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 Wok cooking

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carlton pierre

  • Total Posts: 2500
  • Joined: 7/12/2004
  • Location: Knoxville, TN
Wok cooking Fri, 03/4/05 7:48 AM (permalink)
I make a pretty mean stir-fry in my wok. I like to use either chicken or sea scallops, and serve over brown rice. Been doing that for years. But, frankly, that's about all I've ever made in the wok. Any other suggestions from some of you?
 
#1
    RubyRose

    • Total Posts: 2187
    • Joined: 5/7/2003
    • Location: Lehigh Valley, PA
    RE: Wok cooking Fri, 03/4/05 9:39 AM (permalink)
    It's probably a sacrilegious use of a wok but I like to stir-fry thinly sliced pork tenderloin with sliced onions and green cabbage, add some chicken broth, a generous sprinkle of Old Bay Seasoning and salt and serve over mashed potatoes or bowtie egg noodles.

    And I make this recipe often in the summer:

    SUMMER SKILLET SUPPER

    1 (1 lb.) fully-cooked ham slice
    2 large tomatoes
    1 clove garlic, minced
    1 medium size green pepper
    1 medium size onion
    1 medium size yellow squash (about 1/ 2 lb.)
    2 medium zucchini (about 1 lb. total)
    3 Tbs. olive oil
    1/ 2 cup chicken broth or 1 envelope instant chicken broth mixed with 1/ 2 cup water
    2 tsp.fresh chopped basil or 1/ 2 tsp. dried basil
    1/ 2 tsp salt, or to taste
    1/8 tsp. pepper

    Cut ham into 1/ 4 inch strips, about 1-1/ 2 inches long. Cut each tomato into 8 wedges; cut pepper into 1/ 2 inch wide strips and onion into thin lengthwise slivers. Cut squashes into 1/ 4 inch wide slices, halving lengthwise if larger than 1 inch in diameter.

    In wok or large skillet over medium high heat, cook ham and all vegetables, except tomatoes, in hot oil about 5 minutes, stirring frequently. Reduce heat to medium. Add remaining ingredients, except tomatoes; stir and cook until vegetables are crisp-tender, about 10 minutes. Add tomato wedges and continue cooking until tomatoes are heated through.
     
    #2
      Adjudicator

      • Total Posts: 5055
      • Joined: 5/20/2003
      • Location: Tallahassee, FL
      RE: Wok cooking Fri, 03/4/05 10:03 AM (permalink)
      Shoot, I use my wok more than I do my (cast iron) frying pans...
       
      #3
        tiki

        • Total Posts: 4135
        • Joined: 7/7/2003
        • Location: Rentiesville, OK
        RE: Wok cooking Fri, 03/4/05 10:40 AM (permalink)
        How about giving some of your favorite Chinese recipes at home---they are really not that hard---wok cookery is all about PREP!!! Once you have all your ingrediants lined up its amazingly fast ans easy to cook---i use mine all the time---it took a while but once you start to understand the whole concept of wok cooking its adictive--How to Cook and Eat in Chinese. by Buwei Yang Chao.--- this is a classic--1945---its awesome---opened my eyes to asian cookery---get this book and i guaruntee you will have PLENTY of wok ideas! My wife doest cook much at all and is VERY gratefull that i found this book---with it--and a trip to a good asian store for a few basic pantry items--we find that we can have most of our favorite chinese meals at home and that they are alot better then then your average cheap chinese buffet!

        Good luck with your wok!!!!

        BTW--woks are great for other styles of cooking too---great for soups--deep frying--like tempura!!!! use it like any saucepan and its easier to clean then most pan too'
        Also--the best tip i know of is that they really work best at very high heat!!!--esp stir fry---if you have a stove with a burner that is more powerful then the rest---use it---i have Wolf 2 burner top that has 35000 btu burners and its great--but i would LOVE to have one of those neat wok burners---they have gas jet openings at lots o diferrent angles so the rather then a hot "Ring" of flame like most western stoves, it has complete coverage of the bottom and sides of the wok---they really top end ones have a "Flash" that is often a foot control that sends a even highter burst of flame---i see oriental cooks use thia feature when the add alot of cool ingrediants to a pan so that the heat isnt diapated and it stay at a consitant temp. Would LOVE one of those!!!
         
        #4
          BT

          • Total Posts: 3589
          • Joined: 7/3/2004
          • Location: San Francisco, CA
          RE: Wok cooking Fri, 03/4/05 1:11 PM (permalink)
          quote:
          Originally posted by tiki

          the best tip i know of is that they really work best at very high heat!!!--esp stir fry---if you have a stove with a burner that is more powerful then the rest---use it---i have Wolf 2 burner top that has 35000 btu burners and its great--but i would LOVE to have one of those neat wok burners---they have gas jet openings at lots o diferrent angles so the rather then a hot "Ring" of flame like most western stoves, it has complete coverage of the bottom and sides of the wok---they really top end ones have a "Flash" that is often a foot control that sends a even highter burst of flame---i see oriental cooks use thia feature when the add alot of cool ingrediants to a pan so that the heat isnt diapated and it stay at a consitant temp. Would LOVE one of those!!!


          I have found it nearly impossible to stir-fry on an electric stove because of the inability to get the heat high enough to prevent the wok from cooling down too much when you add cold ingredients. The one solution to this I've found is to use a CAST IRON WOK. I have an inexpensive one (about $11) I bought in Macy's basement, but this line is no longer made. Still, Le Creuset makes one, I think Lodge does and there are a few other makers. But heavy cast iron retains heat so well that it does keep on frying when you add the vegies or whatever on an electric stove and I love mine.
           
          #5
            carlton pierre

            • Total Posts: 2500
            • Joined: 7/12/2004
            • Location: Knoxville, TN
            RE: Wok cooking Fri, 03/4/05 3:36 PM (permalink)
            quote:
            Originally posted by Adjudicator

            Shoot, I use my wok more than I do my (cast iron) frying pans...


            Hey man, how about a recipe or two?
             
            #6
              carlton pierre

              • Total Posts: 2500
              • Joined: 7/12/2004
              • Location: Knoxville, TN
              RE: Wok cooking Fri, 03/4/05 3:38 PM (permalink)
              Ok, I didn't realize the trick was to use high heat. In fact, I try to keep mine at medium or so, thinking that was the secret of the wok, but now I've learned something. Thanks.
               
              #7
                michaelgemmell

                • Total Posts: 673
                • Joined: 3/17/2004
                • Location: San Francisco, CA
                RE: Wok cooking Fri, 03/4/05 4:26 PM (permalink)
                In San Francisco an all-electric kitchen means there's no gas pipe in your kitchen to rupture in an earthquake, which is a good thing. It means that you will have an electric stove, which is not such a good thing. I'm interested in the cast-iron wok, BT, but I get satisfactory (word carefully chosen) results with flat-bottomed aluminum teflon woks. One of the two large elements gets hotter than the other--I use that one. I dream of a commercial gas stove in some future home, but what kind of a fool doesn't adapt to what he has now?
                 
                #8
                  tiki

                  • Total Posts: 4135
                  • Joined: 7/7/2003
                  • Location: Rentiesville, OK
                  RE: Wok cooking Fri, 03/4/05 5:54 PM (permalink)
                  quote:
                  Originally posted by BT

                  quote:
                  Originally posted by tiki

                  the best tip i know of is that they really work best at very high heat!!!--esp stir fry---if you have a stove with a burner that is more powerful then the rest---use it---i have Wolf 2 burner top that has 35000 btu burners and its great--but i would LOVE to have one of those neat wok burners---they have gas jet openings at lots o diferrent angles so the rather then a hot "Ring" of flame like most western stoves, it has complete coverage of the bottom and sides of the wok---they really top end ones have a "Flash" that is often a foot control that sends a even highter burst of flame---i see oriental cooks use thia feature when the add alot of cool ingrediants to a pan so that the heat isnt diapated and it stay at a consitant temp. Would LOVE one of those!!!


                  I have found it nearly impossible to stir-fry on an electric stove because of the inability to get the heat high enough to prevent the wok from cooling down too much when you add cold ingredients. The one solution to this I've found is to use a CAST IRON WOK. I have an inexpensive one (about $11) I bought in Macy's basement, but this line is no longer made. Still, Le Creuset makes one, I think Lodge does and there are a few other makers. But heavy cast iron retains heat so well that it does keep on frying when you add the vegies or whatever on an electric stove and I love mine.


                  I've seen them in a disply of Lodge ware and wondered about them! I cant imagine cooking never again on a electric stove---my old boss/mentor from the pards dept got one of those new electric that radiate--with the glass top---he loves it--says it gets alot hotter then the ols ones and that the temperature dail respond wuickly---no thanks---i will stick with gas---i use propane--which is alittle cooler then natural gas but i just use a higher btu rating burner to make upp for that. Alot of new stoves are coming with several different btu ratings--saw one recently with 2--15000,1-25000 and 1 35000 btu burner.15000 is fine for simmering stew--beans--what ever--but the bigger the better fro frying and stifry. so thats a nice combination.
                  With the cast iron wok---do you use a ring?
                   
                  #9
                    tiki

                    • Total Posts: 4135
                    • Joined: 7/7/2003
                    • Location: Rentiesville, OK
                    RE: Wok cooking Fri, 03/4/05 6:05 PM (permalink)
                    quote:
                    Originally posted by carlton pierre

                    Ok, I didn't realize the trick was to use high heat. In fact, I try to keep mine at medium or so, thinking that was the secret of the wok, but now I've learned something. Thanks.


                    Carlton--that and not putting in too much at a time---better to cook sveral smaller dishes then i large one---the fast the cooking in a wok the better for stir fry. Should make alot of difference for you-----let me know how it works out----and as for liquis---keep the sauce part of the mix small in qunaitiy and add liquids right at the end--and thicken with a corn starch solution---i nkeep it in a squeeze bottle and shake it up before adding it---then empty your wok---rinnse quickly under water and swish it with one of those natual bristle scrubbers that they sell in china town and then put it back on the heat to dry---just like you cast iron--then wipe it with a oiled clouth and your ready to make another dish in less then i min!

                    another hint is that mix you meats with what ever you are going to make the sauce out of---saaay a little soy--some sesme oil--crushed garlic--a bit if sugar or honey--maybe some zing--like peppers---and llet it marinate while you stir fry the vegies then add the meat at the end---since it is small and the wok is hot it cooks fast and nwhen its done so is everything else.
                     
                    #10
                      tiki

                      • Total Posts: 4135
                      • Joined: 7/7/2003
                      • Location: Rentiesville, OK
                      RE: Wok cooking Fri, 03/4/05 6:08 PM (permalink)
                      quote:
                      Originally posted by michaelgemmell

                      In San Francisco an all-electric kitchen means there's no gas pipe in your kitchen to rupture in an earthquake, which is a good thing. It means that you will have an electric stove, which is not such a good thing. I'm interested in the cast-iron wok, BT, but I get satisfactory (word carefully chosen) results with flat-bottomed aluminum teflon woks. One of the two large elements gets hotter than the other--I use that one. I dream of a commercial gas stove in some future home, but what kind of a fool doesn't adapt to what he has now?


                      Michael--have you looked into any of these new indoor usable propane burners that use the small cannisters---i have friend that has one for the same reason ---all electric apartment---and he LOVES it
                       
                      #11
                        BT

                        • Total Posts: 3589
                        • Joined: 7/3/2004
                        • Location: San Francisco, CA
                        RE: Wok cooking Fri, 03/4/05 6:11 PM (permalink)
                        quote:
                        Originally posted by michaelgemmell

                        In San Francisco an all-electric kitchen means there's no gas pipe in your kitchen to rupture in an earthquake, which is a good thing. It means that you will have an electric stove, which is not such a good thing. I'm interested in the cast-iron wok, BT, but I get satisfactory (word carefully chosen) results with flat-bottomed aluminum teflon woks. One of the two large elements gets hotter than the other--I use that one. I dream of a commercial gas stove in some future home, but what kind of a fool doesn't adapt to what he has now?


                        Living in a high rise building also forces electricity on me (apparently the building code doesn't permit gas above a certain floor--interestingly, the pool heater on the building's second floor does use gas). I've been dreaming of somebody making a commercial-style stove with an electric oven, but using propane for the cooktop from one of those small portable tanks used with outdoor BBQ's that could be built in under an adjacent counter.

                        I get barely "satisfactory" results using small quantities in a Calphalon (aluminum) stir-fry pan. But take my word for it--the cast iron works much better.
                         
                        #12
                          BT

                          • Total Posts: 3589
                          • Joined: 7/3/2004
                          • Location: San Francisco, CA
                          RE: Wok cooking Fri, 03/4/05 6:14 PM (permalink)
                          quote:
                          Originally posted by tiki


                          With the cast iron wok---do you use a ring?


                          No, the one I have has a flat bottom. Otherwise, you'd have to.
                           
                          #13
                            BT

                            • Total Posts: 3589
                            • Joined: 7/3/2004
                            • Location: San Francisco, CA
                            RE: Wok cooking Fri, 03/4/05 6:25 PM (permalink)
                            quote:
                            Originally posted by tiki

                            thicken with a corn starch solution---i nkeep it in a squeeze bottle and shake it up before adding it---then empty your wok---rinnse quickly under water and swish it with one of those natual bristle scrubbers that they sell in china town and then put it back on the heat to dry---just like you cast iron--then wipe it with a oiled clouth and your ready to make another dish in less then i min!



                            Corn starch is, of course, the thickener of choice in Chinese restaurants in the US, but I sometimes use arrowroot and find it easier to deal with since it can be added directly and doesn't clump. There's also sweet rice flour which I think may be used more in Asia.

                            Regarding cleaning the wok, I long ago abandoned my bamboo scrubber for a plastic scourer (the kind sold for non-stick cookware). Otherwise, I do it just as you say except sometimes in the dry Arizona climate (humidity can be under 15%) it isn't necessary to put the wok back over heat to dry after scrubbing and rinsing--it dries almost instantly. But I NEVER NEVER use soap on my cast iron. Some may disagree, but a good scrubbing removes any food and the high heat takes care of any germs.
                             
                            #14
                              tiki

                              • Total Posts: 4135
                              • Joined: 7/7/2003
                              • Location: Rentiesville, OK
                              RE: Wok cooking Fri, 03/4/05 6:25 PM (permalink)
                              quote:
                              Originally posted by BT

                              quote:
                              Originally posted by michaelgemmell

                              In San Francisco an all-electric kitchen means there's no gas pipe in your kitchen to rupture in an earthquake, which is a good thing. It means that you will have an electric stove, which is not such a good thing. I'm interested in the cast-iron wok, BT, but I get satisfactory (word carefully chosen) results with flat-bottomed aluminum teflon woks. One of the two large elements gets hotter than the other--I use that one. I dream of a commercial gas stove in some future home, but what kind of a fool doesn't adapt to what he has now?


                              Living in a high rise building also forces electricity on me (apparently the building code doesn't permit gas above a certain floor--interestingly, the pool heater on the building's second floor does use gas). I've been dreaming of somebody making a commercial-style stove with an electric oven, but using propane for the cooktop from one of those small portable tanks used with outdoor BBQ's that could be built in under an adjacent counter.

                              I get barely "satisfactory" results using small quantities in a Calphalon (aluminum) stir-fry pan. But take my word for it--the cast iron works much better.


                              BT---its not legal to use tose small outdodr tanks indoors---if you have a balcony you can put ot out there and run a line in to the stove though---the only propane tanks you can use indoors are those disposable ones and they not practial for every day --although like i said --i know folks that use them for wok cooking and for catering. The tanks for grills and the larger ones--like my 300 gal tank, have safety valves that in an emergency--like fire-- will blow the valve straight up--thats why you nsee them OUTSIDE camper trailers,not inside---not a good idea under you counter---besides--in a small space like that --if they do leak it will fill the space in your cabinet with gas and the smallest spark and----------well--you know.
                               
                              #15
                                BT

                                • Total Posts: 3589
                                • Joined: 7/3/2004
                                • Location: San Francisco, CA
                                RE: Wok cooking Fri, 03/4/05 6:29 PM (permalink)
                                quote:
                                Originally posted by tiki



                                Michael--have you looked into any of these new indoor usable propane burners that use the small cannisters---i have friend that has one for the same reason ---all electric apartment---and he LOVES it


                                I've had one a very long time as part of my "earthquake kit" and, indeed, I used it to complete a spaghetti sauce I was making at the time of the 1989 Loma Prieta quake (power was off for 3 days--I would have starved without the thing). But I don't find the heat they put out high enough for really good woking.
                                 
                                #16
                                  tiki

                                  • Total Posts: 4135
                                  • Joined: 7/7/2003
                                  • Location: Rentiesville, OK
                                  RE: Wok cooking Fri, 03/4/05 9:55 PM (permalink)
                                  and i agree--NEVER soap a cast irin pan---i to use plastic scrubbies on them--the ones that are made ot the material for Tutus!!--i also use a COPPER scrbber as copper is softer then cast iron and doest scratch it but will remove inaything that is burnt on.
                                   
                                  #17
                                    michaelgemmell

                                    • Total Posts: 673
                                    • Joined: 3/17/2004
                                    • Location: San Francisco, CA
                                    RE: Wok cooking Sat, 03/5/05 3:06 PM (permalink)
                                    Look how nicely our discussion on this topic continued while I went to Costco last night!

                                    I reacted with horror at the suggestion of a propane device due to trouble with propane camp stoves and my only gas bbq grill, on which the knobs melted from the heat of the unit at "medium." I don't have room in the kitchen for any more toys there, and store things in a shelf in our bedroom already. But, BT, I have taken your point about when the electricity is off to heart. There's trouble in the electical grid somewhere in this neighborhood and we lose our power at dinnertime all too frequently. Often I have trashed what might have been dinner as we go out to dinner in desperation. I am going to ask for one of those units for my birthday.

                                    Still, I find propane to be not-so-hot, so I'm most interested in the cast iron wok. When we DO have power, the stove gets mighty hot!
                                     
                                    #18
                                      BillC

                                      • Total Posts: 119
                                      • Joined: 7/13/2005
                                      • Location: Elsmere, KY
                                      RE: Wok cooking Mon, 01/9/06 8:49 PM (permalink)
                                      A couple of weeks ago, I went to the local Kohl's to return an unwanted Christmas gift (no, mom, I didn't need khaki dockers for the 3rd consecutive year. Don't do it again). I didn't want another pair of pants, so I wandered over to the cooking ware and ended up exchanging for a 14" Calphalon non-stick wok and some of those nifty bamboo cooking tools. Since I never used one before (odd because we love good Asian food), I did a search on RF and a couple of other places to pick up some hints (after making the purchase, naturally)
                                      and became a bit concerned since cast iron seemed recommended and electric heat seemed troublesome. My experience was different. I pre-heated the wok on the electric stove, threw in a couple of Tbsp. of corn oil and started cooking a nice Indonesian pork / multi-vegetable stir fry with peanut sauce. No problems with inadequate heat at all and the wok worked great. Usually I cook alone, but since this was a first time attempt, I asked Sandy to be in the kitchen in case any "oh S--T" moments happened and to keep an eye on the heated peanut sauce. Good thing to, because everything cooked quite fast and it was nice to have a third hand when removing the onion, pork and garlic from the wok and adding the numerous vegetables. Good results and I'm going to try another recipe this weekend. As mentioned in posts above, having everything sliced, diced and chopped before cooking is a necessity. If you serve rice with the meal, get the Asian sticky variety. Those nifty bamboo chop sticks that came in the tool set were absolutely worthless in picking up the Uncle Ben's I pulled out of the cupboard. Thse sticky rice tastes better with this stuff too. Cook and learn.
                                       
                                      #19
                                        zataar

                                        • Total Posts: 1440
                                        • Joined: 4/5/2004
                                        • Location: kansas city, MO
                                        RE: Wok cooking Mon, 01/9/06 9:29 PM (permalink)
                                        The Breath of a Wok, by Grace Young is a wonderful book of wok culture, lore and recipes.

                                        http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0743238273/qid=1136859895/sr=2-1/ref=pd_bbs_b_2_1/102-4020715-0068104?s=books&v=glance&n=283155
                                         
                                        #20
                                          BillC

                                          • Total Posts: 119
                                          • Joined: 7/13/2005
                                          • Location: Elsmere, KY
                                          RE: Wok cooking Thu, 01/12/06 11:15 PM (permalink)
                                          quote:
                                          Originally posted by zataar

                                          The Breath of a Wok, by Grace Young is a wonderful book of wok culture, lore and recipes.

                                          http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0743238273/qid=1136859895/sr=2-1/ref=pd_bbs_b_2_1/102-4020715-0068104?s=books&v=glance&n=283155

                                          Thank you for the tip. I'll check it out. There's a lot to be learned with this. Can't believe I waited so long.
                                           
                                          #21
                                            BT

                                            • Total Posts: 3589
                                            • Joined: 7/3/2004
                                            • Location: San Francisco, CA
                                            RE: Wok cooking Fri, 01/13/06 3:14 AM (permalink)
                                            quote:
                                            Originally posted by BillC

                                            became a bit concerned since cast iron seemed recommended and electric heat seemed troublesome. My experience was different. I pre-heated the wok on the electric stove, threw in a couple of Tbsp. of corn oil and started cooking a nice Indonesian pork / multi-vegetable stir fry with peanut sauce. No problems with inadequate heat at all and the wok worked great. Usually I cook alone, but since this was a first time attempt, I asked Sandy to be in the kitchen in case any "oh S--T" moments happened and to keep an eye on the heated peanut sauce. Good thing to, because everything cooked quite fast and it was nice to have a third hand when removing the onion, pork and garlic from the wok and adding the numerous vegetables. Good results and I'm going to try another recipe this weekend. As mentioned in posts above, having everything sliced, diced and chopped before cooking is a necessity. If you serve rice with the meal, get the Asian sticky variety. Those nifty bamboo chop sticks that came in the tool set were absolutely worthless in picking up the Uncle Ben's I pulled out of the cupboard. Thse sticky rice tastes better with this stuff too. Cook and learn.


                                            The issue with cast iron has to do with the fact that it acts as a heat "sink" better than other materials. That means it takes quite a while to heat up (while absorbing all that heat energy) but once hot, it stays hot like nothing else. If a wok made of something else works for you, that's great but for a long time I used an expensive Calphalon "stir-fry pan" and found that too often it would lose enough heat as I added ingredients that I was no longer stir-frying but rather doing a modest saute. That doesn't happen with cast iron. If you go to a Chinese place with an open kitchen, you will see that they accomplish the task with a flame that looks like it came straight from Hell which is, in fact, needed because the traditional steel wok they use will stay hot only when massive heat is continuously applied.

                                            You say you used corn oil. That'll work well, but most Asian cooks prefer peanut oil and my favorite brand is Lion and Globe:



                                            If you can't get a good Asian brand like this, you are probably right to stick with corn oil because American peanut oils I've tried are inferior.

                                            Finally, regarding rice, I would NEVER, NEVER use a "converted" (i.e. parboiled) rice like Uncle Ben's with Asian food (though I use it all the time with Southern and creole dishes). For Chinese stir fries, I use plain long-grain rice but for Thai food the traditional rice is so-called "Jasmine" rice, for Indian curries it's basmati, for Japanese food I usually get a medium-grain rice like Calrose. All these are available in grocery stores like Safeway where I live and probably elsewhere, and, believe it or not, I keep them all in my pantry most of the time.
                                             
                                            #22
                                              BillC

                                              • Total Posts: 119
                                              • Joined: 7/13/2005
                                              • Location: Elsmere, KY
                                              RE: Wok cooking Fri, 01/13/06 7:54 PM (permalink)
                                              BT - Thanks for the recommendations. The oil thing is interesting. I got the recipe out of a stir fry cookbook that was on sale at Barnes and Noble for 6 bucks. The conciseness, clarity and apparent quality of the recipes were better than the rest of the stir fry books they had, so I bought it. Depending on the recipe, the oil recommendations can be corn, peanut, or vegetable. For example, this weekend, I'm going to do a sesame beef that calls for vegetable and a salt and pepper shrimp that calls for peanut. Unfortunately, the book doesn't give any idea as to why they recommend different oils. Obtaining the proper rice won't be any problem, but I probably won't find any Lion and Globe(or something similar)until the next trip too Jungle Jim's.
                                               
                                              #23
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