Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location

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Sundancer7
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/01/05 19:47:29 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by JeffOYB

Hi all!

This is my first time posting to this site. I've been publishing "roadfood" tips myself for about 10 years and almost that long online at my website http://ouryourbackdoor.com.

I really liked the Epicurious "Just Folk" project that Michael Stern helped with some years back.

I think that hinterlands dining is where it's at. Also, that it needs the most help. I worry that it's fast disappearing. Because no one knows where it is. These are local secrets that are kept too local. The metro areas do just fine at taking care of themselves. Enough people there, eh.

OK, that's my intro. Here's specifically why I'm writing: I like the theme of this thread. However, it seems like the State Selector on the homepage is really what we need to do the trick. Only so far it looks like the Sterns only use that to list restaurants in their book. Here in this part of the Forum people freely give Regional Tips but they're totally disorganized. Or am I just not seeing how to use the Forum?

I see in the News section that they're going to charge for an advanced service of providing maps and restaurants. I hope it works out for them.

Oh, here's another intro-type of thought: I recall that Usenet used to have a great array of rec.good.eats Forums for every state and major city. Those were a great resource. But I can't seem to find them anymore.

Well, nice to be here! --Jeff Potter




Jeff: Your web site ain't there.

Paul E. Smith
Knoxville, TN
JimInKy
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/01/10 07:51:50 (permalink)
I imagine several of us know that Bushie's pinto beans are known throughout the southern Appalachian Mountains as “soup beans”. Pintos, cooked with salt pork or ham bone and seasoned with salt, once constituted the most common meal in the region. And in many pockets of Southern Appalachia, it continues to be one of the more common meals.

Soup beans, along with cornbread, literally saved thousands of malnourished families from extreme hunger and even starvation during The Great Depression years. In the depressed Eastern Kentucky coal fields of the 1950s, I went to school with many children whose diet at home consisted heavily of these beans cooked in a soupy fashion. No meal is more representative of the poorer regions of the southern mountains, or the South for that matter, than this one. I don't know what destitute people would have done without this cheap food during long winters in the era before food stamps.

Where I grew up, soup beans was a dish closely associated with poverty. At school I discovered some children and adults would not eat soup beans in public, as they didn't want to be connected with the provender so many poor people depended on.

We served pinto beans as a side dish and as bean soup once a week in our restaurant, but soup beans with corn bread was so popular that Mom could have served it every day.

I still love soup beans and, like Bushie, cook them lovingly in the traditional way. Many small town cafes in the southern mountains have soup beans on the menu at least once a week and some places serve it daily. The dish is always served with cornbread or corn cakes and onion.

There’s a cache about this meal nowadays. Club women in my home town host community soup bean dinner fundraisers. I went to one a few years ago, and noticed that people really come out for these dinners.

A soup bean meal at our house was pretty simple: freshly baked corn bread, green onions from the garden, thick, crispy fried country bacon and large bowls of the soupy beans. Properly cooked and seasoned, pinto beans (soup) are delicious. I've seen more than a few people raise their head after their first spoonful ever, and go something like, "Wow! This is delicious."

I’m thrilled our gracious Texas friend shared his pinto bean recipe with us, but I'll have to smile when I hear it called Bushie's Beans.


Rhodes
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/01/11 08:55:47 (permalink)
I was trying to think of unique regional cuisine by location from my former domicile of Toronto Canada, and I thought, and thought, and the only things I could come up with were back-bacon (aka Canadian bacon to you state-siders) sandwiches, poutine (a nasty combo of french fries topped with cheese curds and gravy, admittedly much-beloved by some), and butter tarts (think pecan-pie w/ raisins instead of pecans) - really really good. Mostly when I think of typical Toronto regional food, though, it's either vaguely american or british, or melting-pot ethnic - caribbean, east indian, asian, italian, greek, portugese, etc., etc. Now down here in Maryland they have some regional cuisine - go crab cakes!
lleechef
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/01/11 18:27:37 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by JimInKy



I’m thrilled our gracious Texas friend shared his pinto bean recipe with us, but I'll have to smile when I hear it called Bushie's Beans.




I grew up with an Italian Mother who is a fabulous cook and baker. However, beans were not one of the things she cooked very often (she wasn't raised on them) so we had the occasional chili with CANNED kidney beans. (Everybody can stop cringing now.) Cheffing throughout the Northeast I was always associated with fine dining restaurants and did make some bean soups, etc. but it never dawned on me to just cook a plain pot of beans with a ham bone and some salt. New Englanders like to add ketchup, brown sugar and all kinds of sweet goo.....so when I asked Bushie just exactly how those beans were cooked I tried them and pronounced them "Awesome!!" Henceforth, Bushie's Beans!

Growing up in western PA lots of folks worked in the coal mines and the steel mills. I remember my uncle taking "fried jumbo sandwiches" (fried bologna on white bread) and "chipped ham" sammiches. My mother visited me in Boston once and we went to the local store and she asked for 1/2 pound of chipped ham. They looked at her like she was nuts!

In Le Mars, Iowa I was with SO's mother in Fairway and asked for prosciutto. The nice young man behind the counter said, "Ma'am, I don't even know what that is."
Hiram Callahan
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/01/11 19:20:16 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by Sundancer7

quote:
Originally posted by JeffOYB

Hi all!

This is my first time posting to this site. I've been publishing "roadfood" tips myself for about 10 years and almost that long online at my website http://ouryourbackdoor.com.

I really liked the Epicurious "Just Folk" project that Michael Stern helped with some years back.

I think that hinterlands dining is where it's at. Also, that it needs the most help. I worry that it's fast disappearing. Because no one knows where it is. These are local secrets that are kept too local. The metro areas do just fine at taking care of themselves. Enough people there, eh.

OK, that's my intro. Here's specifically why I'm writing: I like the theme of this thread. However, it seems like the State Selector on the homepage is really what we need to do the trick. Only so far it looks like the Sterns only use that to list restaurants in their book. Here in this part of the Forum people freely give Regional Tips but they're totally disorganized. Or am I just not seeing how to use the Forum?

I see in the News section that they're going to charge for an advanced service of providing maps and restaurants. I hope it works out for them.

Oh, here's another intro-type of thought: I recall that Usenet used to have a great array of rec.good.eats Forums for every state and major city. Those were a great resource. But I can't seem to find them anymore.

Well, nice to be here! --Jeff Potter




Jeff: Your web site ain't there.

Paul E. Smith
Knoxville, TN


I think that Jeff made a little typo. If you try http://outyourbackdoor.com./, that's his site. In the lower right-hand corner there's a reference to RF's being like his "Local Spirit Forums." There's a link to the forums in the left-hand column.

If anybody checks it out, let us know what you find.
tiki
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/01/12 07:58:12 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by Larry Abraham

Originally posted by Sundancer7

Originally posted by JeffOYB

Hi all!


I think that Jeff made a little typo. If you try http://outyourbackdoor.com./, that's his site. In the lower right-hand corner there's a reference to RF's being like his "Local Spirit Forums." There's a link to the forums in the left-hand column.

If anybody checks it out, let us know what you find.


Its still not there
Bushie
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/01/12 09:09:38 (permalink)
Well, Larry my man, looks like you also made a typo; you put an extra dot and a comma on the end.

www.outyourbackdoor.com
tiki
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/01/12 12:51:07 (permalink)
yep--now its there--but i havent found much in the way of roadfood---fun site though!!needs futher investigation!
i95
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/01/12 14:32:33 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by clothier

I think my company's internet police (his name is Brian) would be a little less than thrilled to see I was visiting some site about backdoors, road-food related or not.

Hillbilly
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/01/12 15:23:52 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by GordonW



I live in North Carolina now. Never mind the bbq and slaw on the bbq sandwich. A big one here is slaw on hot dogs.

Like the ones at "Zack's" in Burlington, "Green's Lunch" in Charlotte and "Snoopy's" in Raleigh. People in other parts of the country think I've lost it when I ask for dogs with mustard, onions, slaw and chili. Sure would like a couple from Green's or Zack's right now along with a "Cheerwine".
narwhale
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/01/13 19:24:33 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by MikeSh

quote:
Originally posted by tamandmik

One more unique food, truly unique to maybe a 30 mile radius, is the Tarantini Panzarotti, which, essentially is a deep-fried calzone. This dish is extremely tasty, and uniquely South Jersey. My friends and family in North Jersey look at me like I have 3 heads when I describe it to them.


Well if it is a calzone then it has a much greater range then you think. There is a small family owned itialian restaraunt chain in the Fresno Calif area called DiCicco's. They are well known for the quality of their food. One of my favorites is the calzone, deep fried, covered in sauce, smothered in cheese and baked in the pizza oven until the cheese browns. You can also get w/o the sauce and extra cheese. Wonderful!


I'm from South Jersey- right across the Delaware from Philly and ten minutes outside Camden. I can vouch- the Tarantini Panzarotti is a Camden native. In fact, the original shop where they were first made is still open, in Camden. They are a deep fried version of a stromboli. I do believe they have a distribution of them now, so it's very possible the like have spread cross country. They did, of course, originate in Italy. The story is a bit vague though, but I think they weren't fried until they got here. Quite a treat.

Other foods besides the staples such as cheesesteaks (including chicken cheesesteaks and cheesesteak hoagies)and philly pretzels is scrapple (I know see someone else is the fan of the good ol' Berlin Mart. Man, what a dump that place is, eh? They want to tear it down, but I don't want to see it go).

Something I haven't seen yet is the mention of Salt Water Taffy for NJ. I suppose it's pretty widespread now, but I think it's origins are down the shore somewhere. Speaking of boardwalk fair, I always have to mention hoagies, waffles and ice cream and Johnson's carmel popcorn. Yeah they have them elsewhere, but they just don't seem to taste as good.

narwhale
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/01/13 19:29:34 (permalink)
Something I haven't seen anywhere but in Maine- baked beans with a breakfast of pancakes, sausage and syrup with a glass of piping hot coffee. I have it atleast once a year at a church event, and it gets better each time.

Maine also is the king of the Lobstah and Crab roll- Lobster or Crab tossed with a little mayo on a buttered and toasted split bun. They always hit the spot. And there's always Lobstah chowdah, a heavy cream and lobster with a pad of butter melted right on top. If you get it from the right places, you'll usually end up with a full lobster in a bowl and you'll be halfway to a heart attack.

Oh and another Maine dish is blueberry anything- my favorites are blueberry pie, blueberry cobbler and blueberry pancakes. Again, like my last post, alotof these foods can be found elsewhere, but they arent as good, thats for sure.
Sundancer7
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/01/13 19:39:43 (permalink)
How about the Blueberry soft serve ice cream in Bar harbour and the Blueberry beer also in Bar Harbour

Paul E. Smith
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chinesegirl
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/01/13 19:56:23 (permalink)
I had lobster ice cream in Bar Harbor. That was some experience
Grampy
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/01/13 20:08:04 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by chinesegirl

I had lobster ice cream in Bar Harbor. That was some experience


Garlic ice cream at the garlic festival out here.
narwhale
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/01/13 21:24:29 (permalink)
Ay yes blueberry beer and ice cream. The blueberry beer is quite a tourist trap I reckon, but hey that's why we're listing these things, aren't we?

Blueberry ice cream, however, is quite good. Speaking of Ice Cream, if it's from Maine, it's got be Gifford's! http://www.giffordsicecream.com/
Poverty Pete
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/01/13 22:48:57 (permalink)
Callahan's brewpub in San Diego has had blueberry ale on tap for well over a decade now. It's quite popular, and at the same time, quite undrinkable.
mblaze
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/01/17 09:45:49 (permalink)
I like this idea, but think it can be refined a bit to be even better. Perhaps a standard format for submissions so that a user can search on a region, state, city, etc. and then identify local delicacies.

mblaze
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/01/17 09:56:07 (permalink)
Now my sibmission:

I grew up in the Capital District area of New York State. There were a few places we called "fish fries" that remain very popular. Ted's, Deet's, Harbor House, and Gallagher's to name a few. Local diners like Bubble's in Mechanicville and the Parkway in Clifton Park also have them on the menu.

Basically a long strip of white fish, probably cod, is breaded in cracker meal, deep fried, and served on a hot dog roll. Its topped with "chili sauce" which, in reality, is little more than ketchup and pickle relish blended together. Tartar sauce is also available for the non-locals.

The treat to this feast in your fist was the "tail", a crunchy piece of fried fish that hung off the end of the bun, that would usually be broken off and savored separately.

I've since relocated to New York City where there is nothing like a fish fry served. I am well-travelled in the USA and have never enjoyed a fish fry outside NY's Albany-Schenectady-Troy area.

Does anybody know where else I can get one?
fogwater
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/01/17 11:21:28 (permalink)
Hi. Dispatch from CanaDada:

Where I live, Lunenburg County, NS, we've got Lunenburg sausage & Puddin (that would be meat puddin). Sauerkraut is real big here too. If I drew a triangle around me, 2 of the points would be Tancook Sauerkraut & Krispi Kraut. The 3rd point would be the Atlantic. Some other specialties: Solomun Gundy, hodge podge & smeltz potatoes. As with most things, though, there is probably crossover with other east coast Maritime communities. "Unique" is never thoroughly so. Especially since North America is a land of immigrants. We'd have to go way back to find the original unique cuisines, although a lot can be found still, like bannock or fry bread & venison stews. There were a lot of German settlers here, so you'd probable find similar dishes in Germany. People like their tea here, too, which is a British thang. And, at Christmas, 'Chicken Bones', a candy.
Rhodes
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/01/17 12:03:28 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by fogwater

Hi. Dispatch from CanaDada:

Where I live, Lunenburg County, NS, we've got Lunenburg sausage & Puddin (that would be meat puddin). Sauerkraut is real big here too. If I drew a triangle around me, 2 of the points would be Tancook Sauerkraut & Krispi Kraut. The 3rd point would be the Atlantic. Some other specialties: Solomun Gundy, hodge podge & smeltz potatoes. As with most things, though, there is probably crossover with other east coast Maritime communities. "Unique" is never thoroughly so. Especially since North America is a land of immigrants. We'd have to go way back to find the original unique cuisines, although a lot can be found still, like bannock or fry bread & venison stews. There were a lot of German settlers here, so you'd probable find similar dishes in Germany. People like their tea here, too, which is a British thang. And, at Christmas, 'Chicken Bones', a candy.


Some other features of NS/East Coast Canada cuisine: Bologna in several forms (i.e., `wax' bologna, slabs of various sizes and shapes), Scallops (esp. Digby), smoked salmon (hot and cold cures), Sussex ginger ale, `extra salt' butter - that was a new one for me! Ditto on the great local love of sauerkraut and stews of all kinds - one thing I've never seen elsewhere in grocery stores is `stew packs' - an assorted package of vegetables with two or three carrots, potatoes, turnips etc - basically all that you need for stew besides meat.
fogwater
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/01/17 13:24:22 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by Rhodes

quote:
Originally posted by fogwater

Hi. Dispatch from CanaDada:

Where I live, Lunenburg County, NS, we've got Lunenburg sausage & Puddin (that would be meat puddin). Sauerkraut is real big here too. If I drew a triangle around me, 2 of the points would be Tancook Sauerkraut & Krispi Kraut. The 3rd point would be the Atlantic. Some other specialties: Solomun Gundy, hodge podge & smeltz potatoes. As with most things, though, there is probably crossover with other east coast Maritime communities. "Unique" is never thoroughly so. Especially since North America is a land of immigrants. We'd have to go way back to find the original unique cuisines, although a lot can be found still, like bannock or fry bread & venison stews. There were a lot of German settlers here, so you'd probable find similar dishes in Germany. People like their tea here, too, which is a British thang. And, at Christmas, 'Chicken Bones', a candy.


Some other features of NS/East Coast Canada cuisine: Bologna in several forms (i.e., `wax' bologna, slabs of various sizes and shapes), Scallops (esp. Digby), smoked salmon (hot and cold cures), Sussex ginger ale, `extra salt' butter - that was a new one for me! Ditto on the great local love of sauerkraut and stews of all kinds - one thing I've never seen elsewhere in grocery stores is `stew packs' - an assorted package of vegetables with two or three carrots, potatoes, turnips etc - basically all that you need for stew besides meat.


Hi, Rhodes! Yeah, bologna is called Newfie Steak sometimes. Also can't forget oat cakes, which vary from thick to thin, sweet to not so, from region to region. Hard tack biscuits. Queen Elizabeth cake. Scallops for sure! Yum...big juicy scallops wrapped in bacon & baked. Rum a plenty.
Cakes
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/01/21 21:32:01 (permalink)
I remembered this when I posted a message about PBR in Milwaukee.

I learned to love blue cheese dressing as a child and my favorite was Archie's from Archie's Wayside Inn in LeMars, Iowa. I traveled quite a bit from NW Iowa to Wisconsin for various reasons. It got to be a game with me when I would order salad. I would ask for Roquefort cheese dressing and the waitress would say we don't have that. I would then say OK I'll have blue cheese. OK The next time I would request blue cheese dressing and be told they had none..........how about Roquefort? Sure!

I am sure that none of these resturants served Roquefort.

When I got to SE Wisconsin I found that things changed. If I ordered blue cheese I got a glob of sour cream with blue cheese crumbles. Not bad but not what I was used to. What I was used to was called "creamy blue cheese".

2 State separated only by a common language.

Cakes
spweimerskirch
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/01/22 15:34:19 (permalink)
Hate to admit it but what about deepfried kosher dills, or snickers?. Pulled Pork Tacos? Cappelini Natasha? Just a few from an otherwise overlooked top 10 Fattest/Overweight Cities in the U.S., Columbus, Ohio.
Cheers,
Shannon
wanderingjew
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/01/22 15:52:47 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by spweimerskirch

Hate to admit it but what about deepfried kosher dills, or snickers?. Pulled Pork Tacos? Cappelini Natasha? Just a few from an otherwise overlooked top 10 Fattest/Overweight Cities in the U.S., Columbus, Ohio.
Cheers,
Shannon


Deep fried dill's were invented in Mississippi.
Hapamama
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/01/22 20:52:44 (permalink)
I just wanted to give a heartfelt thanks for the discussion of soup beans, as well as the recipe. I grew up in central WV and have been craving a good bowl of soup beans which can't be found in the Pacific NW. Every time I Googled "pinto beans" I got these crazy recipes w/tomatoes and other stuff in them! Finally I realized I needed to be looking for soup beans instead of pinto beans, who knew other people used pinto beans for different purposes! I'll be enjoying some soup beans and buttermilk cornbread soon! Blessings!
spweimerskirch
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/01/24 18:49:18 (permalink)
WanderingJew,
I love your flare and sense of food. Just a quick observation from Junior Burger..
lileo
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/01/24 23:36:18 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by wanderingjew

<blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<div style="border: 1px #999999 solid; background-color: #DCDCDC; padding: 4px;">Originally posted by Sundancer7

In East Tennessee, it is difinately country ham, grits, collards, corn bread, fried corn, fried okra, country sausage, fried eggs in sausage oil, sausage gravy, green beans, tomatoes, onions, blackberry pie, apple pie, pumpkin pie, bisquits and whatever.

Paul E. Smith
Knoxville, TN


Yumm!

I can hear my arteries clogging already!
lileo
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/01/24 23:37:48 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by wanderingjew

<blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<div style="border: 1px #999999 solid; background-color: #DCDCDC; padding: 4px;">Originally posted by Sundancer7

In East Tennessee, it is difinately country ham, grits, collards, corn bread, fried corn, fried okra, country sausage, fried eggs in sausage oil, sausage gravy, green beans, tomatoes, onions, blackberry pie, apple pie, pumpkin pie, bisquits and whatever.

Paul E. Smith
Knoxville, TN


Yumm!

I can hear my arteries clogging already!


That last post didn't go quite right!
Someone told me once, after I'd described a meal I'd been taken to in Vicksburg, MS, that "they fry the water down there". And a more apt description has never been offered.
It was a heavenly meal, but 2 years later I'm still trying to get it off of my thighs.
lileo
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2004/01/24 23:48:33 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by wanderingjew

<blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<div style="border: 1px #999999 solid; background-color: #DCDCDC; padding: 4px;">Originally posted by jpatweb

In my native Connecticut, New Haven style pizza is perhaps the food most identified with the state. White clam pies, in particular, are a specialty. Along the coastline from West Haven to the Rhode Island border, lobster rolls drenched in butter (not the lobster salad type) are prevalent and sinful. Statewide, there is a very strong hot dog culture. Split buns, which add to the hot dog experience, are a Connecticut specialty that hasn't crossed over to too many, if any, other places. Also, steamed cheeseburgers, though found in only a small pocket of the state, are a true Connecticut treasure.

In my adopted area of Washington, DC, half smokes seem to be the only regional food of note. Dirty water types sold from carts on the street are repulsive and should be avoided at all costs. Finer versions can be had from Ben's Chili Bowl in the District and the much-less heralded Weenie Beanie in Arlington, Virginia.


How about chicken pies in Central Connecticut and Bean Pies in DC? I remember a few years ago being in DC and seeing alot of "Bean Pie" vendors.


I live just outside of DC (Virginia side), worked in the city for years, and I have no idea what a Bean Pie is!
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