard, giving you the impression that it was common. For example, I recall that the fast food place "The Potato Patch" at Kennywood and Sandcastle offers lots of different toppings for french fries such as cheese, gravy or mustard, but I think that's just to provide variety and funky uniqueness. Most people in Pittsburgh put good ol' Heinz Ketchup on their french fries.


Thanks for clearing that up ImtheMom!
QFan
Bonita Springs, FL
harriet1954
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2005/01/08 10:59:36
quote:
Originally posted by stricken_detective

quote:
Originally posted by wanderingjew

Actually, I might as well put this thread to good use. Does anyone know the origin of red beer? That's beer with tomato juice. I hear it's popular in either in the Midwest or Out West. But not sure exactly where?


Not here in the Midwest. This is what's "red beer" here:

http://www.leinie.com/red.htm


I'm familiar with Leinenkugel, as my boyfriend-before-Bill was from Cadott, WI (and was buried there last year as result of a fatal brain tumor), and brought me a Leinie shirt which I really do cherish! He also brought back cans of Leinie (couldn't bring bottles) along with cheese curds and he shared the beer at a summertime party one year.

My father and grandfather both owned bars in Philadelphia and Lower Bucks County, PA, and ordering beer with tomato juice in it was common. After I moved to Jersey, I started frequenting my dear old hangout, the Greentop. There was an old man whose name I forget now, and he always ordered pitchers of red beer. I asked him if I could taste it once, and he graciously poured me 12 oz. of it. I thought it tasted really good! I don't remember what kind of beer it was.
LegalLady
Cheeseburger
RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2005/01/08 11:14:56
"Red Beer" is a big thing here in Nebraska, personally I don't like beer, but tomato juice or Snappy Tom might make it taste better!

The Lady
cheesehead
Junior Burger
RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2005/01/18 13:23:34
quote:
Originally posted by tiki

<blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<div style="border: 1px #999999 solid; background-color: #DCDCDC; padding: 4px;">Originally posted by Lone Star

How are the pepper and egg sandwiches made?


quote:
My grandmother taught me-----we use roasted red or green peppers that we kept packed in olive oil---now you can buy them anywhere it seems---put some of them-in good sized "chunks"-along with some olive oil and a little crushed red pepper flakes in a fry pan on med heat and saute till the are warm and then swirl in eggs that have been beaten with a touch of water--seems to make them fluffier--and cook as srambled eggs--i usually make them a little firmer than i do normal scrambled eggs, ass they keep in the lunchbox without sogging the bread---i usually butter the bread to keep the mayo from sogging it--unless im eating them right away--white bread btw or Scala if you can get it. Hit them with a touch of good mayo--im partial to Hellmans/BestFoods-a little salt and pepper and-------MMMMMMM My granfather actually liked to toss in a few capers and i do so on occasion,but i think they are best if kept simple ----eggs and roasted peppers compliment each other really well. This started out in our home as a friday lunch---remember when it was a sin for catholics to eat meat on Fridays---God must have changed his mind!-but where to good to only eat once a week, so try em--you'll like em!!



Tiki, I've been eating these since I was a kid, here in Southern Wisconsin. We called them a fried egg sandwich. (I'm not being a smart ---). We had them, because, as a kid, eggs were cheap. Various vegies would be added, but green and/or red peppers HAD to be included. I like it with Miracle Whip, my wife likes it with Helms.
cindyloo
Cheeseburger
RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2005/01/18 14:11:16
quote:
Originally posted by wanderingjew

Actually, I might as well put this thread to good use. Does anyone know the origin of red beer? That's beer with tomato juice. I hear it's popular in either in the Midwest or Out West. But not sure exactly where?


I don't know the origin, but I have a couple of brothers-in-law here in Iowa who drink red beer -- they actually call it bloody beer.

Cindy
kland01s
Filet Mignon
RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2005/01/18 14:26:01
A million years ago when I was in college in Iowa, a friend talked a couple of us in to drivng to North Dakota with him to go home and help his family during wheat harvest. I remember that they would be out all night on the combines and then come in about 9am to groaning tables of food and beer mixed with tomato juice.
SouthHillbilly
Cheeseburger
RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2005/01/18 18:11:50
In Southern WV it's beans and corn bread. . .
Pinto beans cooked for hours with a big ol chunk of hambone, pork or fatback thrown in. The cornbread has to be sweet.
Fill a bowl with beans, salt well, crumble the cornbread on top and mix it in, then sprinkle fresh chopped and crunchy raw onions on top.
Folks make it all different consistencies. It might be like soup or like pudding. Every restaurant featuring country cooking has "beans and cornbread."
Ya take ta likin it on about the second or third encounter.
wanderingjew
Sirloin
RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2005/01/18 18:50:45
quote:
Originally posted by SouthHillbilly

In Southern WV it's beans and corn bread. . .
Pinto beans cooked for hours with a big ol chunk of hambone, pork or fatback thrown in. The cornbread has to be sweet.
Fill a bowl with beans, salt well, crumble the cornbread on top and mix it in, then sprinkle fresh chopped and crunchy raw onions on top.
Folks make it all different consistencies. It might be like soup or like pudding. Every restaurant featuring country cooking has "beans and cornbread."
Ya take ta likin it on about the second or third encounter.


SouthHillbilly,

I found exactly what you're describing on one of my previous trips to the Arkansas Ozarks. I always thought it was an Arkansas thing. I've been to West Virginia (Charleston, Morgantown and Bluefield) but don't recall seeing it on menus there.
cheesehead
Junior Burger
RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2005/01/18 22:15:37
quote:
Originally posted by rbpalmer

<blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<div style="border: 1px #999999 solid; background-color: #DCDCDC; padding: 4px;">Originally posted by MikeSh

<blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<div style="border: 1px #999999 solid; background-color: #DCDCDC; padding: 4px;">Originally posted by Lone Star

Bushie - you did not mention Pecos cantelopes, our beautiful, sweet fruits from the arid Pecos Valley. There is something about the soil there that makes them the best in the world.

Sorry LoneStar, gotta disagree. THE Best cantalopes come from the central San Jauquin valley of Calif. Especially around Firebaugh and Mendota. There just isn't a better melon then one of these picked ripe and fresh from the field, served chilled.

Boy how I miss the produce from Fresno.


Never having knowingly had any cantaloupe from the area you mention, I can't make any valid comparison. However, I can't imagine any cantaloupe being significantly better than the Eastern Shore (of Maryland) 'loupes that I have purchased from roadside stands in that area. As you suggest, I think the key is the amount of time the melons spend in transit from the field to the consumer, and the extent to which they are allowed to ripen on the vine.


I don't know why, but vegetables that have been irragated, rather than rained on seemed to lose something in the flavor. I have lived in California (Yes, I've had the cantalopes, and the sweet corn, etc from the valley.) and currently live in Wisconsin. The catalopes back here are much larger and sweeter than any I had in Cal.
cheesehead
Junior Burger
RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2005/01/18 22:45:41
quote:
Originally posted by chicagostyledog

Racine, Wisconsin is famous for SC Johnson and kringles. Kringles are a large delicious butter-layered flaky pastry filled with fruit or nuts and drizzled with a sweet white frosting. Racine Danish kringles are baked daily at the following: O&H Danish Bakery(2 stores), Lehmann's, Larson's and Bendtsen's. Visit www.ohdanishbakery.com to order their products. Racine is also famous for Horlich, the company that made malt powder and tablets. Door County, Wisconsin is known for fish boils. Friday night fish frys are popular throught the state. Milwaukee is known for it's creamy custard at Kopp's and Leon's and fine encased meats from the Usinger Sausage Company. Culver's, a Wisconsin based chain has brought custard and butterburgers into the national limelight, while Sheboygan has been famous for it's brats.


Back in the '50's and '60's, most of the fish fries were all you could eat, and were served with either french fries or potato pancakes. Nowadays, the all you can eat fish fries have become somewhat scarce. Fish boils can be found all along the shore-line of the lakes, during the summer. Usinger sausage is to die for as are the Kringles.
cheesehead
Junior Burger
RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2005/01/18 23:26:46
quote:
Originally posted by wanderingjew

Actually, I might as well put this thread to good use. Does anyone know the origin of red beer? That's beer with tomato juice. I hear it's popular in either in the Midwest or Out West. But not sure exactly where?


Here in Wisconsin, this is called a bloody susan.
SouthHillbilly
Cheeseburger
RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2005/01/19 01:56:05
quote:
Originally posted by wanderingjew

quote:
Originally posted by SouthHillbilly

In Southern WV it's beans and corn bread. . .
Pinto beans cooked for hours with a big ol chunk of hambone, pork or fatback thrown in. The cornbread has to be sweet.
Fill a bowl with beans, salt well, crumble the cornbread on top and mix it in, then sprinkle fresh chopped and crunchy raw onions on top.
Folks make it all different consistencies. It might be like soup or like pudding. Every restaurant featuring country cooking has "beans and cornbread."
Ya take ta likin it on about the second or third encounter.


SouthHillbilly,

I found exactly what you're describing on one of my previous trips to the Arkansas Ozarks. I always thought it was an Arkansas thing. I've been to West Virginia (Charleston, Morgantown and Bluefield) but don't recall seeing it on menus there.


WanderingJ, you might not find it in Morgantown, but certainly in Charleston and probably Bluefield. It's a very pedestrian dish, so you'd only get it in real country kitchen places. The Corner Rest. on Charleston's west side, The Farm Table in So. Charleston, definitely Southern Kitchen in Kanawha City (reviewed by the Sterns) . . .probably not at any of the downtown places. . . they try to be oh so upscale.
mayor al
Fire Safety Admin
RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2005/01/19 08:43:26
Eastern Kentucky delivers the "Beans" also. Pintos, or Whites prepared as they do in W V or Arkansas. Several of the small town restaurants that I have sampled serve them on a dinner plate, rather than in a bowl. You'll find the bits of meat mixed in gets a higher percentage than in some 'Bean Soup' receipes.
I wonder if we could actually draw a line on the map that displayed the separation between the places that serve Beans like this as "Beans"-the entree (even if they don't use the descriptor words) and those places that refer to the same sort of thing as "Bean Soup"- the appetizer???
A lesson in linguistics !
sugarlander
Cheeseburger
RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2005/01/19 10:12:24
In New Orleans and some other areas of South Louisiana, red beans and rice are common, and supposed to be a Monday--clean out the excesses of the weekend--meal.
In the Morgan City area, it's white beans and rice instead. In both of these areas the beans are layered on the rice, often cooked or served with andouille.
In the Caribbean, the beans and rice seem to be mixed together.
SouthHillbilly
Cheeseburger
RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2005/01/19 11:17:12
quote:
Originally posted by Al-The Mayor-Bowen

Eastern Kentucky delivers the "Beans" also. Pintos, or Whites prepared as they do in W V or Arkansas. Several of the small town restaurants that I have sampled serve them on a dinner plate, rather than in a bowl. You'll find the bits of meat mixed in gets a higher percentage than in some 'Bean Soup' receipes.
I wonder if we could actually draw a line on the map that displayed the separation between the places that serve Beans like this as "Beans"-the entree (even if they don't use the descriptor words) and those places that refer to the same sort of thing as "Bean Soup"- the appetizer???
A lesson in linguistics !


Al, I suspect you could get any number of good hillbilly cooks to argue with you over "bean soup vs. beans". . . but I'm new here so I aint gonna do it!
tiki
Filet Mignon
RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2005/01/19 11:28:04
quote:
Originally posted by SouthHillbilly

quote:
Originally posted by Al-The Mayor-Bowen

Eastern Kentucky delivers the "Beans" also. Pintos, or Whites prepared as they do in W V or Arkansas. Several of the small town restaurants that I have sampled serve them on a dinner plate, rather than in a bowl. You'll find the bits of meat mixed in gets a higher percentage than in some 'Bean Soup' receipes.
I wonder if we could actually draw a line on the map that displayed the separation between the places that serve Beans like this as "Beans"-the entree (even if they don't use the descriptor words) and those places that refer to the same sort of thing as "Bean Soup"- the appetizer???
A lesson in linguistics !---just ask any of the resident BajaOklahomans---oops--i mean Texans!


Al, I suspect you could get any number of good hillbilly cooks to argue with you over "bean soup vs. beans". . . but I'm new here so I aint gonna do it!


Have no fear SOuthhillbilly---argueing over "beans" is a long standing tradition around here!!
Michael Hoffman
Double-chop Porterhouse
RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2005/01/19 12:29:41
Hey, SouthHillbilly, do you by any chance live in South Hills?
essvee
Cheeseburger
RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2005/01/19 15:26:52
tiki, that story about the little birds and polenta made me cry. Did the preserving in lard soften up the bones and make them edible? How long did the birds simmer? Was the sauce tomato? Did you save and reuse the bird lard? What for?

Oh Og, it must have tasted wonderful. I loved this thread; I hope it goes on forever. Alas, growing up on the shore of CT, I have nothing to add.
crcoll
Junior Burger
RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2005/01/19 17:17:16
Philadelphia Area - Taylor Pork Roll - Tangy

I had a distant relative that owned a "Taylor Pork Roll Shop" on the Ocean City, NJ boardwalk and my parents would take us there once a summer to see Gus and sample the pork roll.

Great the following ways:

1) On a potato roll with melted American or Provolone cheese and ketchup
2)On a bagel (I like plain or onion) halved - each half lathered with Philadelphia cream cheese and then a single piece or two or tangy pork roll on each half (open faced).
3) On a Thomas English Muffin, again as with the bagel halved. Each bagel half is buttered and then a single piece of tangy pork roll with melted American Cheese on it.

I double my Lipitor on the days that I eat one of these!!
SouthHillbilly
Cheeseburger
RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2005/01/20 00:11:20
quote:
Originally posted by Michael Hoffman

Hey, SouthHillbilly, do you by any chance live in South Hills?


For now. Are you familiar with the area?!
RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2005/02/16 21:13:35
quote:
Originally posted by brookquarry

living at the northeast edge of Pennsylvanias lehigh valley ... the one dish unique to our little area is pasties. Introduced by cornish slate quariers who would take them down into the quarry holes as lunch pastys have become the signature cuisine of our area known popularly as the Slate Belt They are on the menu in every diner in the area, are a frequent church fund raiser,and there are even two local retail outlets- Maries pasties- a store front bakery and MR. Pastie which sells fresh pasties locally, and frozen pasties to supermarkets.


I used to be able to find Mr. Pastie(s) at Giant Food in Wheaton MD,
and they were delicious. I'll be in Bucks County PA this summer for a wedding but I won't have time to shop around or even visit South Street for a cheese steak. But if anyone finds them in a store that's close, I will definitely make a side trip. Who cares about the rehearsal dinner anyway?

The Scarlet Pumpernickel
brookquarry
Cheeseburger
RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2005/02/17 08:49:31
quote:
Originally posted by The Scarlet Pumpernickel

quote:
Originally posted by brookquarry

living at the northeast edge of Pennsylvanias lehigh valley ... the one dish unique to our little area is pasties. Introduced by cornish slate quariers who would take them down into the quarry holes as lunch pastys have become the signature cuisine of our area known popularly as the Slate Belt They are on the menu in every diner in the area, are a frequent church fund raiser,and there are even two local retail outlets- Maries pasties- a store front bakery and MR. Pastie which sells fresh pasties locally, and frozen pasties to supermarkets.

Your best bet is probably to either email mr. pastie (MrPastie@ee.net) or call them at (6100 863-9091) and find out which Bucks County Supermarkets carry their product.

I used to be able to find Mr. Pastie(s) at Giant Food in Wheaton MD,
and they were delicious. I'll be in Bucks County PA this summer for a wedding but I won't have time to shop around or even visit South Street for a cheese steak. But if anyone finds them in a store that's close, I will definitely make a side trip. Who cares about the rehearsal dinner anyway?

The Scarlet Pumpernickel
Ace Holleran
Junior Burger
RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2005/02/18 04:18:16
Too many favorites:

Al's Italian Beef in ChiTown (order one "hot and wet")
Fried ravioli in St. Loo.
A porterhouse at Peter Luger's, Brooklyn
A Fatburger in El Lay.
Skyline Chili, anywhere near Cincy.
Nick and Vito's pizza, Chicago.
Modern Apizza, New Haven
Pizza at any one of 1,582 different places in CT.
Abbot's Lobster in the Rough, CT
No Name fish house in Beantown.
Goldeye salmon at Hy's Steakhouse, Winnipeg.
Super Duper Weenie in Fairfield, CT, which will spoil you on franks for a lifetime.
Fries at any Papaya Hut, NYC
Arthur Bryant's barbecue, Kansas City
Tuna on the grill at Kemo's in Lahaina, Maui, HI
Sushi at Sakura, Westport, CT
Pasta D'Oro at Capriccio's, NYC
Linguine with white clam sauce at DeRosa's, Wesport, CT
Anything at La Luna, Little Italy, NYC
An omelet at Jackson Hole, NYC
Guacamole (prepared tableside) at Hampton Gardens, Westwood, CA
Cobb salad at Musso and Frank, Hollywood

And finally, a Maker's Mark Manhattan at the Ritz in Boston.

I'll stop here.






EliseT
Filet Mignon
RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2005/02/20 08:21:26
quote:
Originally posted by sugarlander

In New Orleans and some other areas of South Louisiana, red beans and rice are common, and supposed to be a Monday--clean out the excesses of the weekend--meal.
In the Morgan City area, it's white beans and rice instead. In both of these areas the beans are layered on the rice, often cooked or served with andouille.
In the Caribbean, the beans and rice seem to be mixed together.


I heard that red beans and rice are cooked on Monday, because that is wash day, and the pot can simmer unattended while the wash is done. Charming, if not true...
tiki
Filet Mignon
RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2005/02/20 10:01:58
quote:
Originally posted by essvee

tiki, that story about the little birds and polenta made me cry. Did the preserving in lard soften up the bones and make them edible? How long did the birds simmer? Was the sauce tomato? Did you save and reuse the bird lard? What for?

Oh Og, it must have tasted wonderful. I loved this thread; I hope it goes on forever. Alas, growing up on the shore of CT, I have nothing to add.


Just realized that i had missed this---didint mean to ignore you!!--No the bones didnt soften--thenlard merely kept the air---and hence any airborne bacteria-away from the birds--and yes she reused it--she would pour off most it when they warmed up,into a can on the stove--that would be used like bacon drippings to fru stuff in. the sauce was a classic long simmered red sauce that was usually started with a BHoston butt being browned in the "sauce pot"before cooking the rest of the sauce and was simmered for DAYS till it was a deep rich burgundy color and the pork just fell apart and became incorporated in the mix. Once the birds were warmed and the excess lard poured of,they were covered in the sauce and simmered about 1/2 hr.
wanderingjew
Sirloin
RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2005/06/08 12:43:35
Just reviving a thread, which really, really, really, really, really, really, really really,reeeaaallllyyy, reeallllyy needs to brought back to life.
dbear
Cheeseburger
RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2005/06/08 15:07:09

Love red beans and rice with; sausage (any kind, preferably boudin or andouille; in NE, portugese linguica), pork chops,ham hocks. My favorite is at Lloyds in downtown Baton Rouge.

db
lstrohl
Junior Burger
RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2005/06/09 09:43:29
Fredericksburg, VA - Local traditions:
Salt fish, usually herring or shad, dredged in milk, rolled in flour and then fried on a grill. My favorite site for this local treat is Dinty Moores, 1607 Princess Anne St. On a cool autumn morning a plate of this served up with sliced tomatoes and a cup of black coffee will make you glad you showed up.
Beer&Snausages
Cheeseburger
RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2005/07/12 09:43:51
In Hawaii, regional cuisine is a mixture of different styles blending influences of Hawaiian, Samoan, Japanese, Chinese, Korean, Potugese, Filipino and others. Look for Saimin (better than Ramen) it's even served at McDonalds, Malasadas, Manapua, Portugese Sweet Bread (sold here as King's Hawaiian Bred). Try the dried & cracked seeds, dried lemon peel, candied mango slices, even the dried cuttlefish.

One thing that Hawaii had (not sure if they do now) was a banana Twinkie. These were made with bananas and were great. I've heard that Twinkies here on the mainland were made with bananas somewhere in their past.
1bbqboy
Filet Mignon
RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2005/07/12 09:56:09
http://www.kitchenproject.com/history/twinkie.htm
http://www.twinkies.com/mediaroom/twbackgrounder.asp
Rusty246
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2005/07/12 11:18:29
quote:
Originally posted by SouthHillbilly

In Southern WV it's beans and corn bread. . .
Pinto beans cooked for hours with a big ol chunk of hambone, pork or fatback thrown in. The cornbread has to be sweet.
Fill a bowl with beans, salt well, crumble the cornbread on top and mix it in, then sprinkle fresh chopped and crunchy raw onions on top.
Folks make it all different consistencies. It might be like soup or like pudding. Every restaurant featuring country cooking has "beans and cornbread."
Ya take ta likin it on about the second or third encounter.

This is what I had for supper Sunday evening along with a side of mustard greens. I prefer buttermilk cornbread to sweet though. My Mom will crumble cornbread in a tall glass and pour buttermilk over it and eat it with a spoon.
Beer&Snausages
Cheeseburger
RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2005/07/12 15:16:30
quote:
Originally posted by bill voss

http://www.kitchenproject.com/history/twinkie.htm
http://www.twinkies.com/mediaroom/twbackgrounder.asp


Bill, those had the banana filling, the ones in Hawaii that I remember the banana part was the cake portion. Must be due to all the bananas that they had there on the islands.
mr chips
Filet Mignon
RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2005/07/15 01:08:48
WJ, this is a fantastic thread. I finally read it all the way through. What an informative and interesting thread.
Two things come to min d when I think of uniquely Oregon cuisines. Oregon produces most U.S. Hazlenuts(I grew up calling them filberts) and local places make creative uses of the Hazlenuts My personal favorite is Burgerville"s use of them in a Hazlenut-Smoked Salmon salad that is my favorite lunch. Burgerville also features a Chocolate Hazlenut milkshake in the winter months.
Oregon also grows a lot of Marionberries and local bakers use them well. Marionberry scones, pancakes, muffins and pies are a proud regional speciality. Tillamook Ice Cream makes an excellent Marionberry pie ice cream
octopus
Cheeseburger
RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2005/07/15 17:15:14
In Upstate Ny, as per a few other posts, Fish Fries are the shiznit. You can't turn around with out walking into one, Bob and Ron's, Ted's, Harbor House. Nick's the list is endless.
There are also a few large immigrant groups upstate, Italian, There are a large ammount of italian places my favorite is the Villa Valente' in Averill Park. And Irish plenty O' Irish places in the albany area, Hurley's in albany, and the best, Burkies in North Troy aka The North End Tavern if its boiled forever and served with beer they probably have it Corned Beef may be the best anywhere (they also do a mean fish fry too)Depends on which night of the week you go in the have daily specials, Corned Beef, Fish Fries, Meat Loaf and some other stuff. Check it out if by some chance you are in the Capitaland area.
ctfrasier
Cheeseburger
RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2005/07/15 18:57:30
Here in Nashville we have a local specialty called hot chicken. It is basically fried chicken covered in spices, usually a sort of rub, served atop white bread. It is hotter than any buffalo wings I've ever had. There's a thread on this site under the chicken forum. If you visit Nashville this is a roadfood must have.
the grillman
Double Cheeseburger
RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2005/07/15 19:06:38
Here in St. Louis we've got an odd thing called a St Paul sandwich. Many of the lower-rent Chinese joints serve them. It's basically an eggfooyung patty served on white bread with lettuce, tomato, and mayo. I've tried a few, and can't seem to get the hang of them.

Toasted ravioli is everywhere around here; most of it prefab stuff, but like cheap ball park nachos, everyone eats it, no matter how bad it is.

My town is also home to brain sandwiches, served on rye bread with onion, pickle, and mustard, as well as a local barbecue speciality, deep-fried pig snouts.

wanderingjew
Sirloin
RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2005/07/15 19:37:37
quote:
Originally posted by ctfrasier

Here in Nashville we have a local specialty called hot chicken. It is basically fried chicken covered in spices, usually a sort of rub, served atop white bread. It is hotter than any buffalo wings I've ever had. There's a thread on this site under the chicken forum. If you visit Nashville this is a roadfood must have.


I wanted to try that when I was on my last baseball trip in April. I barely had one day in Nashville and the one place listed in the local paper entertainment paper that was closest to downtown was closed on Mondays. Well, there is always next time.
mayor al
Fire Safety Admin
RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2005/07/15 21:18:22

RE- The St Louis Snouts and brain Sandwiches. At the Henderson BBQ Festival a few weeks ago we checked with the usual vendors we see every year. The guys from St Louis had dropped the brain sandwich from their menu this year. They said the 'Mad Cow Scare' had killed (no pun) any requests for either the sandwich or the scrambled eggs and brains breakfast entree.
As for the Snouts. Getting several snouts soaked in sauce on a burger roll used to be one of our St Louis treats. Can you identify any place in particular that still serves them?
the grillman
Double Cheeseburger
RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2005/07/15 21:41:51
Mr. Mayor,

It's true that brain sandwiches are endangered due to made cow concerns (probably not that tragic, overall),, I have heard there are a couple bars in south City that still serve them. I personally have only partaken once, that was at home, cooked up by by grandparents. Not my favorite thing.

BBQ snoots (yes, snoots) are still served at C & K Barbecue. It was in one of the Stern's first books, I think. Jennings Station Road, not far from the airport.
mayor al
Fire Safety Admin
RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2005/07/15 22:11:38

Thanks, Last time I asked about them I spelled it snoots and was corrected by a bunch of folks (maybe they were all Arby's employees?).
We have seen them now and then as 'Fair Food' at some of the rural county fairs in So Illinois and Indiana.
wanderingjew
Sirloin
RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2005/08/20 12:03:58
This is what Road food is all about
ellen4641
Filet Mignon
RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2005/08/20 16:57:00
I love this topic, too !

now I've got to backtrack and read the other 14 pages of it !

(sometimes I'll print it out, and take a jog while I'm reading it)

Down here in the Atlantic City area it's sub sandwiches,(on the famous "Atlantic City" bread) and pizza joints. Most of the pizza joints make a decent (sometimes real good) cheesesteak.

But there are too many "bar and grill" type places down here posing as restaurants..........(very heavy on the "bar" part)

I'll walk in and mostly see people smoking and drinking at the bar...
In some places , I'd be about the only one in the "dining" section.
I did'nt like the vibes, and sure enough the food would be mediocre.

But thank goodness, I love to travel, and get out to either LA , Vegas, or south Florida every few months or so (love the LA roadfood scene)......also the NYC and Philly food...

ellen




gailie783
Junior Burger
RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2005/08/20 17:09:08
i grew up in the suburbs of philadelphia. of course, we had cheeststeaks and hoagies. we also had soft pretzels and "water ice"
ellen4641
Filet Mignon
RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2005/08/20 17:33:05
oops, I forget to mention the soft pretzels.........they truck them in to my Atlantic City area every morning......(and sell them at the local WaWa convenience stores, etc.)

Still does'nt taste as good as when one gets them in the morning fresh from the pretzel factory in south philly !! right out of the oven, over there on washington st.

ellen
MilwFoodlovers
Filet Mignon
RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2005/08/20 20:43:09
Don't forget Manitowoc, Green Bay and Two Rivers claim to fame, The Booyah.
A type of chicken stew with lots more "stuff", it's a staple of fundraisers for little leagues, volunteer firemen, etc.
Here's a recipe but no ones is as good as someone's mother's recipe

Wisconsin Chicken Booyah
This dish is famous in the Fox River Valley region — Green Bay, Wisconsin. Booyah and beer go great together. Booyah King, Bob Baye, of Green Bay, Wisconsin, has been making Booyah since about 1946 in 100-gallon cookers.


1 roasting or stewing chicken (about 4 pounds)
1 pound beef stew meat, with bones
1 pound pork stew meat, with bones
1/2 cup minced parsley
1 tablespoon salt
1 tablespoon rosemary
1 tablespoon thyme
1/2 teaspoon pepper
1/2 teaspoon sage
4 cups quartered potatoes
2 cups chopped onions
2 cups chopped celery
1 cup carrots, cut up
1 cup green beans, cut up
1 cup fresh peas
1 cup skinned, seeded, chopped tomatoes
2 lemons

Put chicken in a deep kettle with the beef and pork. Cover with boiling water. Bring slowly to a simmer, remove scum from the top, and add herbs and seasonings. Simmer very gently, covered, about 1 hour.

Remove chicken and, when cooled, take meat form the bones and cut into pieces. Let beef and pork continue to cook until tender, 45 minutes to an hour more.

Remove and let cool enough to remove meat from bones. Add vegetables to the broth and simmer 5 to 10 minutes.

Grate lemon rind and set aside; remove white pith and seeds from the lemons, chop the pulp, and add to the broth. Taste for seasoning. While vegetables are still crisp, return the meat pieces to the broth to heat through. Serve in large soup bowls and sprinkle with the lemon rind.

Serves 12 to 16.

wanderingjew
Sirloin
RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2006/01/06 18:38:56
I am completely amazed at some of the dusty old threads that have somehow been retrieved lately by some new as well as old posters. Thought I would dust off this old beaut and see if any of the new folks have anything to add.
RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2006/01/06 19:42:27
quote:
Originally posted by wanderingjew

I am completely amazed at some of the dusty old threads that have somehow been retrieved lately by some new as well as old posters. Thought I would dust off this old beaut and see if any of the new folks have anything to add.


Okay. What the hell was in the Diablo sandwich (from Smokey and
the Bandit)? I know there's a Diablo brand sandwich press,
but the movie had to have come first.

Has anybody had an A-Bomb? It's a Buffalo thing, although the
ones I had were in Orlando. Hot Italian sausage, sliced before
cooking so it would lie flat on the bun, capicolla, provolone,
lettuce, tomato, and onions, with hot wing sauce. Mayo, oil and
vinegar were optional. The place also had beef sandwiches on
salty kummelweck rolls, and malt vinegar for the fries. Curly
fries, a rarity in the early Eighties.

I miss J-C's Wing Shop. I once ate almost seventy-five wings there,
although I lost my enthusiasm after the first fifty. The place was
sold to some Guatemalans and the food went to hell, much like the
neighborhood. At the gas station next door you used to be able to
get White Rock sodas, the ones with the bare-breasted nymph on the
label.

http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0425/is_1_60/ai_77374288
(Possibly NSFW)

The only better soda ever made was Frank's of Philadelphia. I wish
I had a wyshniak right now.

TSP "Gimme a Diablo sandwich and a Dr. Pepper.
And make it snappy, I'm in a goddam hurry!"
roossy90
Sirloin
RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2006/01/06 21:16:48
quote:
Originally posted by gailie783

i grew up in the suburbs of philadelphia. of course, we had cheeststeaks and hoagies. we also had soft pretzels and "water ice"


Ok, ya got me, whats water ice?...
(blonde here)
roossy90
Sirloin
RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2006/01/06 21:18:01
Conch fritters and cracked conch sandwiches down in the Florida Keys..
I miss that chewy stuff!
NYNM
Filet Mignon
RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2006/01/06 23:48:18
quote:
Originally posted by roossy90

quote:
Originally posted by gailie783

i grew up in the suburbs of philadelphia. of course, we had cheeststeaks and hoagies. we also had soft pretzels and "water ice"


Ok, ya got me, whats water ice?...
(blonde here)


Water ice AKA "wooder rice" is what we NYrs call "Italian Ice" (in hard cardboard cup with lid or better, fresh scooped in a paper pleated squeeze cup)aka "Iceys" (tho that term is a bit generic,can be just used for popscilces, too)
roossy90
Sirloin
RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2006/01/07 15:33:55
Thanks for enlighting moi!
Tara
ScreenBear
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2006/01/07 19:38:52
I think the Canadian dish...French fries with cheese curd and brown gravy...is spelled Poutine. Talk about density of calories per cubic inch.

This is stick to your ribs food. Pretty good eatin', too.
The Bear
mayor al
Fire Safety Admin
RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2006/01/07 20:30:57
Screen Bear,
I have to ask... Is that pronounced(Southern Accent) "Poon Tang "? For a minute I was taken back 45 years to my old Army Memories!
roossy90
Sirloin
RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2006/01/07 21:20:49
quote:
Originally posted by Al-The Mayor-Bowen

Screen Bear,
I have to ask... Is that pronounced(Southern Accent) "Poon Tang "? For a minute I was taken back 45 years to my old Army Memories!


Tsk Tsk!
ScreenBear
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2006/01/07 23:25:46
Al,
I think it's pronounced a lot more like the Russian President's name...Putin. Here's a very apt and interesting definition, explanation, etc.

Poutine
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Poutine (pronounced, roughly, poo-tin, or peuh-tsin; is a popular snack consisting of french fries topped with fresh cheese curds and covered with hot gravy.

The curds' freshness is most important as it makes them soft in the warm fries, without completely melting. (When the curds are really fresh they will often squeak between the teeth.) While at first glance the dish may seem similar to American disco fries, poutine with melted cheese, shredded cheese, or cheese slices is not regarded as "genuine" poutine.

It originated in rural Quebec, Canada in the late 1950s and is now popular all over the eastern half of the country, especially in New Brunswick. Several communities claim to be the origin of poutine, including Drummondville, Quebec (by Jean-Pierre Roy) and Victoriaville, Quebec. The most popular tale is the one of Fernand Lachance, from Warwick, Quebec, which claims that poutine was invented in 1957, when a customer ordered fries while waiting for his cheese curds from the Kingsley cheese factory in Kingsley Falls (now in Warwick and bought by Saputo. Lachance is said to have exclaimed ça va faire une maudite poutine ("it will make a hell of a mess"), hence the name. The sauce was allegedly added later, to keep the fries warm longer. Linguists have found no occurrence of the word poutine with this meaning earlier than 1978.

The etymology of the word is a subject of much debate in Quebec. Many believe that it may be an adaptation of the English word pudding, the word being attested from the end of the 19th century in Oscar Dunn's Canadian French dictionary with the meaning of pudding. Still, Quebecer linguists think that the word evolved from Provençal poutingo, which means bad stew, under the phonetic influence of English pudding. It is purely coincidental that the name of the current President of Russia is written and pronounced "Vladimir Poutine" in French.

Poutine is a fast food staple in eastern Canada; it is sold by nearly all fast food chains (such as New York Fries and Harvey's) in the provinces, as well as by small diners and pubs. International chains like McDonalds, A&W, and Burger King now sell poutine across Canada, but their product is scorned by many as being an inferior reproduction. New York Fries has poutine on the menus of its U.S. outlets as well as those in Canada. Popular Quebec restaurants that serve poutine are Chez Ashton, La Belle Province (restaurant), and Lafleur's. Also, poutine is very popular in student cafeterias in high schools and universities.

mr chips
Filet Mignon
RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2006/01/08 00:43:12
Two of my favorite snacks in my ballpark travels were water ices at Citizen's Bank Park in Philadelphis last year and Poutine at Olympic Stadium in Montreal in 2002.
Sandy Thruthegarden
Double Cheeseburger
RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2006/01/08 18:06:28
Northern Kentucky shares Cincinnati's love of chili/spaghetti (Dixie Chili restaurants) and goetta (Newport, Kentucky's annual Goetta Fest). The quest for the best fried fish sandwich, however, is practically an obsession around here. Northern Kentucky had a large German (Bavarian) Catholic population at one time and that may be the reason that the fish sandwich competition heats up every year at Lent. Lots of Catholic churches have fish fries throughout Lent (the schedule is printed in the Cincinnati Enquirer every year) and there is a competition among the local restaurants. There's a lot of back and forth about cod vs. halibut, rye bread vs. any other kind of bread, beer batter vs. any other batter. Some restaurants that serve wonderful fried fish sandwiches include The Green Derby in Newport, the Greyhound Tavern in Ft. Mitchell, Mr. Herb's in Hebron. Barleycorn's (a local chain) also serves a pretty good fish sandwich.
I've had 'em all but I have to give the edge to Mr. Herb's. We had his fried cod last Friday. Oh, my, was it good.
ScreenBear
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2006/01/08 18:28:22
Sandy,
Do they serve fries of any sort with those fried fish sandwiches? If so, what type?
The Bear
Sandy Thruthegarden
Double Cheeseburger
RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2006/01/08 19:26:40
quote:
Originally posted by ScreenBear

Sandy,
Do they serve fries of any sort with those fried fish sandwiches? If so, what type?
The Bear


I don't think they serve fries at most of the church suppers, mostly chips. The restaurants usually offer a choice of potato pancakes, whipped potatoes, or regular (probably frozen ) fries. It's traditional to go with the potato pancake. Mr Herb's carry-out menu says one of their sides is "fried potatoes" but no french fries. I expect that Mr. Herb's serves thinly sliced home fries (heavenly if fried in bacon drippings). I had a side of butter beans on Friday and they were tasty. Also, the traditional bread is usually rye, particularly dark rye or marbled rye (light/dark).
Page: << < ..6789 > Showing page 7 of 9