Helpful ReplyHot!Yesteryear's beers

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waltpiii
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Re:Yesteryear's beers 2014/08/12 13:45:17 (permalink)
I actually met Jenny the promotional girl for Genesee beer at the St.Jude's Horse Show in the early 1960's.  She would be driven around the show ring in a white carriage.
 
Utica Club had talking mugs, Shultz and Dooly.
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jerzeydawg
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Re:Yesteryear's beers 2014/08/16 13:55:22 (permalink)
Many of the American National beer companies made dark beers. Mostly in early spring. They were called Bock Beer. I know that Schlitz , Genesee, and , Shaefer brewed  Bock beer.
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beerluvr2
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Re: Yesteryear's beers 2014/08/16 14:15:28 (permalink)
First brewed in 1878, America’s Original IPA returns in style to select markets

Los Angeles, CA (August 13, 2014) – , the largest American-owned brewery with over 30 beers in its portfolio, today announced the re-launch of Ballantine India Pale Ale, one of the oldest and most iconic craft beers in the country. The beer will be available beginning in September in major Northeast markets.

First brewed in 1878 by P. Ballantine & Sons Brewing Company in Newark, NJ, Ballantine India Pale Ale was the only American-made beer that successfully continued the tradition of the 19th century IPAs once Prohibition ended. This was due in large part to the brewery’s steadfast commitment to “Purity, Body, and Flavor”— as exemplified by the three interlocking Borromean rings found on every bottle.

Ballantine’s brewers were meticulous about ensuring that the beer’s gravity, alcohol content, IBUs, and hopping rates remained consistent well into the mid-20th century. Another unique method that characterized BallantineIndia Pale Ale was a hopping process in which the distilled oils from a hop-and-water mixture were added to the brew, giving the beer an intense hoppy flavor that was quite distinct from its competition. P. Ballantine & Sons was also rumored to have matured the India Pale Ale in huge wooden vats for up to a year in order to help develop the ale’s original flavor.

In order to replicate the original recipe as closely as possible, Pabst Master Brewer Gregory Deuhs reverse-engineered the beer, ensuring the robust heritage and quality of the 136-year-old brew was properly reflected in the 21st century version.

“I began this project with a simple question: How would Peter Ballantine make his beer today?” said Master Brewer Deuhs, adding, “There wasn’t a ‘secret formula’ in anyone’s basement we could copy, so I conducted extensive research looking for any and all mentions of Ballantine India Pale Ale, from the ale’s processing parameters, aroma and color, alcohol and bitterness specifications. Many brewers and craft beer drinkers would be impressed that the Ballantine India Pale Ale of the 1950s and ‘60s would rival any craft IPA brewed today.”

Over the course of two years and over two dozen iterations of five-gallon batches handmade at his home near Milwaukee, WI, Deuhs finally struck gold.

“Unlike recreating a lost brew from long ago, I had the advantage of actually being able to speak with people who drank Ballantine back in the day,” continued Deuhs. “Their feedback was crucial to ensuring that the hoppy, complex flavor that was revered for over a hundred years was front and center in my recipe.”

Ballantine IPA will be sold in bottled six-packs and limited-edition 750 ml bottles in major markets across the Northeast, including New York, New Jersey, Boston, Portland, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington D.C. and Pittsburgh.

Ballantine Background
  • Dry hopping and the addition of hop oil has long been credited as the key to the beer’s unique profile. In addition, a proprietary brewing method ensures that every drop of Ballantine India Pale Ale comes in contact with American Oak, effectively capturing the robust flavor and heritage of the brand. With the reintroduction, an entirely new generation of craft beer enthusiasts will experience what made America’s Original IPA so exceptional.
  • In the 1950s, Ballantine was the third largest brewery in the country, going on to become the primary broadcast sponsor for the New York Yankees. Despite stiff competition, the IPA continued to flourish as its dry hopping process gave the beer an intense, distinct hop presence, unlike anything else available in the United States at that time.
  • In the 1970s, taste preferences changed and American lagers edged out the IPA, a trend that was abruptly reversed with the craft beer movement of the past few years. This increased interest in craft beer gave Pabst the perfect opportunity to bring back America’s Original IPA.

About Pabst Brewing Company
In business since 1844, the Pabst Brewing Company is North America’s largest privately held brewing company. Pabst’s portfolio includes iconic brands with deep ties to America’s heritage such as Ballantine, Pabst Blue Ribbon, Schlitz, Colt 45, Old Style, Lone Star, Stroh’s, Old Milwaukee and Rainier.

Pabst’s decision to re-launch Ballantine IPA after more than 30 years reflects the company’s recent move into the craft beer market where the company will maintain Peter Ballantine’s commitment to Purity, Body and Flavor. For more information, visit.
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ConeyIslandLou
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Re:Yesteryear's beers 2014/08/16 18:57:28 (permalink)
I believe Genny still does - its listed on their website yet
jerzeydawg
Many of the American National beer companies made dark beers. Mostly in early spring. They were called Bock Beer. I know that Schlitz , Genesee, and , Shaefer brewed  Bock beer.




#94
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Re:Yesteryear's beers 2014/09/05 17:09:52 (permalink)
Prior's Double Dark.
 
 
#95
tmiles
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Re:Yesteryear's beers 2014/09/13 15:12:52 (permalink)
An ad on TV last night said that Sam Adams ALONE makes 60 kinds of beer now. In my day many folks were loyal to one beer, but today they want to try something "new". My beer guy who manages the smallish beer and wine corner at my local supermarket, says that there are literally hundreds of kinds in local distribution. He doesn't have room, so he depends on the wholesalers to tell him what is "hot" (I like MY beer cold, LOL)
 
As far as old brands go, Narragannset has been back for a few years. It will never have it's old market share of 70 pct in the local area when Bud was at 5 or 6.
 
Admen (and women) love the story of "nastyransit". The best in the industry market share was based on super heavy promotion, mostly sports based advertising. They didn't make much money, though, and were eventually sold to a guy who figured he could cut promotion to zero for a few years, and not lose too much share, while making a ton of money. Without the ads, sales dropped like a rock, and they were out of biz in a few years.
 
The "new" Narragannsett is made in a contract brewery, and has decent shelf space in stores, as well as lots of low cost promotions with bars. They say to buy the beer and help to build a brewery. I wish them well.
 
I learned this from an interesting guest on the Howie Carr radio show.
post edited by tmiles - 2014/09/13 18:54:46
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ScreamingChicken
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Re:Yesteryear's beers 2014/09/15 10:47:26 (permalink)
Sounds like the guest might've been referring to Paul Kalmanovitz.
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hannah97
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Re:Yesteryear's beers 2014/09/15 15:15:33 (permalink)
I hate to admit it but I puked off the side of a boat at 20 in Wisconsin after drinking 3 Mickey's Malt liquors with the wide mouth. A Heilaman product in the early 80's. Tainted me for years.
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CCJPO
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Re:Yesteryear's beers 2014/09/15 17:52:32 (permalink)
Probably the Mickey's Big Mouth weren't cold enough.
 
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Phildelmar
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Re:Yesteryear's beers 2014/09/15 18:01:29 (permalink)
Not sure that would have made a difference
CCJPO
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Re:Yesteryear's beers 2014/09/15 18:22:43 (permalink)
As bad as it sounds I treat myself to Mickey's Big Mouths during the summer. I guess it is a product of a very misspent youth, but I also still enjoy Pabst and Genny Cream Ale. Iced cold after a hot day outside, almost better than ice water and/or plain iced tea.
tmiles
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Re:Yesteryear's beers 2014/09/15 19:35:55 (permalink)
I remember a beer in college (class of 72) that was the last one available at a dollar per 6 pak. It was made , as I recall, in New Jersey, and if poured in a glass, you saw stuff floating around in it. I didn't drink it. No beer at all was better that that stuff. Friends drank a lot of it, though. It was not beer, but another (IMO) undrinkable product was Boons Farm apple wine.
wmceaton
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Re:Yesteryear's beers 2014/09/16 07:53:56 (permalink)
I remember that Falstaff had a widely distributed "house dark" that I thought was great...it was only available on tap. I'm not sure if this was an east coast thing only, but I doubt it. I used to have this at The Silver Lounge in North Falmouth, MA.
 
Beers that I remember growing up in the 60s-70s in Boston: 
Schaefer, Tuborg, Schlitz, Genny Cream, Black Label and Ballantine (their new IPA is great BTW).
 
Still love the distinct flavor of Schaefer & Ballantine.
post edited by wmceaton - 2014/09/16 08:06:10
Phildelmar
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Re:Yesteryear's beers 2014/09/16 08:07:14 (permalink)
Agree about Ballantine, but it seems to be in short supply in Delaware
eruby
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Re:Yesteryear's beers 2014/09/16 09:28:39 (permalink)
CCJPO
As bad as it sounds I treat myself to Mickey's Big Mouths during the summer. I guess it is a product of a very misspent youth, but I also still enjoy Pabst and Genny Cream Ale. Iced cold after a hot day outside, almost better than ice water and/or plain iced tea.

I don't think I ever opened a Mickey's without getting at least a small cut. 


tmiles
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Re:Yesteryear's beers 2014/10/13 17:02:15 (permalink)
wmceaton
I remember that Falstaff had a widely distributed "house dark" that I thought was great...it was only available on tap. I'm not sure if this was an east coast thing only, but I doubt it. I used to have this at The Silver Lounge in North Falmouth, MA.
 
Beers that I remember growing up in the 60s-70s in Boston: 
Schaefer, Tuborg, Schlitz, Genny Cream, Black Label and Ballantine (their new IPA is great BTW).
 
Still love the distinct flavor of Schaefer & Ballantine.


All of those great old brands got bought out only to die (I don't think anyone has mentioned Olympic). Now so many independents are setting up, and I'm not surprised to see some of them getting some mention by re-starting an old established brand. In this state it is cheap and easy to set up as a "farm" brewery, and the term "farm" has been really streeeeeeeeched. I don't remember the exact size that you can be, but it is basicly enough to be a brew pub. Growing to a full commercial brewery is very expensive, and beyond the means of most "farm" brewers. Farm brewers in this state are looking to the legislature for the law to allow something in between, so that farm brewers can graduate to selling 12 oz bottles via package stores, starting on a smaller scale. A year or so ago a farm brewer was telling me about several old brands that he could buy, if he could only find the cash to grow. If I recall his total beer sales were only about $100k, and he was looking to raise a million. I did not invest.
Sonny Funzio
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Re:Yesteryear's beers 2014/10/23 19:59:35 (permalink)
Goebel
(ahem ... after a few delicious Goebel beers pronounced "joe-bell")
and Brewster the Goebel Rooster

iceomat
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Re:Yesteryear's beers 2014/10/25 00:11:34 (permalink)
Back in my college days in Stillwater, OK, I remember drinking a lot of Brown Derby (in the stubby brown bottles) because it was so cheap. Homeland was buying out the Safeway stores in OK and I guess they were just trying to get rid of the stuff. I also remember drinking some horrible tasting beer like Blatz and Hudy Gold.
post edited by iceomat - 2014/10/25 00:12:37
ScreamingChicken
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Re:Yesteryear's beers 2014/10/25 12:55:15 (permalink)
Was Hudy (Hudepohl) Gold a light beer like Olympia Gold?
iceomat
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Re:Yesteryear's beers 2014/10/25 14:43:27 (permalink)
ScreamingChicken
Was Hudy (Hudepohl) Gold a light beer like Olympia Gold?


I think it was their "premium" beer while Hudy Delight was the light beer.
ScreamingChicken
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Re:Yesteryear's beers 2014/10/25 16:15:53 (permalink)
iceomat
I remember drinking a lot of Brown Derby (in the stubby brown bottles)
Speaking of "stubbies", around here Coors has been sold in those bottles (the carrier is marked "Commemorative 1936 Bottles") for awhile now.  Is this a nationwide thing?  There are other beers I'd rather drink but occasionally I'll buy a sixer for the nostalgia factor.  Not for 1936, mind you, but for the '70s and early '80s when Old Style and other G. Heileman products came in stubbies.
tmiles
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Re:Yesteryear's beers 2014/10/25 18:11:27 (permalink)
ScreamingChicken
iceomat
I remember drinking a lot of Brown Derby (in the stubby brown bottles)
Speaking of "stubbies", around here Coors has been sold in those bottles (the carrier is marked "Commemorative 1936 Bottles") for awhile now.  Is this a nationwide thing?  There are other beers I'd rather drink but occasionally I'll buy a sixer for the nostalgia factor.  Not for 1936, mind you, but for the '70s and early '80s when Old Style and other G. Heileman products came in stubbies.


The Coors stubbies were here over the summer, but I don't recall seeing them recently......but I have not really looked.
zippypinhead
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Re:Yesteryear's beers 2014/10/26 16:22:04 (permalink)
tmiles
ScreamingChicken
iceomat
I remember drinking a lot of Brown Derby (in the stubby brown bottles)
Speaking of "stubbies", around here Coors has been sold in those bottles (the carrier is marked "Commemorative 1936 Bottles") for awhile now.  Is this a nationwide thing?  There are other beers I'd rather drink but occasionally I'll buy a sixer for the nostalgia factor.  Not for 1936, mind you, but for the '70s and early '80s when Old Style and other G. Heileman products came in stubbies.


The Coors stubbies were here over the summer, but I don't recall seeing them recently......but I have not really looked.


Still being produced. (I designed the parts for the filling/crowning machine to run it.)
iceomat
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Re:Yesteryear's beers 2014/10/26 17:42:55 (permalink)
Yeah they still have the Coors stubbys at Wal-Mart here.
 
IndianaPete
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Re:Yesteryear's beers 2014/10/28 11:55:57 (permalink)
Pretty old thread, wish I had seen it earlier.
I used to get a pitcher of dark beer at Shakey's in Indy in the early 70s for 3 bucks.  My guess is Lowenbrau Dark.
Yes the huge bottles, they were 1/2 gallon, were Meister Brau.
I once stopped in Ladysmith, WI in the early 70s and got a case of bottles of Master Brew for $2.58, including the 60¢ deposit.  That's a case of beer for a buck 98.  Hayward, WI is where I discovered Leinenkugel's, Olympia I think, and Special Export.
A coworker stopped in at a local microbrewery and asked for a Coors Light.  He was told, "we don't serve dishwater here."
My grandfather used to spend his Saturdays in Chicago in the basement with a couple quarts of Drewry's in ice cold water in a cast iron sink.  He put a rubber band around the labels to hold them on since he'd lose his deposit if the labels slipped off.
Sonny Funzio
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Re:Yesteryear's beers 2014/10/29 11:14:04 (permalink)
Around 1980 or so from the same people who brought you Little Kings cream ale was Schoenling's Big Jug beer .  .99cents for 64 ounces.  That's even cheaper per ounce than a $7 case of beer like Falstaff or Top Hat.  Revolutionary.

post edited by Sonny Funzio - 2014/10/29 11:31:19
Davydd
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Re:Yesteryear's beers 2014/10/29 21:25:11 (permalink)
The Big Jug at 64 ounces is the size (in ounces) of the standard growler that craft beer brewery tap rooms use. You pay a lot more than 99 cents now.
zippypinhead
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Re:Yesteryear's beers 2014/10/31 10:40:17 (permalink)
Sonny Funzio
Around 1980 or so from the same people who brought you Little Kings cream ale was Schoenling's Big Jug beer .  .99cents for 64 ounces.  That's even cheaper per ounce than a $7 case of beer like Falstaff or Top Hat.  Revolutionary.



And they had promotional T-shirts with two of the bottles shown and the tag line of, "Two of the biggest jugs in town!" " />
tmiles
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Re:Yesteryear's beers 2014/10/31 16:18:21 (permalink)
zippypinhead said: 


...............Still being produced. (I designed the parts for the filling/crowning machine to run it.)


When I had Angus cattle in the 70s and 80s I recall meeting a gentleman who besides having Angus designed can making machines for beer and soda. He is the guy who figured out how to "neck down" the top of the can, making it cheaper to produce. I wish that I could remember his name.(I'll bet that you know who he was) He had one of the best pure bred herds in the country, but he was always friendly to me with my average 5 or 6 cows. Cow folks are very friendly to each other. My uncle got to be friendly with the queen of England thanks to a common interest in Scotch Highland cattle..........and they would have never met otherwise. 
post edited by tmiles - 2014/10/31 16:20:32
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