Whistlin' Dixie

Page: < 12345.. > >> Showing page 2 of 6
Author
Nancypalooza
Filet Mignon
  • Total Posts : 3778
  • Joined: 2004/06/17 14:39:00
  • Location: Columbia, SC
  • Status: offline
Re:Whistlin' Dixie 2012/09/10 20:24:58 (permalink)
love2bake is absolutely correct--to do macaroni & cheese right you have to start with a bechamel sauce (picture a proper Southern lady saying 'becha-whuuut?') so if you're using a recipe that doesn't call for a roux (browning onions in a lot of butter and then whisking flour into it, pouring milk into that and letting it come up slow and thicken), you have a bad recipe and it's going to break your heart.
 
/waving at everybody!  Very sad that Dale didn't get any good 'nanner puddin so far.
#31
cementhead
Cheeseburger
  • Total Posts : 124
  • Joined: 2005/03/18 20:11:00
  • Location: Lancaster Co Pa
  • Status: offline
Re:Whistlin' Dixie 2012/09/10 21:55:06 (permalink)
What is country fried steak supposed to be? Always thought it was the same as chicken fried steak.
#32
billyboy
Double Chili Cheeseburger
  • Total Posts : 2392
  • Joined: 2005/01/23 02:28:00
  • Location: New York City, NY
  • Status: offline
Re:Whistlin' Dixie 2012/09/10 22:50:15 (permalink)
Lovin' it Dale!  Can't wait to see more.  
 
Nancy, does roux usually include onions?  I make my mac & cheese bechamel with butter, flour and milk then whisk in hot sauce, mustard, white pepper and lots of extra sharp cheddar and smoked gouda.
#33
Foodbme
Porterhouse
  • Total Posts : 10100
  • Joined: 2006/09/01 14:56:00
  • Location: Gilbert, AZ
  • Status: offline
Re:Whistlin' Dixie 2012/09/11 00:32:45 (permalink)
cementhead
What is country fried steak supposed to be? Always thought it was the same as chicken fried steak.

There's a whole discussion on the subject in here:
http://www.roadfood.com/Forums/Chicken-Fried-Steak-m80602.aspx
#34
Nancypalooza
Filet Mignon
  • Total Posts : 3778
  • Joined: 2004/06/17 14:39:00
  • Location: Columbia, SC
  • Status: offline
Re:Whistlin' Dixie 2012/09/11 07:24:38 (permalink)
It wouldn't have to--I don't think that means it's a 'roux'--but I don't think I've ever used a recipe that didn't use onions.
#35
pnwchef
Double Chili Cheeseburger
  • Total Posts : 2358
  • Joined: 2011/03/16 14:15:00
  • Location: Kennewick, WA
  • Status: offline
Re:Whistlin' Dixie 2012/09/11 08:55:32 (permalink)
Nancypalooza

It wouldn't have to--I don't think that means it's a 'roux'--but I don't think I've ever used a recipe that didn't use onions.


Hi Nancy, the Roux is butter and flour, used to thicken Gravy and soups etc. The Bechamel sauce is a Mother sauce, used as a starter for Cheese sauce and many other sauces............pnwc
#36
pnwchef
Double Chili Cheeseburger
  • Total Posts : 2358
  • Joined: 2011/03/16 14:15:00
  • Location: Kennewick, WA
  • Status: offline
Re:Whistlin' Dixie 2012/09/11 09:42:20 (permalink)
Foodbme

cementhead
What is country fried steak supposed to be? Always thought it was the same as chicken fried steak.

There's a whole discussion on the subject in here:
http://www.roadfood.com/Forums/Chicken-Fried-Steak-m80602.aspx


When I came out to the PNW, the name Country fried/Chicken fried were the same thing. We made our version out of Top round, that was run through a cuber. Our version was platter size cubed beef, dredged in a seasoned flour then fried on the flat grill in some oil.
  When I lived on the East Coast, I never saw a Chicken fried steak or Country fried steak in any restaurant. What I saw, mostly in Diners and home cooking, were breaded Veal Cutlets. Veal cutlets were thin slices of veal ( this is when we could afford veal) put in a egg wash then seasoned flour and pan fried. This was served with a beef type gravy, never really saw a country gravy on anything other than biscuits. In my later years in the kitchen I serves a version of the chicken fried steak with beef gravy calling it a Beef cutlet. My feeling is, these are all versions of the "schnitzel" the south took the idea and covered it with country gravy, up north they did their version with brown gravy. My feeling is, if you have a good tasting gravy, it would go great on just about anything.............pnwc
#37
wanderingjew
Sirloin
  • Total Posts : 7681
  • Joined: 2001/01/18 18:49:00
  • Location: East Greenwich/ Warwick, RI
  • Status: offline
Re:Whistlin' Dixie 2012/09/11 09:58:05 (permalink)
I've learned there is clearly a difference between Chicken Fried Steak and Country fried steak..
-
Chicken fried steak, typically served in Texas, Oklahoma and Kansas, is breaded, deep or pan fried and served with white cream gravy on top or on the side.
-
Country fried steak, mostly found in the Meat n Three's in the South, is floured, baked and simmered in brown gravy and onions.....
-
Glad to hear from Nancypalooza since she makes her appearance in the next chapter!
#38
MiamiDon
Filet Mignon
  • Total Posts : 4306
  • Joined: 2006/09/08 07:12:00
  • Location: Miami, FL
  • Status: offline
Re:Whistlin' Dixie 2012/09/11 12:04:18 (permalink)
So "country-fried steak" is not fried?  Just baked and braised?
#39
Bruce Bilmes and Susan Boyle
Double Chili Cheeseburger
  • Total Posts : 1350
  • Joined: 2000/07/12 11:09:00
  • Location: Robbinsville, NJ
  • Status: offline
Re:Whistlin' Dixie 2012/09/11 14:03:21 (permalink)
I kinda thought the same about it as Dale, but looking around on the net, I would have to say that most people seem to use the terms country-fried steak and chicken-fried steak interchangeably. A significant minority, though, call this country-fried steak: you fry up the steak like for chicken fried steak, then braise it for a while in a brown, oniony and/or mushroomy gravy. If I consider ordering country-fried steak in the future, I'll definitely ask them which it is.
#40
HollyDolly
Double Chili Cheeseburger
  • Total Posts : 1069
  • Joined: 2006/01/18 16:52:00
  • Location: Schertz, TX
  • Status: offline
Re:Whistlin' Dixie 2012/09/11 14:07:49 (permalink)
Nice photos and report. Chicken fried steak here in Texas is always served with white cream gravy.Never seen it with brown gravy. As far as cornbread goes, i like mine moist.Don't care if it's sweet or not, just don't like dry cornbread. Oh, what a cute puppy.Glad you had fun with your relatives. I'm not a fan of banana pudding,and don't go out of my way to order the stuff anywhere. It might taste better if you make it from scratch, or you use the Jello pudding mix you actually have to cook.
I don't think I would like that coleslaw either.
#41
Foodbme
Porterhouse
  • Total Posts : 10100
  • Joined: 2006/09/01 14:56:00
  • Location: Gilbert, AZ
  • Status: offline
Re:Whistlin' Dixie 2012/09/12 01:23:49 (permalink)
WJ, BB & SB,
What you call Country Fried Steak is what Alton Brown & I call a version of SWISS STEAK:
Swiss Steak Recipe courtesy Alton Brown, 2006
Prep Time: 45 min Inactive Prep Time: -- Cook Time: 2 hr 30 min Level: Easy Serves: 4 to 6 servings

Ingredients 2 pounds beef bottom round, trimmed of excess fat 2 teaspoons kosher salt 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 3/4 cup all-purpose flour 1/4 cup vegetable oil or bacon drippings 1 large onion, thinly sliced 2 cloves garlic, minced 2 stalks celery, chopped 1 tablespoon tomato paste 1 (14.5-ounce) can diced tomatoes 1 teaspoon smoked paprika 1 teaspoon dried oregano 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce 1 1/2 cups beef broth

Directions

Preheat the oven to 325 degrees F.
Cut the meat with the grain into 1/2-inch thick slices and season on both sides with the salt and pepper. Place the flour into a pie pan. Dredge the pieces of meat on both sides in the flour mixture. Tenderize the meat using a needling device, until each slice is 1/4-inch thick. Dredge the slices on both sides once more and set aside.
Add enough of the bacon drippings or vegetable oil to just cover the bottom of a 4 to 5-quart Dutch oven set over medium-high heat. Once the oil begins to shimmer, add the steaks to the pan, being careful not to overcrowd. Cook until golden brown on both sides, approximately 2 minutes per side. Remove the steaks to a plate and repeat until all of the steaks have been browned.
Remove the last steaks from the pot and add the onions, garlic, and celery. Saute for 1 to 2 minutes. Add the tomato paste and stir to combine. Next add the tomatoes, paprika, oregano, Worcestershire sauce and beef broth and stir to combine. Return the meat to the pot, submerging it in the liquid. Cover the pot and place it in the oven on the middle rack. Cook for 1 1/2 to 2 hours or until the meat is tender and falling apart.
 


//
#42
wanderingjew
Sirloin
  • Total Posts : 7681
  • Joined: 2001/01/18 18:49:00
  • Location: East Greenwich/ Warwick, RI
  • Status: offline
Re:Whistlin' Dixie 2012/09/12 08:22:31 (permalink)
Bruce is correct about country fried steak, there is the frying process first before its  baked. I know Paul aka Sundancer 7, has previously described the process
 
HollyDolly

I don't doubt that the best chicken fried steak is in Texas (and Oklahoma too btw)
The one I enjoyed at Hoovers in Austin is some  of the best I've had
 
Foodbme
 Swiss Steak or not, it's beeing served by Meat n Threes all over the south as "Country Fried Steak"
 
 
I will continue with the next chapter this evening.
post edited by wanderingjew - 2012/09/12 08:23:39
#43
Michael Hoffman
Double-chop Porterhouse
  • Total Posts : 18267
  • Joined: 2000/07/01 08:52:00
  • Location: Gahanna, OH
  • Status: offline
Re:Whistlin' Dixie 2012/09/12 11:36:54 (permalink)
I don't know. Around here country fried steak is virtually the same as chicken fried steak and is served with a cream gravy. No baking or braising.
#44
wanderingjew
Sirloin
  • Total Posts : 7681
  • Joined: 2001/01/18 18:49:00
  • Location: East Greenwich/ Warwick, RI
  • Status: offline
Re:Whistlin' Dixie 2012/09/12 11:53:28 (permalink)
Michael Hoffman

I don't know. Around here country fried steak is virtually the same as chicken fried steak and is served with a cream gravy. No baking or braising.

Michael,
I can see how the difference could lose its definition outside of its regional surrounding (If I were visiting Columbus I would  personally not  order Chicken fried or country fried steak) Here in RI, BBQ means baked pork or chicken with a candy sweet red glaze enveloping it, however what may be advertized as Texas Style BBQ could possibly more or less resemble Memphis style BBQ Regional variations mean nothing
#45
Michael Hoffman
Double-chop Porterhouse
  • Total Posts : 18267
  • Joined: 2000/07/01 08:52:00
  • Location: Gahanna, OH
  • Status: offline
Re:Whistlin' Dixie 2012/09/12 12:05:38 (permalink)
Actually, the country fried steak around here is generally found at Southern themed, or Southern style restaurants such as TeeJay's. The baked or braised version is usually called baked steak in those same places, although at Dee's Diner near Nelsonville, Ohio it's what THEY call Swiss steak.
 
 
#46
wanderingjew
Sirloin
  • Total Posts : 7681
  • Joined: 2001/01/18 18:49:00
  • Location: East Greenwich/ Warwick, RI
  • Status: offline
Re:Whistlin' Dixie 2012/09/12 12:21:28 (permalink)
Michael Hoffman

Actually, the country fried steak around here is generally found at Southern themed, or Southern style restaurants such as TeeJay's. The baked or braised version is usually called baked steak in those same places, although at Dee's Diner near Nelsonville, Ohio it's what THEY call Swiss steak.



 
I understand, but Columbus is almost as "Yankee" as Rhode Island 
#47
Michael Hoffman
Double-chop Porterhouse
  • Total Posts : 18267
  • Joined: 2000/07/01 08:52:00
  • Location: Gahanna, OH
  • Status: offline
Re:Whistlin' Dixie 2012/09/12 12:38:44 (permalink)
wanderingjew

Michael Hoffman

Actually, the country fried steak around here is generally found at Southern themed, or Southern style restaurants such as TeeJay's. The baked or braised version is usually called baked steak in those same places, although at Dee's Diner near Nelsonville, Ohio it's what THEY call Swiss steak.




I understand, but Columbus is almost as "Yankee" as Rhode Island 

Well, when you consider that around Columbus, pronounced C'lumbus by so many of those who live here in Cowtown, it's a lot like Appalachia (pronounced Ap-uh-LATCH-uh), with roots deep in West Virginia, Tennessee and Kentucky ...
 
I'm just sayin'

#48
wanderingjew
Sirloin
  • Total Posts : 7681
  • Joined: 2001/01/18 18:49:00
  • Location: East Greenwich/ Warwick, RI
  • Status: offline
Re:Whistlin' Dixie 2012/09/12 12:47:27 (permalink)
Michael Hoffman

wanderingjew

Michael Hoffman

Actually, the country fried steak around here is generally found at Southern themed, or Southern style restaurants such as TeeJay's. The baked or braised version is usually called baked steak in those same places, although at Dee's Diner near Nelsonville, Ohio it's what THEY call Swiss steak.




I understand, but Columbus is almost as "Yankee" as Rhode Island 

Well, when you consider that around Columbus, pronounced C'lumbus by so many of those who live here in Cowtown, it's a lot like Appalachia (pronounced Ap-uh-LATCH-uh), with roots deep in West Virginia, Tennessee and Kentucky ...

I'm just sayin'

 
From an outsider, Columbus was distinctively "midwestern" even Cincinnati which lies 100 miles south was still distinctively "midwestern" both were very similar to Pittsburgh which is where I lived for 5 years. Now you go about 1/2 hour south of Cincinnati and that's another story...
#49
ScreamingChicken
Filet Mignon
  • Total Posts : 4978
  • Joined: 2004/11/05 14:36:00
  • Location: Stoughton, WI
  • Status: offline
Re:Whistlin' Dixie 2012/09/12 13:53:32 (permalink)
wanderingjew

Now you go about 1/2 hour south of Cincinnati and that's another story...
And it's quite possibly about a man named Jed.
#50
wanderingjew
Sirloin
  • Total Posts : 7681
  • Joined: 2001/01/18 18:49:00
  • Location: East Greenwich/ Warwick, RI
  • Status: offline
Re:Whistlin' Dixie 2012/09/12 18:18:36 (permalink)
ScreamingChicken

wanderingjew

Now you go about 1/2 hour south of Cincinnati and that's another story...
And it's quite possibly about a man named Jed.

 
Missed it by one state- Jed's from Tennessee, just like our own Sundancer 7  
#51
3 Olives
Cheeseburger
  • Total Posts : 101
  • Joined: 2012/01/14 14:37:00
  • Location: Charlotte, NC
  • Status: offline
Re:Whistlin' Dixie 2012/09/12 18:42:55 (permalink)
Country fried steak in the Southeast is cubed steak dredged in seasoned flour and fried. Swiss steak is not Country Fried Steak. There is NO baking.
#52
wanderingjew
Sirloin
  • Total Posts : 7681
  • Joined: 2001/01/18 18:49:00
  • Location: East Greenwich/ Warwick, RI
  • Status: offline
Re:Whistlin' Dixie 2012/09/12 19:10:33 (permalink)
Wednesday August 29

I started out with a scone and and an ok cuppa coffee at Immaculate Consumption, located downtown also recommended by Nancypalooza.  I was then curious to compare with Drip in Five Points. As it turns out Drip is not drip but "pour over" style. 
Again it was ok, but I preferred their Iced Coffee from the day before. 
 
After checking out of my hotel, I decided to visit the State Capitol Building
 
 
T

 
The Grounds are dotted with monuments of famous and perhaps some "infamous" South Carolinians.
 

 

 
 

 
 
Even this rascal has a monument in his memory.
 
There is also a monument dedicated to the African Americans of South Carolina
 

 
The interior looked quite familiar. In fact I found out that it was modeled after the Texas State Capitol which I visited this past spring.
 

 
 

 
 
Here's the the house chamber
 

 
and the Senate Chamber
 

 
 

 
And a total overview looking down
 

 
And a view of the dome looking up.
 
 

 
Nearby I observed this marker apparently noting where the state house used to be located.
 
 
Walking around downtown, there were a few landmarks that caught my attention.
 

 
A mural for a  restaurant that is apparently long gone
 

 
 

 
Now I know why they call Columbia "Cola Town"
 
 
 
 
 

 
Before lunch I decided to drive over to the State Farmer's Market located in West Columbia..
 
 

 
As you can see, there just wasn't much there.
 
That was somewhat dissapointing. I guess I was expecting more..
 
Lunchtime was fast approaching and I was looking forward to my next stop.
 

 
True BBQ
 
Located in West Columbia
 

 
Home of the pretty lady and sexy lady bbq sauce.
That's a good sign when you see the smoker right there in the parking lot
 
A few minutes after I got there, Nancypalooza  arrived. 
 
Nancypalooza has been touting True BBQ for awhile and I was really looking forward to it.
 
It was good to visit with Miss Nancy again as I hadn't seen her since the Glee Club President's Day weekend event in Charleston back in 2010.
 
Here are the choice of sauces...
 


 
(from l to r)  Vinegar Red, Sexy Lady and Pretty Lady
My only gripe - no squirt bottles.
 
I ordered the pork and ribs combo plate
 

 
The ruggedly smoked pork combo of Miss White and Mr Brown comes "unsauced" but I added the traditional South Carolina mustard style "pretty lady" sauce to mine...
 

 
 
The ribs  are "baby back style" I usually prefer Spare Ribs or St Louis style" but even these nicely smoked ribs had good chew...
 

 
Hash and Rice come with the meal and I chose slaw and mac n cheese as my sides (their collards weren't ready yet)
The Mac N cheese was decent and the slaw pedestrian, however True BBQ advertises their Hash and Rice as the best in SC. I don't know if they were the best, but man...they were good.....I could have easily gotten another order if I wanted to....
 
Nancypalooza and I discussed her recent PHD, a little politics and SC History and my trip to date and where I was heading afterwards. I  also vented my frustrations about not being able to find good nanner pudding. 
 
As we left we saw the owner smoking ribs out in the parking lot. I shook his hand and complimented him on his fine Q. 
 
Nancypalooza was right on about True BBQ. Truly the best meal in SC (and I will have one more in the final chapter)
 
After lunch I made the 3 1/2 hour drive to Atlanta....akak.... Hotlanta.....The Big Peach....
After checking in to my hotel located in the Buckhead neighborhood, it was time for dinner....
 

 


Community BBQ
in Decatur GA
 
 
Yes, I am having more BBQ
 

 

 
That's a good sign when the place is decorated by piggy figurines.
 

 
As well as other barnyard animals
 
 

 
And squirt bottles of bbq sauce
 
I went with the pork and rib sandwich with choice of two sides.
 
 

 
The incredibly creamy and obviously home made slaw.
 

 
The incredibly thick, smokey and flavorful brunswick stew.
 

 
 
and the out of this world bbq meal in a sandwich. The bbq was smoked so well it really didn't need any sauce. 
Not only was this the best bbq of the trip, this was truly the best meal of the trip- An amazing highlight that will find its way on the top ten list at the end of the year.
 
 
Community Q, you are my new friend...
 
After my amazing meal, I returned to my hotel, relaxed, talked to my girlfriend back home and planned my next day adventure....

much more to come...

 
#53
ann peeples
Sirloin
  • Total Posts : 8317
  • Joined: 2006/05/21 06:45:00
  • Location: West Allis, Wisconsin
  • Status: offline
Re:Whistlin' Dixie 2012/09/12 19:19:06 (permalink)
Yum! Thats all I have to say; except swiss steak as foodbeme says ,  is NOT either country fried steak, nor chicken fried steak. Thats a whole different thing.
#54
pnwchef
Double Chili Cheeseburger
  • Total Posts : 2358
  • Joined: 2011/03/16 14:15:00
  • Location: Kennewick, WA
  • Status: offline
Re:Whistlin' Dixie 2012/09/12 19:25:04 (permalink)
The bad thing about calling it Country fried steak is, most places use  the name Country fried and Chicken fried for the something. The Country Fried steak that WJ is talking about is only made in the South. Its a flat  piece of meat that's floured and fried in a skillet, then removed to a platter. They then sautee onions and pour in a beef broth, then return the meat to the skillet to cook and tenderize the meat. I bet if you ask WJ he will say the meat is fork tender. This can either be finished on the stove by simmering in a skillet, or transferred to the oven to bake for an hour. WJ does this come close ??????????
#55
carolina bob
Filet Mignon
  • Total Posts : 3420
  • Joined: 2005/01/01 23:06:00
  • Location: Chicagoland
  • Status: offline
Re:Whistlin' Dixie 2012/09/12 20:29:07 (permalink)
Great report and photos, WJ, but I'm a bit disappointed. When you said that there were monuments to "infamous" South Carolinians, I thought we were going to get to see a statue of Maurice Bessinger. 
#56
ayersian
Double Cheeseburger
  • Total Posts : 899
  • Joined: 2003/08/16 18:49:00
  • Location: Boston, MA
  • Status: offline
Re:Whistlin' Dixie 2012/09/12 22:39:11 (permalink)
carolina bob
Great report and photos, WJ, but I'm a bit disappointed. When you said that there were monuments to "infamous" South Carolinians, I thought we were going to get to see a statue of Maurice Bessinger. 

YES, Carolina Bob is back!!!  Great to read your posts again, Bob!  That Maurice Bessinger portrait is hanging in his store in downtown Columbia, I believe...  Chris
#57
Nancypalooza
Filet Mignon
  • Total Posts : 3778
  • Joined: 2004/06/17 14:39:00
  • Location: Columbia, SC
  • Status: offline
Re:Whistlin' Dixie 2012/09/12 23:05:27 (permalink)
That all-the-barbecue-at-once sandwich is blowing my mind!  How does one go about eating such a thing?  Glad you liked True BBQ!
 
I want to say the Maurice portrait, if you're talking about the one astride a white horse, is in the Irmo location on SC 6.  Thank god he doesn't have a statue.  Dale didn't even catch my unfavoritest scoundrel.  Did you catch the propagandist tenor of the fallen-Confederate . . oh never mind.  ;)
#58
Nancypalooza
Filet Mignon
  • Total Posts : 3778
  • Joined: 2004/06/17 14:39:00
  • Location: Columbia, SC
  • Status: offline
Re:Whistlin' Dixie 2012/09/12 23:06:52 (permalink)
Oh, and the 'Cola's' mural and sign are actually new.  I think the mural was goosed up from one that was there when it was a Royal Crown bottling facility.  Cola's the restaurant just opened and I've heard mixed reviews.
#59
love2bake
Double Chili Cheeseburger
  • Total Posts : 1351
  • Joined: 2008/08/10 23:03:00
  • Location: SFBay Area, CA
  • Status: offline
Re:Whistlin' Dixie 2012/09/13 01:04:44 (permalink)
pnwchef

The bad thing about calling it Country fried steak is, most places use  the name Country fried and Chicken fried for the something. The Country Fried steak that WJ is talking about is only made in the South. Its a flat  piece of meat that's floured and fried in a skillet, then removed to a platter. They then sautee onions and pour in a beef broth, then return the meat to the skillet to cook and tenderize the meat. I bet if you ask WJ he will say the meat is fork tender. This can either be finished on the stove by simmering in a skillet, or transferred to the oven to bake for an hour. WJ does this come close ??????????

I'm with pnwchef on the country-fried steak description, and I think Swiss steak is a more tomato-y type gravy, but they're both made in a similar manner:  breaded, sauteed/fried, and then braised, whether on the stove or in an oven.  Chicken-fried steak is simply made a lot like fried chicken, and it's served crunchy, with a cream gravy which is best when made from the drippings.  I think some people prefer brown gravy on their CFS instead, and in CA it is often served with sausage gravy, which is why I don't order it out here.
#60
Page: < 12345.. > >> Showing page 2 of 6
Jump to:
© 2014 APG vNext Commercial Version 5.1