Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location

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MikeS.
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/11/23 03:00:20 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by tamandmik

One more unique food, truly unique to maybe a 30 mile radius, is the Tarantini Panzarotti, which, essentially is a deep-fried calzone. This dish is extremely tasty, and uniquely South Jersey. My friends and family in North Jersey look at me like I have 3 heads when I describe it to them.


Well if it is a calzone then it has a much greater range then you think. There is a small family owned itialian restaraunt chain in the Fresno Calif area called DiCicco's. They are well known for the quality of their food. One of my favorites is the calzone, deep fried, covered in sauce, smothered in cheese and baked in the pizza oven until the cheese browns. You can also get w/o the sauce and extra cheese. Wonderful!
MikeS.
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/11/23 03:12:08 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by Lone Star

Bushie - you did not mention Pecos cantelopes, our beautiful, sweet fruits from the arid Pecos Valley. There is something about the soil there that makes them the best in the world.

Sorry LoneStar, gotta disagree. THE Best cantalopes come from the central San Jauquin valley of Calif. Especially around Firebaugh and Mendota. There just isn't a better melon then one of these picked ripe and fresh from the field, served chilled.

Boy how I miss the produce from Fresno.
MikeS.
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/11/23 03:21:01 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by Lone Star

Here it is Kim. I don't know if Rotel is a staple in pantries around the country, but no Texas home is without it!

KING RANCH CHICKEN


Sounds great! I've printed off the receipe and will try it soon. Thanks!

Mike
MikeS.
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/11/23 03:22:20 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by KimChee43

LUCKY BISHOP: Many thanks for the recipe! Ro-Tel tomatoes are easy to find in my area. I'll definitely give it a try!


Mine too, Podunk WVa. I use them all the time in my chili.

MikeS.
MikeS.
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/11/23 03:32:25 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by Lucky Bishop

Oh, dear lord, I keep forgetting that not everyone knows about Frito Pie.
There's also a homestyle version that's basically a casserole of chili and Fritos mixed together and spread in a pan, then topped heavily with cheese and baked for about 20 minutes.


My family, both sides, having come out of Texas (they got smart ) we always had at least one Frito Pie at family get-togethers.
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/11/23 03:53:54 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by Poverty Pete

As I was growing up in San Diego, I could go 30 feet offshore with a mask and snorkel and bring back a dozen abalone in just a few minutes. We always complained about the free abalone because you had to pound the steaks before you could eat them. There were also sea urchins by the thousands. When I moved to Hawaii, it was called Vana, then later, when I began eating sushi, it bacame uni. If only I had known. After a beach picnic of abalone steaks, we would take the ab shells home to use as ashtrays. I could feed a group of 15 or 20 on abalone steaks with about 10 minutes work. For those who didn't like abalone, I would also bring in a few lobsters, which I later learned were really langostas.


Unfortunately between the sea urchins, the re-emergence of seals and sea lions and not the least, the over fishing by humans it is almost impossible to get abalone anymore. When I was young we went abbing out of Morro Bay and would catch our limit. The pounding part wasn't so bad because when mom fried those steaks up we had some great eating. By the time I was 20, 26 years ago, Morro Bay and the rest of the central coast was for all intents fished out of abs. We had to go far North to get any and then the size and limit was greatly reduced.

Darn those pesky seals and sea lions eating all those tasty abs!
MikeS.
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/11/23 04:11:27 (permalink)
Bushie, we must have the same roots. I cook my pintos the same way you describe. When I use salt pork I rarely add any more salt. When I use ham hocks then I will. I like to finish off my bowl with my favorite hot sauce, Cholula.

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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/11/23 04:26:40 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by EliseT

I feel like I must represent, but most of our food in California can be traced back to another place. Offhand I can think of Cobb salad, SF Sourdough bread, date shakes, and Santa Maria style BBQ. We seem to do movements rather than specialties. We have Cal-mex and "California fusion", and the fad of eating fresh and in season started in California. Can any of my fellow left-coasters think of others?


I've got to agree, Calif seems to have a lot of food brought in from elsewhere. The biggest thing I miss is all the fresh field ripe produce. Be it citrus or vegetable or melons or fruit, Calif is definetely the place for produce.

Santa Maria TriTip is execellent and you can't get another sourdough bread anything like San Francisco fisherman's wharf.
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/11/23 04:51:08 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by tiki


LOVE Carnita's----when my wife was in grad school in San Diego we went to a restteraunt in Tijuana that specialized in carnitas---you order the meat by the kilo and they supplied all the fixins you could eat along with it" Fabulous stuff and dinner for 4 adults with appeties--with tip--$20---mexico is the only thing about San Diego that i miss!


You have got to be kidding! SD has so many great things going for it, especially the weather. I would live there in a heartbeat if I could afford to.
JimInKy
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/11/23 08:05:18 (permalink)
These foods took hold in the Bluegrass, the region immediately around Lexington, Kentucky, and the area is known for them:

Fried banana peppers

Beaten Biscuits

Beer Cheese (especially that made by the Hall family)

Salsify casserole (aka Faux Scalloped Oysters)

3 and 4 year old sugar cured hams

Spoon Bread

Mint Juleps

Chess Pie

Bourbon balls (candy)

Kentucky Hot Brown (A dish created in the kitchen at Louisville’s Brown Hotel. Country ham and turkey on toast, covered by a rich cheese sauce, and baked with slices of tomato and crispy bacon on top)

tiki
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/11/23 08:15:46 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by MikeSh

quote:
Originally posted by tiki


LOVE Carnita's----when my wife was in grad school in San Diego we went to a restteraunt in Tijuana that specialized in carnitas---you order the meat by the kilo and they supplied all the fixins you could eat along with it" Fabulous stuff and dinner for 4 adults with appeties--with tip--$20---mexico is the only thing about San Diego that i miss!


You have got to be kidding! SD has so many great things going for it, especially the weather. I would live there in a heartbeat if I could afford to.


Actually i also miss the radio---best radio in tne country--esp the NPR station---but we where there while my wife was at grad school at UCSC and lived in "East Lajolla"---what we called married student housing there---surrounded by malls and suburbia---it was a great place fo a walk but there was NO neighborhoods at all---thankfully the park system was awesome and the beaches were loaded with mussels that i seemede to alone in gathering---folks thought i was crazy--but they were great! About the weather--aty first it was great---after a while 70 degrees ALL THE TIME got to be---well --boring----especially when the only breakin the weather was flooding!!
JimInKy
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/11/23 08:43:17 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by wanderingjew

I've been reviewing some of the topics on this board and just thought it was necessary to bring back this one.

I'm going to be heading to Williamsburg VA for a few days before thanksgiving. I plan on going to Pierce's Pit BBQ for lunch this coming tuesday. I reviewed there web site and noticed that they have sweet potato sticks on their menu. Although I've had them before in other states, I heard they were invented in Virginia. Is that true


Pierce's has been a mystery to me for years. I once heard something good about them and then queried friends in Williamsburg. Pierce's got an okay report, but one that indicated any barbeque might suit their palate. I've done online searches on Pierce's, but didn't learn much. I'd love to hear what you think, as I've thought of visiting them if I'm in the area again sometime. I looked at my folder on Virginia bbq and found this copy on Pierce's saved from a N.C. barbeque site.

“Nice joint mostly populated by tourists speaking "foreign tongues". They cook Boston butts with coals from oak and hickory wood in closed pits. They are done in 5-6 hours. You would never know it, however, because they bury the meat in a tomato-based sauce that tastes like it might well have come from Georgia! Tasty, you couldn't sell that stuff for love or money across the state line in North Carolina.”

Of course this gentleman is being typically North Carolinian about que that differs from his regional preference. They have great que in Lexington and I go there often for the priviledge of enjoying it. But Lexington Dip isn’t the only good thing that can be added to smoked pork.


cunamara
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/11/23 12:44:37 (permalink)
Bishop,

In regard to: Periwinkles, sometimes on the menu as "sea snails." This is probably a Cantonese thing, but . . .

My long-gone Irish grandmother, who hailed from the west of Ireland (Clare), introduced me to the tedious pleasure of eating periwinkles when I was just a wee lad. We would collect them among the rocks along the Westerly RI shore and then she'd boil them up and serve them in their shells with a small bowl of melted butter for dipping. She used a sewing needle to pick each one out while singing "Snail, snail, put out your eyes" in her characteristic thick brogue. Discard the little, hard "lid", dip in the butter, and pop it in your mouth -- good eatin'.

Tom
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/12/04 09:50:50 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by MikeSh

quote:
Originally posted by Lone Star

Bushie - you did not mention Pecos cantelopes, our beautiful, sweet fruits from the arid Pecos Valley. There is something about the soil there that makes them the best in the world.

Sorry LoneStar, gotta disagree. THE Best cantalopes come from the central San Jauquin valley of Calif. Especially around Firebaugh and Mendota. There just isn't a better melon then one of these picked ripe and fresh from the field, served chilled.

Boy how I miss the produce from Fresno.


Never having knowingly had any cantaloupe from the area you mention, I can't make any valid comparison. However, I can't imagine any cantaloupe being significantly better than the Eastern Shore (of Maryland) 'loupes that I have purchased from roadside stands in that area. As you suggest, I think the key is the amount of time the melons spend in transit from the field to the consumer, and the extent to which they are allowed to ripen on the vine.
rbpalmer
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/12/04 10:03:51 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by JimInKy

quote:
Originally posted by wanderingjew

I've been reviewing some of the topics on this board and just thought it was necessary to bring back this one.

I'm going to be heading to Williamsburg VA for a few days before thanksgiving. I plan on going to Pierce's Pit BBQ for lunch this coming tuesday. I reviewed there web site and noticed that they have sweet potato sticks on their menu. Although I've had them before in other states, I heard they were invented in Virginia. Is that true



Pierce's has been a mystery to me for years. I once heard something good about them and then queried friends in Williamsburg. Pierce's got an okay report, but one that indicated any barbeque might suit their palate. I've done online searches on Pierce's, but didn't learn much. I'd love to hear what you think, as I've thought of visiting them if I'm in the area again sometime. I looked at my folder on Virginia bbq and found this copy on Pierce's saved from a N.C. barbeque site.

“Nice joint mostly populated by tourists speaking "foreign tongues". They cook Boston butts with coals from oak and hickory wood in closed pits. They are done in 5-6 hours. You would never know it, however, because they bury the meat in a tomato-based sauce that tastes like it might well have come from Georgia! Tasty, you couldn't sell that stuff for love or money across the state line in North Carolina.”

Of course this gentleman is being typically North Carolinian about que that differs from his regional preference. They have great que in Lexington and I go there often for the priviledge of enjoying it. But Lexington Dip isn’t the only good thing that can be added to smoked pork.





I would definitely give them a try the next time you're in the area. I've been there a couple of times during trips to Williamsburg, and have been very pleased both times. Obviously, if someone prefers NC style bbq, they're not going to be happy at Pierce's, since they don't serve that style. I would go and decide for myself.
i95
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/12/05 09:10:24 (permalink)
BTW, Pierce's now serves breafast. FYI.
Florox
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/12/30 20:41:07 (permalink)
Mainly just to bring this great topic back, here's some Cincinnati regionalism:

Chili (greek style), the best is at Camp Washington chili although you can find it all over at any one of the Skyline restaurants. Some also claim that the West side of Cincy is the home of "city chicken" (pork cubes on a stick), plus there's "Cincinnati oysters" (a slang term for pickled pig's feet). Then there's goetta. As scrapple is to Philadelphia, goetta is to Cincinnati. For the uninitiated, the German meat product is a combination of pinhead oatmeal, pork, beef and seasonings. Glier's Goetta Co. across the river in Covington is the planet's largest producer, selling nearly 1 million pounds a year.

RubyRose
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/12/30 21:00:26 (permalink)
This was really a wonderful thread.
GordonW
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/12/30 23:48:54 (permalink)
I grew up in the South Jersey/Philly area. Aside from the usual talk about cheese steaks and hoagies, scrapple is the regional specialty (read: stuff they don't eat nowhere else). Actually a Pennsylvania Dutch recipe ("pawnhaus"). The coolest kind is the one available in places like farmer's market meat shops (Columbus or Berlin, in NJ, were my places) where it comes in the big metal pans with at least a half-inch of fat on top. Slice it up and fry it. They argue about ketchup or not.

I worked in the Philippines for a long time. A guy I worked with, from Camden, always had a New Year's Day breakfast, and had scrapple brought in. He did it just to gross everyone out. An acquired taste. . . .

I live in North Carolina now. Never mind the bbq and slaw on the bbq sandwich. A big one here is slaw on hot dogs.
Jellybeans
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/12/31 07:58:35 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by Lucky Bishop

Living in Boston now, I can think of two local specialties that I've only ever seen in Chinese restaurants here:

1. Peking ravioli, commonly known locally as "ravs." Basically, these are potstickers, but they're fried browner and crisper than you see potstickers done in the rest of the country, and they tend to have a very gingery filling. This is extremely old-school Boston Chinese, now found only at the places where the chefs were taught by Joyce Chen herself.

2. Periwinkles, sometimes on the menu as "sea snails." This is probably a Cantonese thing, but because Boston's Chinatown is the only one I've become familiar with that's predominantly Cantonese rather than Schezwan, Boston is the only city in North America where I can be assured that I'll find periwinkles on the menu. (I'm told they're popular in Vancouver as well -- perhaps the first generations of Cantonese immigrants gravitated towards coastal cities to remind them of home!) They come piled about six inches high on the platter, little shells that look like miniature escargot, usually in a hot chili and black bean sauce with lotsa garlic. They give you a bowl of toothpicks and you go to it, picking up a shell and digging the toothpick on in there to spear the little nugget of meat. This is the sort of meal you order when you don't mind taking a while and you've got good conversational partners.


Lucky Bishop, what you described re the Peking Ravioli is Chinese culinary ingenuity at work. I've had this in various incarnations and it's the variation of the same thing. Usually served as part of the dim sum selection in Southeast Asia.

As for periwinkles, you nailed it--it's Cantonese all right although my mother's family (who are Hokkien) also eat them up. Basically, we Chinese eat pretty much all kinds of shellfish I remember eating them fried with paste made from dried chillies, dried shrimp paste and plenty of garlic and ginger! The way we eat it is like this (if you are talking about the conical little creatures I'm thinking of):

Suck the pointy end of the shellfish to loose it up, then use your fork/fingers/toothpick/whatever digging implement to get the succulent little things out. Makes a big mess but very fun and scrumptious!
wanderingjew
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/12/31 16:06:03 (permalink)
Thank you Florox for bringing this thread back to life! I was ready to do it myself considering some of the threads that have been lingering on here the last week or so!
i95
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/12/31 16:54:16 (permalink)
Not a single mention on this entire thread from any of you New Englanders about Whoopie Pies ?? What's wrong with you people?? You got Curt Schilling. You can take the black veils of now, Chowderheads.


BW
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/12/31 22:38:00 (permalink)
I spent 10 years in Arizona, and I always assumed that the green chile of New Mexico cuisine was the same as the Arizona variety. I finally made it to Santa Fe this year, and I was a little disappointed.

Green chile in Arizona is "chili," only green -- a thick stew of beef or pork or chicken cooked with the chiles themselves and onions, a little tomato, garlic, etc. It's used as a filling for burros (what they call burritos on most Arizona menus) and chimichangas (deep-fried burros, supposedly invented at El Charro in Tucson).

What I got when I ordered green chile in Santa Fe was a sauce made of little else but chopped green chiles. I also found "green chile stew," which was sort of like the Arizona variety, only not nearly as thick.

BW
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/12/31 22:53:10 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by TANFANRN

IN MICHIGAN, VERNORS GINGER ALE, BETTER MADE POTATO CHIPS, CONEY DOGS, AND SANDERS HOT FUDGE SUNDAES. ALSO MANY MIDDLE EASTERN RESTAURANTS SERVING THINGS LIKE HUMMUS, BABA GANOUJSH(SP), CHICHEN SHAWARMAS, FATOUSH, AND KEBABS GALORE. IN THE U.P. IT'S PASTIES AND SMOKED WHITEFISH.


And, of course, that tasty but cough-inducing Vernors with vanilla ice cream as a "Boston cooler." The complementary mix of spicy and creamy -- mmm.


Route 11
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/01/02 17:36:05 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by i95

Not a single mention on this entire thread from any of you New Englanders about Whoopie Pies ?? What's wrong with you people?? You got Curt Schilling. You can take the black veils of now, Chowderheads.





I though Whoopie Pies were more PA Dutch. I see themat Mennonite Markets here in VA. New England food to me is huge drippy grinders, cake doughnuts and Polish pierogies. I lived far inland (Westfield MA) so I didn't get to enjoy all that lobster except for special occasions.

Oh, and eating ice cream at sub-zero temperatures.
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/01/02 17:46:41 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by i95

Not a single mention on this entire thread from any of you New Englanders about Whoopie Pies ?? What's wrong with you people?? You got Curt Schilling. You can take the black veils of now, Chowderheads.





As a displaced New Yawka living in New England, I wouldn't know a Whoopie Pie from a Whoopie Cushion. Curt who?
i95
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/01/05 09:37:10 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by Grampy

quote:
Originally posted by i95

Not a single mention on this entire thread from any of you New Englanders about Whoopie Pies ?? What's wrong with you people?? You got Curt Schilling. You can take the black veils of now, Chowderheads.





As a displaced New Yawka living in New England, I wouldn't know a Whoopie Pie from a Whoopie Cushion. Curt who?


It's tough being a Yankees fan in Greenfield, Grampy, no ?
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/01/05 10:38:48 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by i95

quote:
Originally posted by Grampy

quote:
Originally posted by i95

Not a single mention on this entire thread from any of you New Englanders about Whoopie Pies ?? What's wrong with you people?? You got Curt Schilling. You can take the black veils of now, Chowderheads.





As a displaced New Yawka living in New England, I wouldn't know a Whoopie Pie from a Whoopie Cushion. Curt who?


It's tough being a Yankees fan in Greenfield, Grampy, no ?



Actually, I see more Yankees fans than those who root for that other team. Sox fans are already complaining that Schilling is probably going to have his worst year. Such optimists, no?
seafarer john
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/01/05 13:54:39 (permalink)
The cantalopes from the Hand family farm near Saratoga New York are without any doubt whatsoever the very best in the wolrd during a brief period of mid-summer. They are called "Hand Melons" and are available at the Saratoga race track among other places in the Saratoga area. I dont know if it is a secret family variety, or a result of the soil and micro climate that makes them so special, but they are great melons - worth the trip to Saratoga in August even if there wasn't a great track to visit.
JeffOYB
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/01/05 19:06:09 (permalink)
Hi all!

This is my first time posting to this site. I've been publishing "roadfood" tips myself for about 10 years and almost that long online at my website http://ouryourbackdoor.com.

I really liked the Epicurious "Just Folk" project that Michael Stern helped with some years back.

I think that hinterlands dining is where it's at. Also, that it needs the most help. I worry that it's fast disappearing. Because no one knows where it is. These are local secrets that are kept too local. The metro areas do just fine at taking care of themselves. Enough people there, eh.

OK, that's my intro. Here's specifically why I'm writing: I like the theme of this thread. However, it seems like the State Selector on the homepage is really what we need to do the trick. Only so far it looks like the Sterns only use that to list restaurants in their book. Here in this part of the Forum people freely give Regional Tips but they're totally disorganized. Or am I just not seeing how to use the Forum?

I see in the News section that they're going to charge for an advanced service of providing maps and restaurants. I hope it works out for them.

Oh, here's another intro-type of thought: I recall that Usenet used to have a great array of rec.good.eats Forums for every state and major city. Those were a great resource. But I can't seem to find them anymore.

Well, nice to be here! --Jeff Potter

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