My New York "Roadfood" diary

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BT
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My New York "Roadfood" diary - Sun, 01/8/06 1:43 PM
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Day 1--The train was late, it was cold and raining so after checking into my hotel around 2 PM, I just wanted a quick bite of lunch--which I obtained across the street at the Chelsea Papaya : 2 Sabrett hot dogs slathered with mustard and onion relish with a diet soda. Then I headed uptown on the 6th Ave. subway to Macy’s to check out the after Christmas sale but didn’t see anything and by then it was dinner time.

I walked over to Park Ave and took the subway back down to Astor place and a crosstown bus to 6th and first Ave where I ate at Banjara, an Indian place which Zagat’s rates among the best in New York. This area (actually in the East Village) is apparently known to locals as “curry hill”, a pun on the nearby “Murray Hill” area because there are many Indian restaurants. Banjara, however, was excellent--I had a fiery chicken vindaloo which differed from what I’m used to in having no obvious tamarind in the sauce. Anyway, it was excellent (as were the accompaniments I ordered, especially the raita which was probably the best I’ve ever had) and, at $28 including 2 Kingfisher beers, the price seemed consistent with what I’d expect to pay in San Francisco. Sadly, though, I feel I should report that the vindaloo was at least as fiery on the way out as on the way in--be warned.

Day 2--Slept a bit late and decided to skip breakfast in favor of “brunch” at Katz’s. Subway’d down and walked around a bit, then went in and had a corned beef sandwich on rye with a “half done” pickle. The corned beef was superb, in part because it had plenty of fat. It was also cooked to the point of extreme tenderness. I have to quibble with the pickle, however. I definitely asked for “half done”--what I got had spent, I think, maybe seconds in the pickling brine and was hard to distinguish from an unpickled cucumber. Yeah, at $14 or so it was not a cheap sandwich, but I think it was a classic of its kind and so was worth it.

After eating at Katz’s, I went on down and ogled the World Trade Center site, walked around Wall St. and then back tracked for a mid-afternoon snack at a place I couldn’t leave town without trying: The Dumpling House on Eldridge St. in Chinatown. Here you crowd into a narrow storefront with the locals, elbow your way to a counter and assertively order. What you order is excellent fried dumplings (known in SF as pot stickers), 5 for $1 which has to be the bargain of the decade. When you get them you can do as I did, buy a soda for another $1, then elbow your way to a small counter at the back (seats maybe 4 people), douse the dumplings in Sriracha hot sauce and eat them. At $3 for 10 dumplings and a soda, this is, I think, the best lunch bargain in America (the dumplings alone can cost about $0.60 apiece in SF). I also saw other customers, mostly Chinese-speaking, order luscious looking soups (I saw corn, hot/sour, dumpling in broth and noodle soups).

In fact, the soup looked so good that it gave me an idea for dinner: The weather being rather raw, a warm steaming bowl of ramen sounded good (it’s my staple in SF when the fog blows in) so I headed to Menchanko-Tei on 55th St. between 5th and 6th Aves. Slurped up with a large Kirin, it cost $18 including tip, once again about what you’d pay in SF.

Finally, after taking in a movie in Times Square, I grabbed another Sabrett dog on the way to bed.

Day 3-- 2-block walk over to 5th Ave. took me to Eisenberg’s Sandwich Shop for a cup of coffee and a passable bagel with excellent lox and cream cheese.

But I had to have more dumplings; I am seriously addicted to them. Only a block away from the Dumpling House is another dumpling spot, Fried Dumpling at 99 Allen St., so I headed there and got a double order (10 for $2). Frankly, the dumplings seemed better at the Dumpling House but Fried Dumpling is a whisker more eat-in friendly, offering a couple of small tables in front. To be fair, though, I hit Dumpling House at a busy time and got my order from a fresh batch whereas I intentionally hit Fried Dumpling before any lunchtime crowd and my order had been sitting a while.

Anyway, after I had my dumpling fix I headed uptown to the Metropolitan Museum but on the short walk from the Lexington Ave. subway over to 5th Ave. I grabbed some fresh honey-roasted nuts from a street vendor--darned good.

After a few hours in the Met and a walk across Central Park to the West Side, I subwayed down to 50th St. where, upon emerging from the station I decided to try a slice of pizza from Famiglia which bills itself as the “official pizza of the New York Yankees”. This is mass market pizza, no coal-fired ovens or any of that stuff here, but it was quite acceptable and I’d love having anything as good in Arizona.

For dinner, I got a craving for Thai which I haven’t had since leaving San Francisco for the winter. There seems to be some kind of consensus that THE Thai restaurant in New York is Sripraphai on 39th Ave. in Woodside, Queens. To be honest, I simply wasn’t able to get a map that shows the kind of detail about the outer boroughs that would allow me to be sure the 7 train to Woodside would get me anywhere near the restaurant, so I decided second best would have to do. That meant one of several places on or near 9th Ave. in the upper 40’s and 50’s (Hell’s Kitchen/Clinton). I picked Pam Real Thai on 49th just off 9th Ave (between 9th and 10th). I had my usual beef salad and chicken mussamun curry. Here, the beef salad dressing seemed to make little use of nam pla (fish sauce) as it always does in San Francisco and seemed to put more emphasis on lime but it tasted very good. The curry also was a bit different--thinner than I am used to but very tasty and containing lots of peanuts (mussamun is not a hot curry). I washed all this down with 2 excellent Thai iced teas.

And then I went to the movies--King Kong at the AMC 25 on 42nd St. just off Times Square--and following the flick, I just had to see if the theater where Kong was supposedly exhibited in the movie really exists, so I hiked the 5 blocks to 7th Ave at 46th (the street signs and unique neon display are very recognizable in the movie) to see if there was an “Alhambra Theater” there. In fact, it’s the Palace Theater and the musical “Lestat” is currently playing there. Then is was on up Broadway to the 50th St. station to catch the 7th Ave. local back to my hotel but, feeling a few new hunger pains I grabbed what turned out to be a pretty good tuna salad sandwich to go at the Majestic Deli (50th at 8th Ave.)

Day 4--Started the day with a chocolate croissant and coffee (good, but I’ve had better in SF) at a little place near my hotel--frankly, I can’t recall the name but it’s on the corner of 23rd and 8th Ave. Since I’d had no Italian food since coming to town (other than mass market pizza), for lunch I decided to try a little place on Prince St. in SoHo named Il Corallo Trattoria which Zagat rated highly (23 on food) and described as “friendly” and “cheap for SoHo.” My $20 lunch consisted of a good (not great) soup of white beans and spinach in broth and a heaping bowl of farfalle Amatriciana which was heavily sauced and very good.

Then I headed uptown to check out the skating at Rockefeller Center and for another crack at the after-Christmas sale merchandise on 5th Ave. By dinner time I was pretty worn down and needed a spicy pick me up--some Sichuan food seemed the ticket and an excellent source was nearby: Wu Liang Ye (a 3-location New York semi-chain but highly rated by all the guides I checked). I had an appetizer of Dan Dan noodles, a dish I’ve e had often in SF and love, but I have to say that here it was revelatory: plenty of heat but vinegary and with a wonderful hint of star anise. This I followed with a main course of “smokey beef with capsicum” which showed an unusual 2 chile symbol on the menu, but compared to the noodles, was somewhat disappointing (where was the fire?) though tasty. The tab, at $28 and change was the highest of my trip but quite reasonable I thought.

Day 5--Left New York in late afternoon, but first I breakfasted at Murray’s Bagels (which looks chainish but busy) on 8th Ave. The onion bagel was really excellent, the massive glob of mildly lox-infused cream cheese was mediocre (had I known they didn’t offer actual lox--slices of fish--I probably would have eaten elsewhere).

For lunch, I had to have more of those Dumpling House dumplings. The truth is, these are not the best Chinese fried dumplings I’ve ever had (that honor probably belongs to a newly opened place on Larkin St. 2 blocks from my San Francisco apartment), but they are by far the cheapest really good ones and I just plain love dumplings.

After another brief subway ride and a stroll through the West Village it was time to head for the station. Adios, NYC! With luck, the train will be on time to Chicago in the morning and I’ll be able to grab lunch at the Berghoff.

Day 6--Or not. Berghoff is closed Sundays. So I hopped an “El” to Lincoln Park and grabbed lunch at a little taqueria called Los 3 Panchos. To a west coaster, my "super burrito seemed an interesting fusion of Mexican and Lebanese, the wrapper resembling lavash as much as a flour tortilla and the “crema” inside being closely related to mid-eastern yogurt sauces. Still, it was tasty and the green sauce offered on the side was yummy in liberal amounts.

And so, as I wait for the next train out of Chicago, here I sit in Starbucks using their web access to send this off.

As an aside, I’m sure most of you know by now )there having been major articles in the New York Times and elsewhere) that the Second Ave. Deli is closed, probably for good, as the management claims they cannot afford their landlord’s new rent demand.


Sundancer7
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RE: My New York "Roadfood" diary - Sun, 01/8/06 2:48 PM
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New York is such a fine place for food finds and it sounds to me like you explored it very good. There are so many places there that are excellent. I am glad you enjoyed your trip.

I hae visited NYC many times and always enjoyed the many options there.

Paul E. smith
knoxville, TN

wheregreggeats.com
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RE: My New York "Roadfood" diary - Sun, 01/8/06 3:26 PM
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Nice report ... A lot of places we don't hear about very often ... I'll have to take note.

Thanks.

mousec
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RE: My New York "Roadfood" diary - Sun, 01/8/06 6:01 PM
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Two questions:

What were in the dumplings and why (how did you) choose Los 3 Panchos? There are so many terrific places in Chicago that it souned as if you ended up at one of our typical (nothing out of the oridinary) burrito stands.


sizz
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RE: My New York "Roadfood" diary - Sun, 01/8/06 9:32 PM
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Good job BT................ that tour of NY had you walking big time..... a lot of folks do not realize that walking NY City is a great way to get around ...walk eat, walk eat, walk eat, walk eat................ lol I see your riding the rail back to Tucson.... do they still call that train to Chicago the " Empire State Express"? and then on your way south you'll be riding on a train they call the "City of New Orleans" ..sounds like the words to a great song............... Happy Trails BT

mr chips
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RE: My New York "Roadfood" diary - Mon, 01/9/06 2:39 AM
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Great report. I look forward to meeting you next week and taking in the culinary delights of southern Arizona and la frontera.

BT
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RE: My New York "Roadfood" diary - Wed, 01/11/06 4:42 AM
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quote:
Originally posted by mousec

Two questions:

What were in the dumplings and why (how did you) choose Los 3 Panchos? There are so many terrific places in Chicago that it souned as if you ended up at one of our typical (nothing out of the oridinary) burrito stands.




I had a 5-hr layover on the train. I hoped to have lunch at Berghoff but forgot about it being Sunday. I hiked down Adams from the station and found it closed. I had no Chicago guide books with me but I pretty much figured I wouldn't find anyplace open in the Loop and vaguely remembered (from a previous trip I did to Chicago like the one just completed to New York) Lincoln Park and environs as having lots of places, so I kept walking down Adams to the Brown Line El station, climbed aboard and got off at Diversy (based on the look of the "hood" from up on the El). I walked down the street a few blocks, passed Starbucks, and didn't see anything interesting until I came to a corner with an Italian joint that looked interesting--but it turned out also to be closed for another hour (until noon--keep in mind it's about 28 degrees, I'm standing out in the cold and have to be back to the station in 3 hours). I remembered passing Los 3 Panchos. Yes, it looked like a burrito stand but in San Francisco I often eat at such places and I hadn't had a decent taco or burrito in weeks. Besides, the place was warm and the girl behind the counter was friendly. I don't regret the choice.

About the dumplings--officially, they contain pork with scallions. In San Francisco, they'd be called garden variety potstickers. I love 'em.

BT
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RE: My New York "Roadfood" diary - Wed, 01/11/06 4:50 AM
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quote:
Originally posted by fpczyz

Good job BT................ that tour of NY had you walking big time..... a lot of folks do not realize that walking NY City is a great way to get around ...walk eat, walk eat, walk eat, walk eat................ lol I see your riding the rail back to Tucson.... do they still call that train to Chicago the " Empire State Express"? and then on your way south you'll be riding on a train they call the "City of New Orleans" ..sounds like the words to a great song............... Happy Trails BT


Paul, the New York to Chicago train is "The Lake Shore Limited". The train from Chicago to LA via Tucson is "The Texas Eagle"--goes a bit west of the "City of New Orleans". Actually, shortly after we left Chicago I fired up iTunes on my laptop and the first song that played was Arlo's "City of New Orleans". We were passing through Joliet, not Kankakee, and ultimately, St. Louis, not Memphis and San Antonio, not New Orleans. But I've ridden the City of New Orleans before and hope to again.

Benzee
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RE: My New York "Roadfood" diary - Wed, 01/11/06 7:18 PM
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BT ,

Excellent trip report on the Big Apple . It is amazing what kind of fine restaurants you can find with a littl bit of research .

The 2nd Ave. Deli is now closed . Newspapers in NYC today showed the signs coming down.
The landlord wanted to raise the rent $9,000 on the new lease .

There are many great restaurants in the outer boroughs also , subways and busses can get you to most and if you dare a Cab can get you the rest of the way .

Very enjoyable reading

Benzee


mousec
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RE: My New York "Roadfood" diary - Wed, 01/11/06 11:02 PM
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quote:
Originally posted by BT

quote:
Originally posted by mousec

Two questions:

What were in the dumplings and why (how did you) choose Los 3 Panchos? There are so many terrific places in Chicago that it souned as if you ended up at one of our typical (nothing out of the oridinary) burrito stands.


Than;s for the f/u. Next time that you are in Chicago you may want to check out Ed's Potsticker House.

http://www.lthforum.com/bb/viewtopic.php?t=712&highlight=eds

I had a 5-hr layover on the train. I hoped to have lunch at Berghoff but forgot about it being Sunday. I hiked down Adams from the station and found it closed. I had no Chicago guide books with me but I pretty much figured I wouldn't find anyplace open in the Loop and vaguely remembered (from a previous trip I did to Chicago like the one just completed to New York) Lincoln Park and environs as having lots of places, so I kept walking down Adams to the Brown Line El station, climbed aboard and got off at Diversy (based on the look of the "hood" from up on the El). I walked down the street a few blocks, passed Starbucks, and didn't see anything interesting until I came to a corner with an Italian joint that looked interesting--but it turned out also to be closed for another hour (until noon--keep in mind it's about 28 degrees, I'm standing out in the cold and have to be back to the station in 3 hours). I remembered passing Los 3 Panchos. Yes, it looked like a burrito stand but in San Francisco I often eat at such places and I hadn't had a decent taco or burrito in weeks. Besides, the place was warm and the girl behind the counter was friendly. I don't regret the choice.

About the dumplings--officially, they contain pork with scallions. In San Francisco, they'd be called garden variety potstickers. I love 'em.
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The Travelin Man
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RE: My New York "Roadfood" diary - Thu, 01/12/06 9:24 AM
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BT -- excellent trip report. I have some new places to hit in NYC when I get there again!

Pigiron
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RE: My New York "Roadfood" diary - Thu, 01/12/06 12:14 PM
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quote:
Originally posted by BT


I walked over to Park Ave and took the subway back down to Astor place and a crosstown bus to 6th and first Ave where I ate at Banjara, an Indian place which Zagat’s rates among the best in New York. This area (actually in the East Village) is apparently known to locals as “curry hill”, a pun on the nearby “Murray Hill” area because there are many Indian restaurants.


You got that a little backwards. 6th Street between 1st and 2nd Avenues and "Curry Hill" are 2 different things. "Curry Hill" refers to Lexington around 34th to 23rd. Lots of Pakistani mixed in with the Indian restaurants, along with some amazing spice shops. East 6th is a residential block lined with Indian restaurants (although there have been a lot of japanese placed moving onto that block).


quote:
Day 2--Slept a bit late and decided to skip breakfast in favor of “brunch” at Katz’s. Subway’d down and walked around a bit, then went in and had a corned beef sandwich on rye with a “half done” pickle. The corned beef was superb, in part because it had plenty of fat. It was also cooked to the point of extreme tenderness. I have to quibble with the pickle, however. I definitely asked for “half done”--what I got had spent, I think, maybe seconds in the pickling brine and was hard to distinguish from an unpickled cucumber.


Minor quibble here- what you had was a "half-sour", and you're right, it's nowhere near as good as a "full-sour". I personally think you made a huge mistake in getting the corned beef over the pastrami at Katz's.

quote:

Only a block away from the Dumpling House is another dumpling spot, Fried Dumpling at 99 Allen St., so I headed there and got a double order (10 for $2).


Don't tell anyone about Fried Dumpling!!! It's always too crowded as it is. It's my absolute favorite spot in the city for a quick bite.

quote:


After a few hours in the Met and a walk across Central Park to the West Side, I subwayed down to 50th St. where, upon emerging from the station I decided to try a slice of pizza from Famiglia which bills itself as the “official pizza of the New York Yankees”. This is mass market pizza, no coal-fired ovens or any of that stuff here, but it was quite acceptable and I’d love having anything as good in Arizona.


Yeah, Famiglia used to be good, now they are a big chain, and not much better than Sbarro's.


Thanks for the great report. Next time in NYC, be sure to get some real pizza, both kinds: brick oven (Lombardi's is the Mecca) and standard Neopolitan pizzaria (there's literally hundreds of great ones, my favorites are New Pizza Town on the UWS and Luigi's on the UES).

sizz
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RE: My New York "Roadfood" diary - Thu, 01/12/06 2:36 PM
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It was my belief that all the wisenheimers as myself left New York and ventured west but I see there is still one left...........

berndog
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RE: My New York "Roadfood" diary - Thu, 01/12/06 2:53 PM
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BT, thanks for a great report, and fpczyz is right about walking around being a great way to enjoy the city. The last time I was there on business, we stayed at a hotel on Park Ave close to the Met Life building. Walked to Chinatown and back for dinner one evening.

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RE: My New York "Roadfood" diary - Thu, 01/12/06 4:50 PM
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quote:
Originally posted by fpczyz

It was my belief that all the wisenheimers as myself left New York and ventured west but I see there is still one left...........



Does this refer to me? Did I say something offensive?

BT
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RE: My New York "Roadfood" diary - Thu, 01/12/06 5:35 PM
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quote:
Originally posted by Pigiron

Minor quibble here- what you had was a "half-sour", and you're right, it's nowhere near as good as a "full-sour". I personally think you made a huge mistake in getting the corned beef over the pastrami at Katz's.


I have to stick with what I've said. I have always preferred "half-done" pickles to "full sour", and lament that they are hard to get away from the east coast, everywhere else I've eaten them which has included many places up and down the coast (after all, I grew up there) from New York to Miami Beach. Katz's pickle was not, IMHO, "half done"--it was barely pickled at all, but even so I actually didn't dislike it, I just wished for a bit more time in the pickle barrel.

As for the sandwich, the awful truth is I don't like pastrami nearly as much as I like corned beef. For me it's "OK" but I really love corned beef.

quote:
Don't tell anyone about Fried Dumpling!!! It's always too crowded as it is. It's my absolute favorite spot in the city for a quick bite.


I didn't blow your secret, several guidebook writers did, but I have to repeat--if you haven't tried the Dumpling House (sadly, even more crowded) only a block and a half away, you should.

quote:
Yeah, Famiglia used to be good, now they are a big chain, and not much better than Sbarro's.


IMHO it was better than the Sbarro's in every US mall, though maybe not better than the ones in NYC. I didn't try Sbarro's there--that would have been too humiliating. I did look for the opportunity to have a coal oven pizza but I weigh more than a few pounds too much as it is and just stuffing one down to say I did it didn't seem like something I wanted to do (some of the best places apparently don't sell them "by the slice"). After all, I have had them before. This wasn't my first trip to New York. Just my first trip since early 2001.


BT
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RE: My New York "Roadfood" diary - Thu, 01/12/06 5:37 PM
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quote:
Originally posted by Pigiron

quote:
Originally posted by fpczyz

It was my belief that all the wisenheimers as myself left New York and ventured west but I see there is still one left...........



Does this refer to me? Did I say something offensive?


Not to me. As I read what you said, it was constructive debate which I had hoped to provoke and I appreciate it.

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RE: My New York "Roadfood" diary - Thu, 01/12/06 7:36 PM
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quote:
Pigiron Posted - 01/12/2006 : 16:50:44
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

quote:
Originally posted by fpczyz

It was my belief that all the wisenheimers as myself left New York and ventured west but I see there is still one left...........




Does this refer to me? Did I say something offensive?


Sorry Pigiron, I just thought your critiquing of BT's report was a little on the nitty gritty side ........... but I see BT took no offence so I'm backing off on my Wisenheimer remark......... sorry, and it's real good to see BT is once again "provoking constructive debate " ............. Open the flood gates. .......Frank C.

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RE: My New York "Roadfood" diary - Sat, 01/14/06 4:08 PM
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quote:
Originally posted by fpczyz

Sorry Pigiron, I just thought your critiquing of BT's report was a little on the nitty gritty side


I'm not sure what you mean by "nitty gritty", but I was simply pointing out that if you order a "half-done" pickle, you will probably get a blank stare. It's called a "half-sour", at least in NYC.

sizz
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RE: My New York "Roadfood" diary - Sat, 01/14/06 4:44 PM
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quote:
Pigiron Posted - 01/14/2006 : 16:08:35
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

quote:
Originally posted by fpczyz

Sorry Pigiron, I just thought your critiquing of BT's report was a little on the nitty gritty side


I'm not sure what you mean by "nitty gritty", but I was simply pointing out that if you order a "half-done" pickle, you will probably get a blank stare. It's called a "half-sour", at least in NYC.


Half-done, half-sour ....ok ok how about "to close to call"
Thank god BT didn't order a Knish


BT
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RE: My New York "Roadfood" diary - Sat, 01/14/06 7:51 PM
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quote:
Originally posted by Pigiron


Originally posted by fpczyz

if you order a "half-done" pickle, you will probably get a blank stare. It's called a "half-sour", at least in NYC.


Sorry, but I got their version of what I asked for--they had a pile of quartered ones there ready to be added to somebody's sandwich plate--it just was a bit less "sour" than what I am used to (but what I am used to is a whole lot less sour than what most places would call "full sour"). We called 'em "half-done" in Washington (Hofberg's), Baltimore (Atman's) and Miami (Pumpernick's or Wolfie's) when I was growing up and they were standard deli fare, but I'm sure the average pickle server could interpret from "half-done" to "half-sour" if necessary, don't you? Anyway they did at Katz's.

BT
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RE: My New York "Roadfood" diary - Sat, 01/14/06 7:56 PM
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quote:
Originally posted by fpczyz

Thank god BT didn't order a Knish



Uh, when I was walking from the F-line subway station at 2nd Ave. to Katz's I recall passing a place that advertised knishes in their window and I seriously though about getting one (potato if available). What horror would that have provoked?

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RE: My New York "Roadfood" diary - Sat, 01/14/06 11:14 PM
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That would be Yonah Schimmel's. It's an institution. I never eat there, because, one, I hate knishes, and, two, a cop friend told me a horrible story about the place. For my money it's a pit.

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RE: My New York "Roadfood" diary - Sat, 01/14/06 11:39 PM
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quote:
Originally posted by BT

Uh, when I was walking from the F-line subway station at 2nd Ave. to Katz's I recall passing a place that advertised knishes in their window and I seriously though about getting one (potato if available). What horror would that have provoked?


Yeah, Yonah Schimmel's. They've been in that spot forever. Personally, I think they are too big and too dense and not all that flavorful, but it is an institution. I'm partial to square (fried) knishes anyway.

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RE: My New York "Roadfood" diary - Sat, 01/14/06 11:57 PM
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BT,
I enjoyed your report with vicarious delight. It was quite engaging. I thought it was especially cool that you did your little research project about the theatre after seeing "King Kong." Nice touch.

It's funny, being right across the river, I rarely avail myself of New York's offerings, gastronomic and cultural.

Oh, sure, I get there more than I realize...it does become a part of your life. However, more often than not, you get to see something in NYC when friends or relatives come in and you give them the grand tour.

Fact is, we've got wonderful food in NJ. In fact, I'd put our Italian food up against the Italian food anywhere...any of the boroughs, and certainly a lot of Italy itself.

After moving to Vermont in a couple, I'll be back to eat every few weeks, though, rest assured, I have many favorite haunts in the Green Mountain State.

In any case, glad you consumed and imbibed happily.
The Bear


BT
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RE: My New York "Roadfood" diary - Sun, 01/15/06 1:42 AM
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quote:
Originally posted by Scallion1

That would be Yonah Schimmel's.


By golly, that's right! It's a hard name to forget but I had until you prodded my memory. Is that your hood?

BT
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RE: My New York "Roadfood" diary - Sun, 01/15/06 1:58 AM
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quote:
Originally posted by ScreenBear

BT,
I thought it was especially cool that you did your little research project about the theatre after seeing "King Kong." Nice touch.

It's funny, being right across the river, I rarely avail myself of New York's offerings, gastronomic and cultural.


I grew up in the suburbs of Washington, DC and when I was a senior in high school my friends and I all discovered we had never been to the major tourist sites so we skipped school one day and did them all: White House, Washington Monument, Lincoln Memorial, Capitol Building and the rest (the Smithsonian was an exception--every DC-area school kid has at least one field trip there). It's not unusual to overlook the opportunities staring you in the face.

As to the King Kong bit, I just enjoy seeing things with which I have a personal familiarity portrayed on the silver screen. As a San Franciscan (for the last 24 years), I loved the fact that the various Star Trek movies placed Star Fleet Headquarters in the Presidio and I've watched Star Trek IV many times for all the little SF in jokes (like the need for "exact change" to get on a Muni bus or the failure of the locals to find people dressed up like the Enterprise crew worthy of notice). And, of course, there are any number of of other SF-located flicks I can criticize when they make neighborhoods that are miles apart seem close or otherwise play games with geography (classic example: The movie "Pacific Heights" was filmed not in the ritzy neighborhood of that name but in the much more middle class Potrero Hill but I had fun looking at the shots and figuring out where they were taken from).

cornfed
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RE: My New York "Roadfood" diary - Sun, 01/15/06 3:33 AM
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If you diss Yonah Schimmel's, you diss yourself. The best knishes in the world. Everything is superior. The sweet cheese knishes are heavenly. This is Jewish old school, the real thing just like Katz's if not more. Some of the above poster comments border on some other issue. Yonah is a destination place for any NYer with respect for tradition. Thankfully it has revived, due in large part to the newish Sunshine Theater. Business is brisk without changing the charm. This is NY to the bone, love it or leave it.

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RE: My New York "Roadfood" diary - Sun, 01/15/06 8:36 AM
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quote:
Originally posted by cornfed

If you diss Yonah Schimmel's, you diss yourself. The best knishes in the world. Everything is superior. The sweet cheese knishes are heavenly. This is Jewish old school, the real thing just like Katz's if not more. Some of the above poster comments border on some other issue. Yonah is a destination place for any NYer with respect for tradition. Thankfully it has revived, due in large part to the newish Sunshine Theater. Business is brisk without changing the charm. This is NY to the bone, love it or leave it.


Take a chill pill, Phil. And make sure you know whereof you speak before you spout.
Let's try to keep this from getting ad hominem. I'm entitled to dislike knishes, and to find Yonah Schimmel's unappealing. And just by way of bona fides, my father was born on Rivington St, and I've lived within a short walk of Houston Street for the better part of forty years, and so I don't need a lecture about "respect for tradition", thanks.

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RE: My New York "Roadfood" diary - Sun, 01/15/06 10:48 AM
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There aren't hominy grits filled knishes, are there?
The Bear

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RE: My New York "Roadfood" diary - Sun, 01/15/06 11:15 AM
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I had my first knish ever this summer at Yonnah Schimmels. After ordering it, the guy took it, tossed it into a microwave, and then gave it to me.

Needless to say....the crust was soggy, the outside scalding hot, the inside cold.

I guess I can consider myself dissed.

Thank God I was able to walk a few steps away and get that awful taste out of my mouth with some smoked sable from Russ and Daughters.

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RE: My New York "Roadfood" diary - Sun, 01/15/06 12:22 PM
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quote:
Originally posted by ScreenBear

There aren't hominy grits filled knishes, are there?
The Bear


They go nice with a good ol' kosher ham n' cheese sangwich!

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RE: My New York "Roadfood" diary - Sun, 01/15/06 2:06 PM
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Scallion, starting off by saying a place stinks because you hate knishes is not much for logic. Something like Dreamland stinks because I hate bbq. That's inane and bullying. Check yourself before you use words you learned in Philosophy 101. Your loss. As for following a cop's culinary beat, stick to rat-chewed Dunkin' Donuts and Tad's. Food should always appeal to the intellect? Frustrated lawyer watching to much Law and Order?

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RE: My New York "Roadfood" diary - Sun, 01/15/06 4:15 PM
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quote:
BT Posted - 01/14/2006 : 19:56:33
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

quote:
Originally posted by fpczyz

Thank god BT didn't order a Knish




Uh, when I was walking from the F-line subway station at 2nd Ave. to Katz's I recall passing a place that advertised knishes in their window and I seriously though about getting one (potato if available). What horror would that have provoked?


BT now can you see the horror a Nish....... or Kin-nish can bring into this thread............
although the "K" is not silent, a native New Yorker will say it so fast that you will never hear the "K" it is a Nishhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh

wanderingjew
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RE: My New York "Roadfood" diary - Sun, 01/15/06 4:24 PM
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BT,

Enjoyed reading your thread...
Ya should have gone to the Carnegie! I still say it's the best!

The Travelin Man
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RE: My New York "Roadfood" diary - Sun, 01/15/06 4:40 PM
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quote:
Originally posted by fpczyz

BT now can you see the horror a Nish....... or Kin-nish can bring into this thread............
although the "K" is not silent, a native New Yorker will say it so fast that you will never hear the "K" it is a Nishhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh


I don't know who you are speaking with, but no one I know/knew has ever said "nish." Or for that matter, anyone whose dialect could be so confusing that you would think they were saying "nish."

cornfed
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RE: My New York "Roadfood" diary - Sun, 01/15/06 5:05 PM
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FP, perhaps you were in an Indian restaurant. Never, ever have I heard nish. Perhaps someone asked you, "Is this your niche?" You know, it is true they have them intellectuals up in the NYC.

sizz
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RE: My New York "Roadfood" diary - Sun, 01/15/06 5:34 PM
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you see BT I told you knish would bring out the worst in the old folks that prowl this web site looking for controversy

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RE: My New York "Roadfood" diary - Sun, 01/15/06 7:02 PM
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Sounds sooo good! I wish I has that type of food here.

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RE: My New York "Roadfood" diary - Sun, 01/15/06 7:37 PM
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quote:
Originally posted by cornfed

Scallion, starting off by saying a place stinks because you hate knishes is not much for logic. Something like Dreamland stinks because I hate bbq. That's inane and bullying. Check yourself before you use words you learned in Philosophy 101. Your loss. As for following a cop's culinary beat, stick to rat-chewed Dunkin' Donuts and Tad's. Food should always appeal to the intellect? Frustrated lawyer watching to much Law and Order?

I'll get right on that Philosophy 101 review.

Maybe, while I'm doing that, you can brush up on your Reading Comprehension skills, and then maybe on your manners.

I didn't say that it stinks because I don't like knishes. I said I don't like knishes, and that it stinks. What I learned in Philosophy is that what you inferred is post hoc, propter hoc. Look it up.

Similarly, the cop didn't tell me about eating there. He told me something he had seen there in the course of an investigation.

And belittling cops ... well, that, of course, must be something other than "inane and bullying". It's just ignorant.

Maybe I'll have to use smaller words when I post to you.

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RE: My New York "Roadfood" diary - Sun, 01/15/06 8:06 PM
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Whoa there, partner. It's only knishes. The best knishes, but knishes nevertheless.

ScreenBear
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RE: My New York "Roadfood" diary - Sun, 01/15/06 9:33 PM
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So this nice young couple who live in New York after getting married in the early 1920s pick Ratner's as their favorite restaurant. It's their place. They go all the time. For special occasions, just to get out, and any time at all.

And so it is for 10 years. Then, one early evening whilst they dined, the man's fish arrived; the wife's blintzes arrived. And just as the young man is about to cut into his fish, the fish comes to life and pleads: "Oh, please, don't eat me, don't eat me."

The man is freaked. His wife is shocked. They leave the restaurant. It's such a horror to the man that they never go to a restaurant again. The wife goes along with it.

That is, until a day or two before their 50th anniversary. The wife tiptoes around the subject. It would be nice to go out for dinner for their 50th.

The husband anticipates the event, and to show his appreciation for his wife's tolerance all these years, he broaches the subject first. "Tania," he says, "would you like to go out for dinner with me for our 50th anniversary?"

"Sure, Jack," she immediately answers. She knows her husband, and figured he'd come through for the big 5-0.

"Good," he says, but, would you mind terribly if we went to Wolfie's instead of Ratner's this time?"

"No, I wouldn't have it any other way, Jack. Wolfie's will be fine."

So they get decked out. The limo arrives. They go the few blocks to Wolfie's. Seated, she orders the blintzes; he orders the fish."

Their meals arrive. Her blintzes look cooked to perfection. His fish, beautifully delivered, is under a silver cover. He lifts the cover. And lo and behold, there's the fish. The fish pops up, looks at Jack and says, "What's the matter, you don't go to Ratner's any more?"

The Bear


cornfed
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RE: My New York "Roadfood" diary - Sun, 01/15/06 9:46 PM
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Now that's a joke.

BT
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RE: My New York "Roadfood" diary - Mon, 01/16/06 2:31 AM
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quote:
Originally posted by Bobs

Sounds sooo good! I wish I has that type of food here.


Bobs, New York has New York food and it can be wonderful, but Tennessee has their specialties too and they can also be wonderful. The one thing you probably do lack in a smaller community is the DENSITY of places. In a big city--New York and even my hometown of San Francisco, there's usually pretty good eating on every block and a variety of places within walking distance of most people's homes. But there's compensations for not living in a big city and I'll bet you know what they are better than most of us do.

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RE: My New York "Roadfood" diary - Mon, 01/16/06 2:37 AM
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quote:
Originally posted by cornfed

Whoa there, partner. It's only knishes. The best knishes, but knishes nevertheless.


True--and could we maybe move on to blintzes. That's another thing I didn't get while in NYC and probably should have (blueberry with sour cream, maybe or just plain cheese).

But most of us humans can only eat so much in a given period of time. I thought I was doing pretty well packing away a Katz's corned beef sandwich and 10 Dumpling House dumplings in the same afternoon. Then having a sizeable dinner.

BT
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RE: My New York "Roadfood" diary - Mon, 01/16/06 2:39 AM
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quote:
Originally posted by ScreenBear


And so it is for 10 years. Then, one early evening whilst they dined, the man's fish arrived; the wife's blintzes arrived.

The Bear




I should have read further--we HAVE moved on to blintzes.

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RE: My New York "Roadfood" diary - Tue, 01/17/06 3:37 PM
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quote:
Originally posted by cornfed

If you diss Yonah Schimmel's, you diss yourself. The best knishes in the world. Everything is superior. The sweet cheese knishes are heavenly. This is Jewish old school, the real thing just like Katz's if not more. Some of the above poster comments border on some other issue. Yonah is a destination place for any NYer with respect for tradition. Thankfully it has revived, due in large part to the newish Sunshine Theater. Business is brisk without changing the charm. This is NY to the bone, love it or leave it.


This is the kind of posting that soils internet boards the world over. I stated an opinion of a restaurant, one that I have been to literally hundreds of times, beginning when I was abut 3 years old, and this garbage gets posted in response. I said nothing vicious , nothing offensive and certainly nothing untrue. Makes me want to pull the plug in my internet connection.

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RE: My New York "Roadfood" diary - Tue, 01/17/06 9:23 PM
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So these two guys meet on the street. One says to the other, "Hey, didn't I meet you in Chicago?"

To which the other responds, "I've never been to Chicago."

The other fellow scratches his chin and then says, "You know, come to think of it, I've never been to Chicago either."

"Yeah, must have been two other guys," concludes the other.
The Bear

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RE: My New York "Roadfood" diary - Fri, 01/20/06 9:22 PM
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From The Mediator (microfilmed from 1917-1919; on the same reel as The Jewish Bakers’ Voice), 8 August 1919, pg. 12, col. 1:

“K” in Knisch as in Pigs’ Knuckles

It is pronounced, or, better, they are pronounced – k-nisches, the accent being smeared impartially over the k , as in the word k-nuckles, when used in connection with pigs’ knuckles.


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RE: My New York "Roadfood" diary - Wed, 06/21/06 6:06 PM
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quote:
Originally posted by BT


After a few hours in the Met and a walk across Central Park to the West Side, I subwayed down to 50th St. where, upon emerging from the station I decided to try a slice of pizza from Famiglia which bills itself as the “official pizza of the New York Yankees”. This is mass market pizza, no coal-fired ovens or any of that stuff here, but it was quite acceptable and I’d love having anything as good in Arizona.


Hi BT - not sure where you are in Arizona, but I know where some darned close to REAL N.Y. pizza is....I grew up in New York and after 25 years of searching for NY pizza - I FOUND IT!!! It is a little place in Tempe, AZ., Venezia's by name on the Southeast corner of Mill & Southern...in a small shopping center.

It is SOOOOOO very close, maybe needs a speck more oregano (just a speck, mind you) and go back to selling Coke products, NOT pepsi.

Just an fyi....and for anyone else in the metro-Phoenix area, I just saved you ALOT of looking.

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RE: My New York "Roadfood" diary - Wed, 06/21/06 11:37 PM
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I enjoyed the little food travelogue you posted. My family and I took a quick trip to NYC in April and we, too, sought out The Dumpling House. AWESOME! We were the first customers of the day and got there as they were making trays and trays of the dumplings. As we planned to eat lunch elsewhere, we decided to get 15 dumplings to share, as well as two orders of sesame pancake (50 cents each for huge pieces of fried sesame bread, filled with slivers of scallion). We went to the back counter to eat and, yes, it really does seat only 4 people. One of the coolest things about the location of the dumpling house is...as you stand facing the shop, if you look to your left, the Empire State Building stands clearly and triumphantly in the distance, perfectly framed by the buildings of this part of Chinatown.
It was a great morning for our family!

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RE: My New York "Roadfood" diary - Sat, 06/24/06 5:54 PM
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Oops. My bad. I meant the Chrysler Building, not the Empire State Building. I was expecting to find an indignant response to the mistake in my last post--I've been spared!


BT
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RE: My New York "Roadfood" diary - Wed, 06/28/06 4:17 AM
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Thanks azspots and Furgs. My AZ place is in Green Valley (20 miles south of Tucson). A little far to go to Tempe for pizza, but I appreciate your thoughts. I'm also glad someone else backs me up on the Dumpling House. But I'm curious--how did you discover them?