Welcome Back New Orleans!

Page: 12 > Showing page 1 of 2
Author
UncleVic
Sirloin
  • Total Posts : 6025
  • Joined: 2003/10/14 14:56:00
  • Location: West Palm Beach, FL
  • Status: offline
2006/01/11 22:33:35 (permalink)

Welcome Back New Orleans!

Kitchens are starting to hum again down in the Big Easy..
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20060110/ts_nm/hurricanes_cooking_dc

#1

59 Replies Related Threads

    improviser
    Double Cheeseburger
    • Total Posts : 865
    • Joined: 2003/07/03 17:48:00
    • Location: Clemson, SC
    • Status: offline
    RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/11 23:23:27 (permalink)
    What a great idea. While there are so many little things that can never truly be replaced, these skillets will be put to good use, making true "comfort" food. I know that when I think of a cast iron skillet, I think of my great-grandmother, who used hers well into her nineties, providing great food and great memories for her clan. It's great that hurricane survivors will be able to use these pans to make new memories for their families.

    New Orleans is coming back. It was wounded, hurt bad, but it wasn't killed.
    #2
    sfcwoodret
    Junior Burger
    • Total Posts : 2
    • Joined: 2006/01/12 08:32:00
    • Location: Live Oak, FL
    • Status: offline
    RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/12 08:46:38 (permalink)
    We'll begin to enjoy it again around 2020.
    #3
    BT
    Filet Mignon
    • Total Posts : 3589
    • Joined: 2004/07/03 13:19:00
    • Location: San Francisco, CA
    • Status: offline
    RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/12 12:03:25 (permalink)
    "The Black Iron Skillet Project collects and distributes seasoned frying pans . . . ."

    Long ago I read about people falsely claiming to be a Katrina victim in order to get in on the money the Feds were handing out. It seemed outrageous. But THIS is tempting . . . .
    #4
    BT
    Filet Mignon
    • Total Posts : 3589
    • Joined: 2004/07/03 13:19:00
    • Location: San Francisco, CA
    • Status: offline
    RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/12 17:47:20 (permalink)
    From today's Wall Street Journal:
    quote:
    Some live oaks have toppled, and many magnolias have died, but all the way to the French Quarter, the shops and restaurants are open, and people have come home.

    There are crowds taking a number for po' boy sandwiches at Domilise's on Annunciation, locals lunching on shrimp remoulade and trout amandine at Galatoire's, and browsers examining the silver ice buckets at Lucullus Antiques on Chartres Street. The Camellia Club of New Orleans is holding its 66th annual show on Saturday; schools are opening; and plans are set for the Zulu and Rex parades on Mardi Gras, just seven weeks away. With supply short and demand strong, rents have soared. Real estate records are being set.


    Shrimp remoulade at Galatoire's . . . oh my, oh my!
    #5
    roossy90
    Sirloin
    • Total Posts : 6695
    • Joined: 2005/08/15 16:17:00
    • Location: columbus, oh
    • Status: offline
    RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/12 18:22:39 (permalink)
    Ferdie at Mothers!
    Yum!
    #6
    lleechef
    Sirloin
    • Total Posts : 6629
    • Joined: 2003/03/22 23:42:00
    • Location: Gahanna, OH
    • Status: offline
    RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/13 02:34:39 (permalink)
    John G with Debris at Mother's!
    Double yum!

    I love the idea of giving cast iron skillets away. How are you gonna make gumbo without cast iron? You're not! Kudos to the folks involved in this project.
    #7
    azure
    Hamburger
    • Total Posts : 98
    • Joined: 2005/06/30 14:20:00
    • Location: raleigh, NC
    • Status: offline
    RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/13 11:12:06 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by BT

    From today's Wall Street Journal:

    quote:
    Some live oaks have toppled, and many magnolias have died, but all the way to the French Quarter, the shops and restaurants are open, and people have come home.

    There are crowds taking a number for po' boy sandwiches at Domilise's on Annunciation, locals lunching on shrimp remoulade and trout amandine at Galatoire's, and browsers examining the silver ice buckets at Lucullus Antiques on Chartres Street. The Camellia Club of New Orleans is holding its 66th annual show on Saturday; schools are opening; and plans are set for the Zulu and Rex parades on Mardi Gras, just seven weeks away. With supply short and demand strong, rents have soared. Real estate records are being set.


    Shrimp remoulade at Galatoire's . . . oh my, oh my!


    Oh my, Oh my, indeed. I, for one, will not wait until 2020. I'm headed down not only to enjoy Galatoire's (among many, many others), but with the hope that my dollars spent will help advance the repair of my beloved home town. There is no place like it, in heart or spirit, food or fancy, and that it will rise again is no surprise.
    #8
    signman
    Double Chili Cheeseburger
    • Total Posts : 1743
    • Joined: 2000/10/23 05:15:00
    • Location: Baltimore, MD
    • Status: offline
    RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/13 12:11:29 (permalink)
    Anybody know about the Camellia Grill?
    #9
    sizz
    Double Chili Cheeseburger
    • Total Posts : 1685
    • Joined: 2004/02/12 00:12:00
    • Location: San Jose, CA
    • Status: offline
    RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/13 13:05:05 (permalink)
    I personally feel a bit uneasy about the Big Easy.............. perhaps it's psychological, but to me it will never be the same .. too many visuals in my memory from the freeeken TV reports of a city engulfed in a sewer back up.... mud, grime, the stench of living things no longer living and devastated people, angry people, greedy people, poor people .............. I for one lost my appetite for this great city and would rather continue living with the memory of what NO was............. let the Mississippi River take it's course.....
    #10
    Michael Hoffman
    Double-chop Porterhouse
    • Total Posts : 18259
    • Joined: 2000/07/01 08:52:00
    • Location: Gahanna, OH
    • Status: offline
    RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/14 15:16:33 (permalink)
    I know that many people are turned off by Emeril Lagasse, but he does do some mighty fine things.

    NEW ORLEANS (AP) -- The little restaurant in an old store serves up some of the city's finest cuisine, but it isn't listed on the many tour guides that steer gourmets to the likes of Galatoire's or Commander's Palace. Still, in a city were food is a major interest, those in the know have discovered Cafe Reconcile and flock to it for what one customer calls "Southern cooking with New Orleans flair."

    Started as an experiment in 2000, Cafe Reconcile works with teenagers in danger of being swallowed up by life on the streets, teaching them skills they need to work in the city's thriving restaurant industry. At the same time the nonprofit eatery was also fueling economic vitality and growth in the area and giving local folks a place to meet. ...

    ... Since the hurricane, the cafe has started a $1.5 million fundraising campaign to keep the program running and complete renovations. Among its supporters are Chef Emeril Lagasse, who has supported the restaurant through his foundation.

    On a recent night he used a rare evening off from his restaurants to cook dinner for the police and fire fighters that work in the area, as well as local families and other guests. He also surprised restaurant officials with the announcement of a $25,000 donation.

    "I just thought, 'Why wait?'" Lagasse said. "Everybody is waiting, some are forced to wait, but I would like to see things move ahead here."



    For the complete story:

    http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/K/KATRINA_TEEN_CAFE?SITE=FLTAM&SECTION=US
    #11
    EliseT
    Filet Mignon
    • Total Posts : 2876
    • Joined: 2001/07/11 13:25:00
    • Location: L.A, CA
    • Status: offline
    RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/16 21:20:01 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by fpczyz

    I personally feel a bit uneasy about the Big Easy.............. perhaps it's psychological, but to me it will never be the same .. too many visuals in my memory from the freeeken TV reports of a city engulfed in a sewer back up.... mud, grime, the stench of living things no longer living and devastated people, angry people, greedy people, poor people .............. I for one lost my appetite for this great city and would rather continue living with the memory of what NO was............. let the Mississippi River take it's course.....


    When I saw the people lying in the gutters outside the convention center and realizing people were dying right on the exact spot where I caught beads, it was the worst feeling. But this is not the first disaster this city has seen. It was built on slavery, voodoo, crooked polititians, swamplands, floods, and cemetaries. It will come back.

    I live in Los Angeles. Not too long ago I watched my city burned and looted. And we are doing just fine.
    #12
    saps
    Double Chili Cheeseburger
    • Total Posts : 1560
    • Joined: 2003/08/18 16:22:00
    • Location: wheaton, IL
    • Status: offline
    RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/16 21:34:00 (permalink)
    I don't know if I'd use LA as an example. Out of over 300 metro areas, it is considered in the top 25 most dangerous.
    #13
    BT
    Filet Mignon
    • Total Posts : 3589
    • Joined: 2004/07/03 13:19:00
    • Location: San Francisco, CA
    • Status: offline
    RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/16 22:03:53 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by fpczyz

    I personally feel a bit uneasy about the Big Easy.............. perhaps it's psychological, but to me it will never be the same .. too many visuals in my memory from the freeeken TV reports of a city engulfed in a sewer back up.... mud, grime, the stench of living things no longer living and devastated people, angry people, greedy people, poor people .............. I for one lost my appetite for this great city and would rather continue living with the memory of what NO was............. let the Mississippi River take it's course.....


    Coming from the "little boutique town" you love to deride which had what may have really been the worse natural disaster in US history (at least if measured by the number of dead--3000+) in 1906, I think they'll come back strong and I badly want them to. Like New Orleans, most of my home town was rubble and 6 years later it had been rebuilt completely and hosted a world's fair:



    I think your attitude about this is pessimistic in the extreme.
    #14
    EliseT
    Filet Mignon
    • Total Posts : 2876
    • Joined: 2001/07/11 13:25:00
    • Location: L.A, CA
    • Status: offline
    RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/17 23:41:33 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by saps

    I don't know if I'd use LA as an example. Out of over 300 metro areas, it is considered in the top 25 most dangerous.


    That's just cause I'm here

    #15
    azure
    Hamburger
    • Total Posts : 98
    • Joined: 2005/06/30 14:20:00
    • Location: raleigh, NC
    • Status: offline
    RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/18 11:35:38 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by BT

    quote:
    Originally posted by fpczyz

    I personally feel a bit uneasy about the Big Easy.............. perhaps it's psychological, but to me it will never be the same .. too many visuals in my memory from the freeeken TV reports of a city engulfed in a sewer back up.... mud, grime, the stench of living things no longer living and devastated people, angry people, greedy people, poor people .............. I for one lost my appetite for this great city and would rather continue living with the memory of what NO was............. let the Mississippi River take it's course.....


    Coming from the "little boutique town" you love to deride which had what may have really been the worse natural disaster in US history (at least if measured by the number of dead--3000+) in 1906, I think they'll come back strong and I badly want them to. Like New Orleans, most of my home town was rubble and 6 years later it had been rebuilt completely and hosted a world's fair:



    I think your attitude about this is pessimistic in the extreme.


    Thanks for this, BT. I cannot comprehend the arguement that New Orleans should be wiped off the map because of this disaster. Quite the opposite, rebuilding and preserving is not only the right thing to do but it is a lesson for generations to come. Not everything can or should be thrown away. We'd lose a lot if we dismantled every place that was ever vulnerable to natural disaster.
    #16
    azure
    Hamburger
    • Total Posts : 98
    • Joined: 2005/06/30 14:20:00
    • Location: raleigh, NC
    • Status: offline
    RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/18 11:39:48 (permalink)
    And signman, Camellia Grill has not yet reopened...but everyone's hoping.
    #17
    signman
    Double Chili Cheeseburger
    • Total Posts : 1743
    • Joined: 2000/10/23 05:15:00
    • Location: Baltimore, MD
    • Status: offline
    RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/18 17:23:35 (permalink)
    Thanks azure, From the data I've seen, it appears Riverbend did not suffer as much flooding as other areas north and east, so I would have expected them to be open, but apparently there have been problems.
    #18
    azure
    Hamburger
    • Total Posts : 98
    • Joined: 2005/06/30 14:20:00
    • Location: raleigh, NC
    • Status: offline
    RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/22 20:04:55 (permalink)
    New Orleans update in today's New York Times travel section:

    http://travel2.nytimes.com/2006/01/22/travel/22going.html?pagewanted=1&8td&emc=td
    #19
    garryd451
    Double Cheeseburger
    • Total Posts : 705
    • Joined: 2004/12/28 23:37:00
    • Location: dowagiac, MI
    • Status: offline
    RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/22 23:15:56 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by UncleVic

    Kitchens are starting to hum again down in the Big Easy..
    http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20060110/ts_nm/hurricanes_cooking_dc




    I don't know, the media is Saying great things are happeningg, then the next week, they're telling how bad it still is! Last week on the nightly news on one of the major 3 networks, they reported that more than 1/3 of the population of New Orleans may not return and that only 20% of the FEMA 20,000 FEMA Tempory Mobile Homes have been delivered, hooked up and moved into!

    Then this week, the media is reporting all the good stuff tht is going on, down there, it be interesting to see what they report this week! Will it be "THE GOOD, THE BAD OR THE UGLY?"
    #20
    Greymo
    Filet Mignon
    • Total Posts : 3710
    • Joined: 2005/11/30 08:54:00
    • Location: Marriottsville, MD
    • Status: offline
    RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/23 08:28:02 (permalink)

    Last week, I spoke with a woman who had just arrived home from spending 3 weeks in NO as part of a large volunteer group. For all it is worth, she was very pessimistic about the whole area. She said the one thing that was very difficult for all to endure was the overwhelming odor of mold which was every where. She said at least a third of her group came home ill.

    Also interesting, was that they all went down and stayed in their own travel trailers. She said some of the volunteers that they spoke with were staying in hotels that still had broken windows.
    #21
    Sundancer7
    Fire Safety Admin
    • Total Posts : 13475
    • Joined: 2001/07/18 14:10:00
    • Location: Knoxville, TN,
    • Status: offline
    RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/23 09:01:47 (permalink)
    I do not know the status of the FEMA mobile homes but I do know that I have been traveling interstates a lot recently and the roads are clogged with extra wide mobile homes traveling in convoys that block traffic. I understand this is necessary but I have seen hundreds of these hoomes on interstate.

    They do not look very fancy but I am sure they are better than where some of these misplaced folks have been staying.

    Paul E. Smith
    Knoxville, TN
    #22
    garryd451
    Double Cheeseburger
    • Total Posts : 705
    • Joined: 2004/12/28 23:37:00
    • Location: dowagiac, MI
    • Status: offline
    RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/23 14:17:00 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Sundancer7

    I do not know the status of the FEMA mobile homes but I do know that I have been traveling interstates a lot recently and the roads are clogged with extra wide mobile homes traveling in convoys that block traffic. I understand this is necessary but I have seen hundreds of these hoomes on interstate.

    They do not look very fancy but I am sure they are better than where some of these misplaced folks have been staying.

    Paul E. Smith
    Knoxville, TN


    I don't know the status of the FEMA mobile homes either, by my post, I was just stating that it seems to me that we are getting alot of diiferent messages from the News Media on what is really happening down there!
    #23
    1bbqboy
    Filet Mignon
    • Total Posts : 4580
    • Joined: 2000/11/20 16:52:00
    • Location: Rogue Valley
    • Status: offline
    RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/24 09:55:40 (permalink)
    This hits home, even though I've never been to New Orleans. "Doc" is a well known BB referee here in the Rogue Valley, and is known and loved by all.
    He told us a few weeks ago he was going back down there, but I, didn't expect this bleak report....
    http://www.mailtribune.com/archive/2006/0123/local/stories/01local.htm

    Leroi Dedeaux says the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina still haunts his New Orleans family members, who are displaced and crammed together in homes without electricity.
    Mail Tribune / Jim Craven
    Still suffering Katrina’s wrath

    A Rogue Valley man returns to New Orleans to help family members rebuild

    By JOHN DARLING
    for the Mail Tribune

    His family had lived in New Orleans for almost a century. Now, after Hurricane Katrina, their homes are destroyed and their jobs gone. They are the Dedeaux clan, some 90 relatives of longtime Rogue Valley resident Leroi Dedeaux.

    Dedeaux, membership director at the Ashland YMCA, started a fund at Washington Mutual in Ashland and collected more than $8,000 from local residents and friends he’d made in his 35 years here. Last month, he flew to New Orleans to pitch in — and to start writing checks to family members.

    It helped. All his relatives now have food, water and a roof over their heads, although 11 are crammed in the house of his sister, Gwen, across the Mississippi River in Harvey, La. They’re sleeping on the floor, are living without electricity and have endured being told by both the Federal Emergency Management Agency and the American Red Cross first that they’d have to leave, then that they could stay, said Dedeaux, 55.

    "You can see it (New Orleans) on TV, but once you’re there, it’s like nothing I ever experienced in my life," said Dedeaux, who grew up in the Ninth Ward, just east of downtown. "It’s so devastated, with cars and fridges thrown on top of houses and wild dogs circling you like they haven’t eaten in forever."

    Advertisement
    Four months after Hurricane Katrina, Dedeaux had the unpleasant chore of finding a dead body "by locating the stench" and having it pulled out of debris by authorities, he said.

    "How can I find a body unless they’re still dragging their feet and not really caring?" Dedeaux said. "They’ve made the devastation a tourist attraction and you see buses of people from all over the U.S. in there taking pictures."

    Dedeaux’s relief fund went to help kin keep going with the basics of life, but none can relocate to their former homes, which were completely submerged and are contaminated, collapsed or completely gone, he said.

    Many of his 90-member clan have relocated to nearby cities: Shreveport, Baton Rouge, Galveston, San Antonio, and also into Tennessee and North Carolina. His 93-year-old mother, whom he’d planned to bring back to his Talent home, was hospitalized with exhaustion and chest pains and was unable to travel.

    The hardship in the wake of Hurricane Katrina has taken its toll on all his family, Dedeaux said. Much of his time during his 12 days in his sister’s crowded home was spent keeping the peace. His experience in New Orleans left him with enough post-traumatic stress that he’s getting therapy.

    News reports of entrenched poverty, corruption and racism in New Orleans were no surprise to Dedeaux, who grew up with it and "had no question in my mind that it (the slow response to Katrina) was about racism," he said.

    His relatives "don’t think about it because it’s all they know," he said. "They’re true Louisiana people. But I can see it because I got away."

    Dedeaux came to the Rogue Valley in 1971, recruited for football at then-Southern Oregon College. He was defensive back, captain of the team and all-conference two years in a row, going on to a life connected with sports, including being a basketball referee with the Rogue Valley Officials Association.

    "Sports is the only way a black person can get out of there. It’s not ‘Ozzie and Harriet’ down there. You have to work every day and night to survive," he said. "People say, well, why don’t you (his kin) go back there. They don’t know the hardship. There’s nothing to go back to."

    An African-American, Dedeaux’s life in the mostly white Rogue Valley has been good to him, he said. "I’m a loving person and if they don’t make me feel black, I won’t make them feel white."

    Dedeaux worked 14 years as manager of Geppetto’s Restaurant and has many friends and acquaintances who "have been unbelievable, opened their arms and bent over backwards" at the idea of sponsoring displaced relatives here. But, he said, "it’s like pulling teeth" to get them to imagine a new life elsewhere.

    Dedeaux plans another trip back to help kin sometime in the next few months. His "New Orleans Family Relief Fund" is still receiving contributions at Washington Mutual, 243 E. Main St., Ashland OR 97520.


    #24
    azure
    Hamburger
    • Total Posts : 98
    • Joined: 2005/06/30 14:20:00
    • Location: raleigh, NC
    • Status: offline
    RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/24 12:13:14 (permalink)
    bv,
    Doc's account is not dissimilar from the reports from my family in New Orleans. I just received devistating photos showing shells of homes in the middle of the street, artifacts of peoples lives strewn about like debris. It's absolutely gripping. Recovering from this side of Katrina's aftermath will take years. Thousands of lives and families are changed forever. The city will never be the same...rebuilt, perhaps, but never the same. And my heart is torn by the juxtaposition of celebratory restaurant openings for fortunate locals and hopeful tourists and what we all know is going on at the grass roots level. I don't know how to reconcile that. But I continue to hope and pray. And dream dreams that include fried oysters, french bread so light it could float away, and Galatoire's on a Thursday afternoon. Is that so wrong?
    #25
    V960
    Double Chili Cheeseburger
    • Total Posts : 2429
    • Joined: 2005/06/17 09:25:00
    • Location: Kannapolis area, NC
    • Status: offline
    RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/24 17:16:18 (permalink)
    NOLA not rebuilding? No way in hell. Adult Disney world WILL rebuild. Florence has been sinking and that tower in Piza has been leaning for HOW long.

    OK, it's a bad location but the Hilton and Montelone alone are worth keeping. Not to mention Commander's Palace, Brennan's and K'Pauls.
    #26
    the ancient mariner
    Filet Mignon
    • Total Posts : 3987
    • Joined: 2004/04/06 21:00:00
    • Location: st petersburg, florida
    • Status: offline
    RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/24 17:25:56 (permalink)
    The labor shortage for restaurant help is overwhelming. The restaurants and shoppes may be open but with no help the waiting will be long and the preparation underwhelming. A rush to open may result in more harm than good.
    #27
    sizz
    Double Chili Cheeseburger
    • Total Posts : 1685
    • Joined: 2004/02/12 00:12:00
    • Location: San Jose, CA
    • Status: offline
    RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/28 19:56:37 (permalink)
    The coach had put together the perfect team for the New Orleans Saints.
    The only thing missing was a good quarterback. He had scouted all
    the colleges and even the Canadian and European Leagues, but he
    couldn't find a ringer who could ensure a Super Bowl victory.

    Then one night, while watching CNN, he saw a war-zone scene in
    Afghanistan. In one corner of the background, he spotted a young
    Afghan Muslim soldier with a truly incredible arm. He threw a
    hand-grenade straight into a window from 80 yards away. Then he
    threw another from 50 yards down a chimney, and then hit a
    passing car going 80 miles per hour.

    I've got to get this guy!" coach said to himself. "He has the
    perfect arm!"

    So, he brings the young Afghan to the States and teaches him the
    great game of football ...... and sure enough the Saints go on
    to win the Super Bowl.

    The young Afghan is hailed as a hero of football, and when the
    coach asks him what he wants, all the young man wants to do is
    call his mother.

    "Mom," he says into the phone, "I just won the Super Bowl!"

    "I don't want to talk to you," the old Muslim woman says. "You
    deserted us. You are not my son!"

    "Mother, I don't think you understand," pleads the son, "I've
    just won the greatest sporting event in the world!"

    "No! let me tell you," his mother retorts. "At this very moment
    there are gunshots all around us. The neighborhood is a pile of
    rubble. Your two brothers were beaten within an inch of their
    lives last week, and I have to keep your sister in the house so
    she doesn't get raped!"

    The old lady pauses then tearfully says, " I will never forgive
    you for making us move to New Orleans!"
    #28
    BT
    Filet Mignon
    • Total Posts : 3589
    • Joined: 2004/07/03 13:19:00
    • Location: San Francisco, CA
    • Status: offline
    RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/28 21:47:17 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by the ancient mariner

    The labor shortage for restaurant help is overwhelming. The restaurants and shoppes may be open but with no help the waiting will be long and the preparation underwhelming. A rush to open may result in more harm than good.


    It's truly a chicken/egg situation: No reopening means no jobs which means no point in returning for a lot of people. Go ahead and reopen serving whatever sort of limited menu you have to to start putting people back to work. If there are good jobs, I think people will find a way to come back. I'll go to Mother's if all they offer is roast beef with debris gravy, Galatoire's no matter what they serve, K-Paul's as long as there's something with pecans in it on the menu. I really don't see how getting back to even limited business could do "more harm than good".

    Meanwhile, fpczyz's description of New Orleans is, I think, a bit outdated. My guess is it's far safer right now than it used to be. Fair or not, most of the poor people, including those disposed to crime, have probably left town at least for now and the ratio of law enforcers to enforcees is much higher than it used to be.
    #29
    BT
    Filet Mignon
    • Total Posts : 3589
    • Joined: 2004/07/03 13:19:00
    • Location: San Francisco, CA
    • Status: offline
    RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/28 22:03:47 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by azure

    bv,
    Doc's account is not dissimilar from the reports from my family in New Orleans. I just received devistating photos showing shells of homes in the middle of the street, artifacts of peoples lives strewn about like debris. It's absolutely gripping. Recovering from this side of Katrina's aftermath will take years. Thousands of lives and families are changed forever. The city will never be the same...rebuilt, perhaps, but never the same. And my heart is torn by the juxtaposition of celebratory restaurant openings for fortunate locals and hopeful tourists and what we all know is going on at the grass roots level. I don't know how to reconcile that. But I continue to hope and pray. And dream dreams that include fried oysters, french bread so light it could float away, and Galatoire's on a Thursday afternoon. Is that so wrong?


    Of course it's not wrong. I don't see any painful juxtaposition here. Since the "War Between the States" (as it might be called down that way) wrecked the cotton and sugar economy, New Orleans has depended on tourism, oil and its port. The poorer folks depend on those businesses as much as the rich--either for jobs or for the tax money that pays for welfare. The oil industry suffered a lot of damage but with oil at record prices, that indistry is rapidly pulling itself together. The port is doing likewise more slowly. Its' tourism and peripheral industries like seafood that remain, as they say, under water. But if New Orleans is to rise, it'll be done by private industry resuming and finding there is money to be made which requires a work force which necessitates putting money into housing and all the other things. No matter what the Federal government has promised, they are already backing away from their promises and I doubt New Orleans will be rebuilt by government, but I do think it will be rebuilt as a somewhat smaller version of itself if government gets out of the way. By that I mean, cut out these stupid building moratoriums and red tape. Just let people do what they want to do with their own money and it'll come back as San Francisco and Chicago did in the last 2 centuries. Oh, and it might help if they elected somebody a little more competent and less divisive as Mayor.
    #30
    Page: 12 > Showing page 1 of 2
    Jump to:
    © 2014 APG vNext Commercial Version 5.1