French fries: Are homemade fries worth effort?

Post
blizzardstormus
Cheeseburger
2005/11/09 16:41:00
In my restaurant, most of my food is made on premises, but, I fear making my own fries due to 2 concerns: 1) most recipes I have encountered call for a substantial time factor to make a good homemade fry - & 2)homemade fries are great to eat at the restaurant but suck for TO GO orders.
I currently use a Stealth Fry from Sysco- very pricey, but, very good. Any suggestions for making my own fries?
Sundancer7
Fire Safety Admin
RE: French fries: Are homemade fries worth effort? 2005/11/09 16:46:08
Can you cut them the evening before and store them in water overnight?
Use a five gallon container and fill it with water.

Nothing taste like a real potato.

I would think that they would be pretty cheap buying them in bulk and running them through a slicer.

I personally like them with the peel on.

Paul E. Smith
Knoxville, TN
Theedge
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: French fries: Are homemade fries worth effort? 2005/11/09 17:07:36
Fresh cut are the best. At home I rinse mine and then let them sit in ice water before frying. I think this is the best way to go, but if your client is expecting a “fast food style” fry they might not be very happy. Why not keep doing what you’re doing, but hand out some free samples of fresh cut and ask your customers what they think?
V960
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: French fries: Are homemade fries worth effort? 2005/11/09 17:16:25
To have a trueely great "pomme fritte" you have to cut them, wash them, dry them, fry @ 325 and then again at 375. Worth the trouble? Ask a Frenchie or Belgiquie (sp).
chicagostyledog
Filet Mignon
RE: French fries: Are homemade fries worth effort? 2005/11/09 17:36:54
The best fries I ever ate were in Amsterdam. Here's the secret recipe:
http://www.belgianfries.com/index.cfm?Module=recept1
For the best taste, fry in duck or goose fat(very expensive)or lard(beef tallow). The oil is the most important factor determining taste.
Sundancer7
Fire Safety Admin
RE: French fries: Are homemade fries worth effort? 2005/11/09 17:40:51
Chicago. Thanks for the link.

Paul E. smith
Knoxville, TN
V960
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: French fries: Are homemade fries worth effort? 2005/11/09 17:45:21
My directions are as detailed as I get. Basically the same and mine was from memory...a dangerous thing for me.
EdSails
Filet Mignon
RE: French fries: Are homemade fries worth effort? 2005/11/09 18:03:04
Check out how In-n-Out Burger does theirs. They cut them fresh----and they go through a ton of them!
-Tricky-
Cheeseburger
RE: French fries: Are homemade fries worth effort? 2005/11/09 19:37:52
blizzard, I honestly think they're worth it. Even if you just buy one of those manual slicers and slice them and fry them, they're better than any frozen product you can buy and pretty darn cheap. I never order fries a second time if they're not "real".
Burgerman1
Hamburger
RE: French fries: Are homemade fries worth effort? 2005/11/09 20:13:57
blizzard....here's my .02 worth!

Hell yeah they are a lot better...some tweaking of the type of potato, type of oil, receipe, and size and I'll guarantee you'll have a winner.

The bad part, we have trained the customers to the frozen stuff, that's what they expect, but is that really a bad thing? Look at it this way, by using real potatoes and cutting them you'll have a product that is GOOD, most of your competitors won't...you'll have a USP!!

Howard
bassrocker4u2
Double Cheeseburger
RE: French fries: Are homemade fries worth effort? 2005/11/10 09:15:36
we have been making home-made fries for three years now. remember, we have no employees, so it has to be easy. just wrap and bake potatos(idaho works best) the night before(at home) or the day before(at work) and chill. once chilled, cut them lenghthwise, by hand into steak fries. fry til desired crisp in cheap oil, sprinkle on seasoning salt, and serve.
we now go through 200 pounds or more in a 5 day work week(keep in mind, 7 other side dishes). i usually cut and portion(deli wrap) about a box at a time. shelf life is great!
be careful with sysco....they want to rid the whole world of its money...heehee
u.s. foods will beat their prices, every time\
Copperhedzkettle
Cheeseburger
RE: French fries: Are homemade fries worth effort? 2005/11/10 09:36:24
quote:
Originally posted by bassrocker4u2

we have been making home-made fries for three years now. remember, we have no employees, so it has to be easy. just wrap and bake potatos(idaho works best) the night before(at home) or the day before(at work) and chill. once chilled, cut them lenghthwise, by hand into steak fries. fry til desired crisp in cheap oil, sprinkle on seasoning salt, and serve.
we now go through 200 pounds or more in a 5 day work week(keep in mind, 7 other side dishes). i usually cut and portion(deli wrap) about a box at a time. shelf life is great!
be careful with sysco....they want to rid the whole world of its money...heehee
u.s. foods will beat their prices, every time



What a wonderful idea, Bass! I never thought of that.

I like the gold colored Tates that taste so buttery. Yummy. Can't recall the name right now, but they are delicious, and I like mine with the skins on.

Nothing beats Taters. Hashbrowns for breakfast, fries for lunch and baked for Supper. Ideal.

Copper
blizzardstormus
Cheeseburger
RE: French fries: Are homemade fries worth effort? 2005/11/10 18:46:35
Bassrocker, your idea is a good one. We do a steak fry like yours and serve with homemade Ranch dressing. Customers love them & food cost is phenomenal. We also use our extra baked potatoes to make our hashbrowns. What an improvement over frozen. And don't even start on dehydrated hashbrowns.
This afternoo I received a French Fry cutter from another restaurant owner who didn't want it (it's brand new). I will be experimenting with homemade fries. I'll try any suggestion posted here & let you know the results.
Fieldthistle
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: French fries: Are homemade fries worth effort? 2005/11/11 13:25:09
Hello All,
Bassrocker, I am a lover of French Fries and admire you that you are thinking of having "homemade" fries rather than frozen, processed ones. In my family, I am the one that makes French Fries and try to maintain a consistent flavour and quality.
Remember, I am not a real French Fry maker, but I play one in my family.
1. I've discovered that the age of the potato really determines the quality of the fries. New potatoes have a different flavour, texture, and even a different amount of time to fry them to get just right taste than middle-aged potatoes or older ones. I am serious that the age of the potatoes produces different results and need different frying techniques. I prefer older potatoes.
2. The same can be said as far as the age of the oil, lard or whatever you fry the potatoes in. I hate new oil. The fries have a different flavour with the age of oil, which I am sure you already know.
3. I am sure you know that the type of potato also determines the taste, texture, frying time, etc., but which would you pick that would create a "brand" flavour for you eatery. Certain potatoes tastes better with certain foods. I prefer Yukon Gold, while my family prefers Idaho. Eating out, I may not be able to determine where the potato came from, but when I make them at home, I can tell the difference, (and so can my family) where that potato came from.
4. I hand peel and slice, but of course you would have to purchase equipment to peel and slice the potatoes in order to lessen labour intensity. Personally, the lack of uniformity gives homemade fries a certain charm, but also can increase waste.
As I said, I just make them at home. It boggles my mind how a busy eatery can make homemade fries without charging more because of the labour involved. But I just cook at home and do not use French Fry peelers or cutters.
And also, to go or delivered fries do lose charm when they are cold. You can't really enjoy homemade fries cold or microwaved.
Take Care,
Fieldthistle
V960
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: French fries: Are homemade fries worth effort? 2005/11/11 16:15:27
Fieelstistle...you are the man! Aging potaoes? Seriously, you are my hero!!! Not a easily attained stature around here.
eaglerich
Junior Burger
RE: French fries: Are homemade fries worth effort? 2005/11/13 04:09:12
Blizzardstormus, you are correct. Fresh made fries are delicious hot and fresh from the fryer, but they are inedible after a 10 minute drive home in a paper bag.
-Tricky-
Cheeseburger
RE: French fries: Are homemade fries worth effort? 2005/11/13 12:03:30
quote:
Originally posted by eaglerich

Fresh made fries are delicious hot and fresh from the fryer, but they are inedible after a 10 minute drive home in a paper bag.

But so are frozen fries.
V960
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: French fries: Are homemade fries worth effort? 2005/11/13 15:31:00
EEnglish I must disgree. Fresh made is always better. Sorry my fingers don't work as well as they used to.
Greyghost
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: French fries: Are homemade fries worth effort? 2005/11/13 16:38:24
Keep it real. If you have first rate fries word will get around. People will come just for the great fries. I know I would.
ScreenBear
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: French fries: Are homemade fries worth effort? 2006/02/24 22:58:16
Good fries are memorable. As many here agree, for all the talk of the dogs at Pittsburgh's Original O, everyone is in agreement about how wonderful their fries are.

Incidentally, the fries at Amazing Hot Dog, 148A Bloomfield Ave., Verona, New Jersey, are quite delightful. See John Fox's post under NJ Hot Dogs for the complete review.
The Bear
lo-in -the -keys
Junior Burger
RE: French fries: Are homemade fries worth effort? 2006/02/25 19:27:05
Yeah, I'm so glad to see someone else talking about the "O" s fries.
If you are asking if they are worth it? It's worth going to PGH and trying for your self!!. They are the best, I need to go back home and get some before they're not there anymore
Burgerman1
Hamburger
RE: French fries: Are homemade fries worth effort? 2006/02/26 00:41:01
If anyone is interested...Northern Tool Company has a potato cutter in stock. I think it's running about $40. The unit that I saw was pretty substantial...not quiet as heavy duty as the professional but would do considering the price of most food equipment companies. They also have a website for anyone that doesn't have a store near them.
lunasatic
Cheeseburger
RE: French fries: Are homemade fries worth effort? 2006/02/28 14:22:59
quote:
Originally posted by Copperhedzkettle

quote:
Originally posted by bassrocker4u2

we have been making home-made fries for three years now. remember, we have no employees, so it has to be easy. just wrap and bake potatos(idaho works best) the night before(at home) or the day before(at work) and chill. once chilled, cut them lenghthwise, by hand into steak fries. fry til desired crisp in cheap oil, sprinkle on seasoning salt, and serve.
we now go through 200 pounds or more in a 5 day work week(keep in mind, 7 other side dishes). i usually cut and portion(deli wrap) about a box at a time. shelf life is great!
be careful with sysco....they want to rid the whole world of its money...heehee
u.s. foods will beat their prices, every time



What a wonderful idea, Bass! I never thought of that.

I like the gold colored Tates that taste so buttery. Yummy. Can't recall the name right now, but they are delicious, and I like mine with the skins on.

Nothing beats Taters. Hashbrowns for breakfast, fries for lunch and baked for Supper. Ideal.

Copper



I think you're referring to Yukon Golds-somewhat pricey down here, but well worth it!
drsmoke02
Cheeseburger
RE: French fries: Are homemade fries worth effort? 2006/02/28 16:52:46
quote:
Originally posted by bassrocker4u2

we have been making home-made fries for three years now. remember, we have no employees, so it has to be easy. just wrap and bake potatos(idaho works best) the night before(at home) or the day before(at work) and chill. once chilled, cut them lenghthwise, by hand into steak fries. fry til desired crisp in cheap oil, sprinkle on seasoning salt, and serve.
we now go through 200 pounds or more in a 5 day work week(keep in mind, 7 other side dishes). i usually cut and portion(deli wrap) about a box at a time. shelf life is great!
be careful with sysco....they want to rid the whole world of its money...heehee
u.s. foods will beat their prices, every time



Bass,can you use a french fry cutter on the baked potato after its cold or does it fall apart if you try? great way to eliminate 2 stage frying.
BTB
Cheeseburger
RE: French fries: Are homemade fries worth effort? 2006/03/01 18:24:14
Please, please, please, try serving the fresh cut fries, even tho it maybe a little more work to prepare. I'm a professional customer and we're allowed to peek into this forum every once in a while. I just love fresh cut french fries and I'll alway remember which restaurants have them and go out of my way to get them along with my meal.

One sandwich shop nearby has the best fresh cut fries and while their sandwiches are good, there's another sandwich shop down the road that serves a little better sandwich, but not the fresh cut fries. They just fry up the frozen quick fries, nothing special, so I will invariably go to the shop with the fresh cut fries instead.

Believe me, there are alot of us out there that crave fresh cut fries. I had such a hankering for them from reading the responses to this forum that I cooked some up for dinner today. I tried Klondike Gold for the first time, soaked them for an hour or two in the refrigerator (with ice), and did the double fry thing. Boy, they were outstanding.
Burgerman1
Hamburger
RE: French fries: Are homemade fries worth effort? 2006/03/01 19:11:31
There are several places in my hometown that serves fresh cut fries. One place has fairly crispy fries, but of course 10 mins in a bag and they are limp, tasty but limp. The other place has soft fries, often called greasy...they actually taste better than the first place.

So tell me how do you perfer your homecut fries? Crispy, somewhat cripsy, or limp?

Adjudicator
Sirloin
RE: French fries: Are homemade fries worth effort? 2006/03/01 19:31:43
Let's face it. Most all fries are good right out of the fryer, homemade or not. Why would anyone eat them any other way?
bassrocker4u2
Double Cheeseburger
RE: French fries: Are homemade fries worth effort? 2006/03/02 08:03:37
dr smoke
nah, i dont use a fry cutter. i like the hand cut appeal, plus its so much faster to do by hand. unwrap, cut in half lengthwise. cut each half into 4-6 pieces. i use a butcher knife. on a good day, i can do 50 pounds, cut and wrapped, under 30 min. but..... i dont have many good days anymore....
V960
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: French fries: Are homemade fries worth effort? 2006/03/02 08:21:30
The pomme frittes from a road side trailer in Belgium are ten times better than any ff I've had in the states.
hefried
Cheeseburger
RE: French fries: Are homemade fries worth effort? 2006/03/02 15:41:52
YA use a fry cutter!just wash the tato's and don't peel..... and PAR COOK the fries, take them out of the oil and RE FRY until crisp just before serving.
Homemade(or handmade) fried taste rockin'good when done right but insipid when not. be sure to teach your fry cooks WHAT a crispy fresh french fry should be like..........
Xfireguy
Cheeseburger
RE: French fries: Are homemade fries worth effort? 2006/03/02 16:07:17
Does anyone know the temperature to fry fresh cut fries. I want to "blanch" them first then fry them so i'll need 2 friolators. What are the 2 temps?
rjb
Cheeseburger
RE: French fries: Are homemade fries worth effort? 2006/03/02 16:10:04
quote:
Originally posted by Xfireguy

Does anyone know the temperature to fry fresh cut fries. I want to "blanch" them first then fry them so i'll need 2 friolators. What are the 2 temps?


I do 320 for the first and 365 for the second. First fry temp depends on the amount and temp of the fries.
V960
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: French fries: Are homemade fries worth effort? 2006/03/02 19:10:09
see fourth post for temps.
blizzardstormus
Cheeseburger
RE: French fries: Are homemade fries worth effort? 2006/03/04 15:10:13

Thanks for everyone's input on this subject.

We have been making our own fries for about 6 weeks now. After experimenting, we came up with the following procedure: we peel & cut our potaoes and hold the fries in ice water. We do not double-fry due to time constraints. We drain the fries & fry. Our fries are not as crispy as some would like, but most of our customers are very pleased with the change.

Next to the fries is our homemade pork loin sandwich which is considered to be one of the top 5 tenderloins in the state of Iowa by the Iowa Pork producers.
RibRater
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: French fries: Are homemade fries worth effort? 2006/03/04 15:41:03
fabulous looking plate of chow.....nice job blizzardstormus
lleechef
Sirloin
RE: French fries: Are homemade fries worth effort? 2006/03/06 15:37:52
Looks lovely and quite edible!
Fieldthistle
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: French fries: Are homemade fries worth effort? 2006/03/07 05:27:14
Hello All,
Blizzard, I'd like to order a plate of your pork loin sandwich and fries now.
Great looking. I don't mind lest crispy home fries as long as they are hot
when served.
Take Care,
Fieldthistle
waffleslave
Junior Burger
RE: French fries: Are homemade fries worth effort? 2006/03/17 08:25:18
Yes, they are worth the effort, but instead of peeling them select a potatoe with a thin "clean" skin and invest in a potatoe cutter that will make it faster. Soaking potatoes in water will just help soak out the flavor. Keeping the peel on will keep it in.
Jeza
Junior Burger
RE: French fries: Are homemade fries worth effort? 2006/03/17 23:38:43
If you seriously want good fries look at getting a mondolin cutter. A good French one will have a life time guarantee on it. They cut fries consistantly, and evenly.

We also cut our own fries and it ended up reducing the food cost substantially enough to put someone on to do it. However we are not a large restaurant by any means so catering to the size of our clientelle for fries is easier. We also serve croquettes, baby potatoes and other starch substitutes so fries aren't always on the high end of orders for sides.
andreashafer
Junior Burger
RE: French fries: Are homemade fries worth effort? 2006/03/17 23:53:10
hey there Xfireguy you dont need 2 fryers set one or 2 days out of the week to do your fries. Set your fryer on 325 then blanche all your fries when they are done pour them onto a full sheet cake pan fill the pan with fries place on a tray in your walk in cooler let cool then portion up your orders or leave on tray if you have the room and then fry to order at about 350 to 375 until done the shelf life on potatoes prepped like this is usually about 3 or 4 days
drsmoke02
Cheeseburger
RE: French fries: Are homemade fries worth effort? 2006/03/19 15:41:11
quote:
Originally posted by andreashafer

hey there Xfireguy you dont need 2 fryers set one or 2 days out of the week to do your fries. Set your fryer on 325 then blanche all your fries when they are done pour them onto a full sheet cake pan fill the pan with fries place on a tray in your walk in cooler let cool then portion up your orders or leave on tray if you have the room and then fry to order at about 350 to 375 until done the shelf life on potatoes prepped like this is usually about 3 or 4 days


Andre is absolutely correct,blanch at 325 ahead of time actually adds flavor IMHO especially if you use peanut oil,375 to finish them off.
koloa
Junior Burger
RE: French fries: Are homemade fries worth effort? 2006/03/19 17:42:47
im not sure if it was mentioned here, but i was told over in another forum that some restaurant owners boil their potatoes, when done, put in the fridge where they can keep for awhile and cool. when rdy to cook, just cut them up and fry at 375. no need to double fry.
roossy90
Sirloin
RE: French fries: Are homemade fries worth effort? 2006/03/19 17:51:05
I think home made are just too limp... I like mine crispy.. but then again, I like crinkle cuts best also.
I worked in a place that cut them and kept them in water, and they were always limpish. Is that a word?
MilwFoodlovers
Filet Mignon
RE: French fries: Are homemade fries worth effort? 2006/03/19 18:28:00
roosy90, by no means are all homemade fries limp. On the contrary, classically made, they are crunchy on the outside and soft inside.
drsmoke02
Cheeseburger
RE: French fries: Are homemade fries worth effort? 2006/03/19 20:43:14
quote:
Originally posted by koloa

im not sure if it was mentioned here, but i was told over in another forum that some restaurant owners boil their potatoes, when done, put in the fridge where they can keep for awhile and cool. when rdy to cook, just cut them up and fry at 375. no need to double fry.


wrong.
wallhd
Cheeseburger
RE: French fries: Are homemade fries worth effort? 2006/03/19 20:57:10
Back in the dark ages of fast food, even McDonalds fresh cut their fries.

What a shame when they switched to frozen.

And even worse when they changed from using lard.

They might have been a lot more competition for us mom and pop places if they hadn't changed, so maybe it's not such a shame after all.
koloa
Junior Burger
RE: French fries: Are homemade fries worth effort? 2006/03/20 08:53:36

wrong as in?
quote:
Originally posted by drsmoke02

quote:
Originally posted by koloa

im not sure if it was mentioned here, but i was told over in another forum that some restaurant owners boil their potatoes, when done, put in the fridge where they can keep for awhile and cool. when rdy to cook, just cut them up and fry at 375. no need to double fry.


wrong.
damon2
Junior Burger
RE: French fries: Are homemade fries worth effort? 2006/04/20 13:45:07
quote:
Originally posted by blizzardstormus


Thanks for everyone's input on this subject.

We have been making our own fries for about 6 weeks now. After experimenting, we came up with the following procedure: we peel & cut our potaoes and hold the fries in ice water. We do not double-fry due to time constraints. We drain the fries & fry. Our fries are not as crispy as some would like, but most of our customers are very pleased with the change.

Next to the fries is our homemade pork loin sandwich which is considered to be one of the top 5 tenderloins in the state of Iowa by the Iowa Pork producers.


Going to give your idea a try, now..nudge..nudge..how do you make that pork loin sandwich...working on my summer menu
adbunting
Hamburger
RE: French fries: Are homemade fries worth effort? 2006/05/03 18:29:57
Tried the baked/steak fry thing.

They were great! Soft on the inside, crispy on the outside. I like mine well-done, but you can take 'em out any time.
I found the twice fried method works really well.

April
blizzardstormus
Cheeseburger
RE: French fries: Are homemade fries worth effort? 2006/05/03 18:43:57
After further experimenting, we now peel & cut a case of Idaho potatoes, soak for a half hour, and then par-fry at 325 degrees for 6 minutes. We finish the fries later by frying at 350 degrees until crisp. Fantastic fries!

I have noticed that the younger a customer is, the more likely he or she will not like our fries (addicted to McDonald's).

Damon2, we trim & cut pork loin, weigh it out at 5 ounces, and tenderize it by passing the meat through our antique tenderizer 3 to 4 times. At the time of the order, we eggwash the cutlet and bread it in a flour mixture consisting of one part flour, one part cornflake crumbs, & one part SLO-BRO seasoning flour. Good luck

damon2
Junior Burger
RE: French fries: Are homemade fries worth effort? 2006/05/04 11:30:46
thanks, don't have a tenderizer..but I'm sure I can come up with an alternative...know I've got a meat mallot sitting around somewhere..on your fries...whats the size of your cut, currently we're using a steak fry cut
koloa
Junior Burger
RE: French fries: Are homemade fries worth effort? 2006/05/07 20:27:54
ive tried the boil first, cool in fridge, cut them and then fry at 375. i could barely notice a difference. dash some salt or old bay and the fries were just as good as the regular double fry method.
wr_mccoy
Junior Burger
RE: French fries: Are homemade fries worth effort? 2006/05/07 21:38:27
All I know is, Boardwalk French Fries are too good. They cook them at two different times, I'm told.