Wolfgang Puck and Fois Gras

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BunglingBill
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RE: Wolfgang Puck and Fois Gras 2007/04/02 13:50:31 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by twinwillow

Referring to my above post, what I really mean't to say was, what we say, really doesn't have very much influence it seems on how farmers, etc. raise and feed their stocks.
The "old world" practises of "farming" will not change very quickly in some parts of the world.
We can scream against whaling, but it still takes place.



You are most definitely correct, twinwillow, it (whaling) unfortunately STILL takes place.

But "screaming" . . . or at least expressing dissatisfaction with certain practices . . . is a start.

In today's world of instant and "saturated" information exchange, knowledge is a VERY powerful tool.

When people have information, especially information that can be verified, they WILL use that information to effect positive change, I believe.

There are a lot of changes needed in the stewardship of the planet, of its environment, of it's natural resources, AND of animal husbandry.

Count me among those who do not much care for politicians, for thought police, NOR for "food" police. But then, I ALSO don't much care for people who refuse to debate controversial issues rationally.

Of course, that's just my HUMBLE opinion . . . and like NOSES . . . almost everyone has one!

#31
V960
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RE: Wolfgang Puck and Fois Gras 2007/04/03 10:22:15 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by EliseT

Are we really at the top of the food chain? We don't eat lions and tigers.


I have eaten the smaller feline...cats...roof rabbits...although I didn't order it was served. Not bad but I now understand why during the depression dressed rabbits were sold w/ their heads on to assure the buyer they were getting a rabbit and not a cat. Chili sauce and over rice they're better than just rice.
#32
V960
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RE: Wolfgang Puck and Fois Gras 2007/04/03 10:48:32 (permalink)
The whole foie gras thing is comical. I think there are three or four farms in America producing foie gras (I only know of two, I produce my own because I can) yet laws are passed in Chicago, Wolfgang Puck gets on his soapbox and Charlie Trotter bans it from his menu.

Want to see real horror for animals? Visit a confinement swine farm, a battery hen house or a puppy farm. The eggs you ate this morning and the bacon beside them was raised in terrible conditions (in general). My breakfast was not because we raise our own, not to spare animals pain but to have control over the inputs. I raise my animals in as humane a way as I can but that is because I think that produces a better product.

Male cattle are emasculated and implanted w/ a growth hormone pellet to increase muscle growth. Finished on grain (America is basically the ONLY country that does that), a practice that causes great distress to the steers is almost never talked about.

So we pass laws about duck livers? Force feed me any day before we start cutting off the boon boons. I've done it to horses, cattle, pigs and chickens and w/ the exception of chickens I can see no reason for it. Do it to a chicken and he becomes a capon...fine eating later down the road.

#33
Fieldthistle
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RE: Wolfgang Puck and Fois Gras 2007/04/03 12:56:08 (permalink)
Hello All,
I've never had foie gras, but that's because I was never offered it.
When I was growing up, we raised cows, pigs, and chicken for our own use, and
they were in a small groups...3 cows at a time, a couple dozens chickens,
and 3 pigs. That was our max. So we didn't have the stress of making a profit.
We just wanted good, healthy food, and it was against our nature to create harm
to any creature in our care. But we weren't a business.
I admire V960. He is always honest and shares his knowledge. Thank you, V960.
I have at times changed my diet to become a veggie soul, but ultimately, I need
meat at my stage of life. My father, as his health changed and he aged, found
that meat harmed his body. I may find that path myself, but not now.
But it would be wonderful if we could honour the animals that we consume
with the spirit of the Native Americans, or Indians, whatever you like to label
our native brothers and sisters. We do use every part of their bodies, but
we don't recognize the value of their souls and sacrifice. I know that sounds stupid.
Another stupid thing I do, and have taught my daughter to do, is before I eat
is to say a silent prayer in which I thank God for the food I am to eat, to thank
the source of the food(whether meat or veggie or fruit) for their gift to me, ask
a blessing for the cook of my food, and also thank God for the money that allowed me
to buy the food. In a restaurant, I will also thank God for the servers of food,(as well
as give a good tip.)
This may sound stupid and off the topic, but really we should be grateful for all we eat,
and should be respectful of how every aspect of the food we consume is attained, prepared,
served, and of how we recieve it into our bodies and souls. That way we can eat with whatever
perspective we hold.
I wish to judge no one, and wish no one to judge me.
Take Care,
Fieldthistle
#34
Twinwillow
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RE: Wolfgang Puck and Fois Gras 2007/04/03 17:28:27 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by Fieldthistle

Hello All,
I've never had foie gras, but that's because I was never offered it.
When I was growing up, we raised cows, pigs, and chicken for our own use, and
they were in a small groups...3 cows at a time, a couple dozens chickens,
and 3 pigs. That was our max. So we didn't have the stress of making a profit.
We just wanted good, healthy food, and it was against our nature to create harm
to any creature in our care. But we weren't a business.
I admire V960. He is always honest and shares his knowledge. Thank you, V960.
I have at times changed my diet to become a veggie soul, but ultimately, I need
meat at my stage of life. My father, as his health changed and he aged, found
that meat harmed his body. I may find that path myself, but not now.
But it would be wonderful if we could honour the animals that we consume
with the spirit of the Native Americans, or Indians, whatever you like to label
our native brothers and sisters. We do use every part of their bodies, but
we don't recognize the value of their souls and sacrifice. I know that sounds stupid.
Another stupid thing I do, and have taught my daughter to do, is before I eat
is to say a silent prayer in which I thank God for the food I am to eat, to thank
the source of the food(whether meat or veggie or fruit) for their gift to me, ask
a blessing for the cook of my food, and also thank God for the money that allowed me
to buy the food. In a restaurant, I will also thank God for the servers of food,(as well
as give a good tip.)
This may sound stupid and off the topic, but really we should be grateful for all we eat,
and should be respectful of how every aspect of the food we consume is attained, prepared,
served, and of how we recieve it into our bodies and souls. That way we can eat with whatever
perspective we hold.
I wish to judge no one, and wish no one to judge me.
Take Care,
Fieldthistle



Fieldthistle, Your beautifully expressed post was NOT stupid.
It was, actually, one of the most heartfelt, intelligently written posts I've ever read here.
Thank you for your thoughts.
#35
V960
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RE: Wolfgang Puck and Fois Gras 2007/04/04 10:17:37 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by Fieldthistle

Hello All,
I've never had foie gras, but that's because I was never offered it.
When I was growing up, we raised cows, pigs, and chicken for our own use, and
they were in a small groups...3 cows at a time, a couple dozens chickens,
and 3 pigs. That was our max. So we didn't have the stress of making a profit.
We just wanted good, healthy food, and it was against our nature to create harm
to any creature in our care. But we weren't a business.
I admire V960. He is always honest and shares his knowledge. Thank you, V960.
I have at times changed my diet to become a veggie soul, but ultimately, I need
meat at my stage of life. My father, as his health changed and he aged, found
that meat harmed his body. I may find that path myself, but not now.
But it would be wonderful if we could honour the animals that we consume
with the spirit of the Native Americans, or Indians, whatever you like to label
our native brothers and sisters. We do use every part of their bodies, but
we don't recognize the value of their souls and sacrifice. I know that sounds stupid.
Another stupid thing I do, and have taught my daughter to do, is before I eat
is to say a silent prayer in which I thank God for the food I am to eat, to thank
the source of the food(whether meat or veggie or fruit) for their gift to me, ask
a blessing for the cook of my food, and also thank God for the money that allowed me
to buy the food. In a restaurant, I will also thank God for the servers of food,(as well
as give a good tip.)
This may sound stupid and off the topic, but really we should be grateful for all we eat,
and should be respectful of how every aspect of the food we consume is attained, prepared,
served, and of how we recieve it into our bodies and souls. That way we can eat with whatever
perspective we hold.
I wish to judge no one, and wish no one to judge me.
Take Care,
Fieldthistle



I appreciate your kind comments. Let me recommend you DO NOT try foie gras for the first time out of a can. Pan seared fresh foie gras is wonderful. Only other liver I will eat is Monkfish liver done in the Japanese style called Aki Mono.

We are a small hobby farm and gave up a few years ago (except for asparagus) on any commercial goals. Your comments about Native Americans was interesting. We say the Lord's Prayer over each animal we kill or harvest. Granted I say only one prayer over a bag of doves after a day of hunting...but same idea.

My Mother had enough Cherokee blood in her to live on the reservation of the Eastern Tribe of the Cherokees. Interesting item of no particular interest is that many families hid their heritage for many years and now want it back due to the gambling money coming to the tribes.

In tribute to this thread I have a pound of foie gras in the frig slowly defrosting to go into a nice terrine w/ white grapes.
#36
lleechef
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RE: Wolfgang Puck and Fois Gras 2007/04/05 11:25:58 (permalink)
Lovely posts V960 and Fieldthistle. The Native Americans in Alaska utilize every inch of the animals they kill....fur for garments in the cold, skins for boats (the women soften the skins by chewing them), the meat for food. Their Native art reflects their respect for the animal and it's soul and it's place in their lives and they are thankful. I agree that we should all be thankful.

Now about that POUND of foie gras, I am JEALOUS!! Enjoy that terrine!
#37
V960
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RE: Wolfgang Puck and Fois Gras 2007/04/05 16:16:33 (permalink)
I use a rough modification of Andre Soltner's recipe from his book The Lutece Cookbook for the terrine. I don't like the milk in it or the duck fat. I use heavy cream (if the liver won't kill you might as well die smiling) and olive oil. Not a flavorful extra virgin but a bland EVOO (shades of Rachel Ray, I used that term).

This stuff is so rich only small portions can be served or the chickens dine well that night. My daughter's birthday, my wife's birthday and my anniversary all happen in the next week or so.

To change subjects...our two little pigglets arrived today. "Pork chop" and "Bacon" are this year's names. Cute little girls...can't wait to put them in the freezer in November.
#38
BunglingBill
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RE: Wolfgang Puck and Fois Gras 2007/04/05 16:32:24 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by lleechef

Lovely posts V960 and Fieldthistle. The Native Americans in Alaska utilize every inch of the animals they kill....fur for garments in the cold, skins for boats (the women soften the skins by chewing them), the meat for food. Their Native art reflects their respect for the animal and it's soul and it's place in their lives and they are thankful. I agree that we should all be thankful.

Now about that POUND of foie gras, I am JEALOUS!! Enjoy that terrine!


Are you SURE about that, chef, that the "women soften the skins by chewing them"?

I mean, we visit Anchorage, Fairbanks and Seward frequently (like once a year), and I have never seen any women chewing on animal skins.

That was a method used many decades ago, but I don't think that the "chewing method" is being used today.

Of course, I could be wrong, because my hired guide and I could not possibly visit EVERY nook and cranny in the far-flung Alaskan villages.

But you know what . . . I NEVER encountered Foie Gras in Alaska. If I had, we would have checked it out!

My wife and I will be touring Anchorage again in August (our reservations are at the Marriot). WE would really like to visit one of your restaurants and enjoy some local foie gras.

Could you please provide us with the names of your restaurants so that we may sample your menu(s).

Thanks in advance!
#39
lleechef
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RE: Wolfgang Puck and Fois Gras 2007/04/05 23:55:44 (permalink)
BB........I assure you that the Native women DO chew the skins of seals to soften them to make the boats that the men take out to harpoon whales. OF COURSE THIS IS NOT HAPPENING IN ANCHORAGE which is a pretty urban area. We are talking The Bush. Villages like Barrow, Kaktovik, Shishmaref, Savoonga and many others depend on a subsistance lifestyle. The "chewing method" is used in villages along the Arctic Ocean and the Bering Sea.

Last restaurant I worked at was Kincaid Grill. www.kincaidgrill.com We were able to obtain domestic foie gras from Alaska Game and Gourmet. I've been gone since August to be a snowbird in SoCal, he changes the menu often so I don't know if it's on there now or not. Another two restaurants that often serve foie gras is Jen's and South Side Bistro.

Happy travels to Anchorage! We have had many Roadfood friends visit us and they all loved their Alaskan experience!

#40
BunglingBill
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RE: Wolfgang Puck and Fois Gras 2007/04/06 08:31:07 (permalink)
Thanks, lleechef, for the info.

We have been to Alaska several times in the last few years and never failed to enjoy our trip or to see something new. Also have had some fabulous seafood in Anchorage.

Only had ONE bad experience and that was at a Tesoro (did I get that right??) gas station. I guess I lost my credit card there and someone found it and ran up a bunch of charges . . . but, of course that can happen ANYWHERE!

Whatever, in many ways you are lucky to live in such a beautiful place. If I could take the winters, I might join you guys
#41
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