Welcome Back New Orleans!

Post
UncleVic
Sirloin
2006/01/11 22:33:35
Kitchens are starting to hum again down in the Big Easy..
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20060110/ts_nm/hurricanes_cooking_dc

improviser
Double Cheeseburger
RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/11 23:23:27
What a great idea. While there are so many little things that can never truly be replaced, these skillets will be put to good use, making true "comfort" food. I know that when I think of a cast iron skillet, I think of my great-grandmother, who used hers well into her nineties, providing great food and great memories for her clan. It's great that hurricane survivors will be able to use these pans to make new memories for their families.

New Orleans is coming back. It was wounded, hurt bad, but it wasn't killed.
sfcwoodret
Junior Burger
RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/12 08:46:38
We'll begin to enjoy it again around 2020.
BT
Filet Mignon
RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/12 12:03:25
"The Black Iron Skillet Project collects and distributes seasoned frying pans . . . ."

Long ago I read about people falsely claiming to be a Katrina victim in order to get in on the money the Feds were handing out. It seemed outrageous. But THIS is tempting . . . .
BT
Filet Mignon
RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/12 17:47:20
From today's Wall Street Journal:
quote:
Some live oaks have toppled, and many magnolias have died, but all the way to the French Quarter, the shops and restaurants are open, and people have come home.

There are crowds taking a number for po' boy sandwiches at Domilise's on Annunciation, locals lunching on shrimp remoulade and trout amandine at Galatoire's, and browsers examining the silver ice buckets at Lucullus Antiques on Chartres Street. The Camellia Club of New Orleans is holding its 66th annual show on Saturday; schools are opening; and plans are set for the Zulu and Rex parades on Mardi Gras, just seven weeks away. With supply short and demand strong, rents have soared. Real estate records are being set.


Shrimp remoulade at Galatoire's . . . oh my, oh my!
roossy90
Sirloin
RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/12 18:22:39
Ferdie at Mothers!
Yum!
lleechef
Sirloin
RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/13 02:34:39
John G with Debris at Mother's!
Double yum!

I love the idea of giving cast iron skillets away. How are you gonna make gumbo without cast iron? You're not! Kudos to the folks involved in this project.
azure
Hamburger
RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/13 11:12:06
quote:
Originally posted by BT

From today's Wall Street Journal:

quote:
Some live oaks have toppled, and many magnolias have died, but all the way to the French Quarter, the shops and restaurants are open, and people have come home.

There are crowds taking a number for po' boy sandwiches at Domilise's on Annunciation, locals lunching on shrimp remoulade and trout amandine at Galatoire's, and browsers examining the silver ice buckets at Lucullus Antiques on Chartres Street. The Camellia Club of New Orleans is holding its 66th annual show on Saturday; schools are opening; and plans are set for the Zulu and Rex parades on Mardi Gras, just seven weeks away. With supply short and demand strong, rents have soared. Real estate records are being set.


Shrimp remoulade at Galatoire's . . . oh my, oh my!


Oh my, Oh my, indeed. I, for one, will not wait until 2020. I'm headed down not only to enjoy Galatoire's (among many, many others), but with the hope that my dollars spent will help advance the repair of my beloved home town. There is no place like it, in heart or spirit, food or fancy, and that it will rise again is no surprise.
signman
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/13 12:11:29
Anybody know about the Camellia Grill?
sizz
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/13 13:05:05
I personally feel a bit uneasy about the Big Easy.............. perhaps it's psychological, but to me it will never be the same .. too many visuals in my memory from the freeeken TV reports of a city engulfed in a sewer back up.... mud, grime, the stench of living things no longer living and devastated people, angry people, greedy people, poor people .............. I for one lost my appetite for this great city and would rather continue living with the memory of what NO was............. let the Mississippi River take it's course.....
Michael Hoffman
Double-chop Porterhouse
RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/14 15:16:33
I know that many people are turned off by Emeril Lagasse, but he does do some mighty fine things.

NEW ORLEANS (AP) -- The little restaurant in an old store serves up some of the city's finest cuisine, but it isn't listed on the many tour guides that steer gourmets to the likes of Galatoire's or Commander's Palace. Still, in a city were food is a major interest, those in the know have discovered Cafe Reconcile and flock to it for what one customer calls "Southern cooking with New Orleans flair."

Started as an experiment in 2000, Cafe Reconcile works with teenagers in danger of being swallowed up by life on the streets, teaching them skills they need to work in the city's thriving restaurant industry. At the same time the nonprofit eatery was also fueling economic vitality and growth in the area and giving local folks a place to meet. ...

... Since the hurricane, the cafe has started a $1.5 million fundraising campaign to keep the program running and complete renovations. Among its supporters are Chef Emeril Lagasse, who has supported the restaurant through his foundation.

On a recent night he used a rare evening off from his restaurants to cook dinner for the police and fire fighters that work in the area, as well as local families and other guests. He also surprised restaurant officials with the announcement of a $25,000 donation.

"I just thought, 'Why wait?'" Lagasse said. "Everybody is waiting, some are forced to wait, but I would like to see things move ahead here."



For the complete story:

http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/K/KATRINA_TEEN_CAFE?SITE=FLTAM&SECTION=US
EliseT
Filet Mignon
RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/16 21:20:01
quote:
Originally posted by fpczyz

I personally feel a bit uneasy about the Big Easy.............. perhaps it's psychological, but to me it will never be the same .. too many visuals in my memory from the freeeken TV reports of a city engulfed in a sewer back up.... mud, grime, the stench of living things no longer living and devastated people, angry people, greedy people, poor people .............. I for one lost my appetite for this great city and would rather continue living with the memory of what NO was............. let the Mississippi River take it's course.....


When I saw the people lying in the gutters outside the convention center and realizing people were dying right on the exact spot where I caught beads, it was the worst feeling. But this is not the first disaster this city has seen. It was built on slavery, voodoo, crooked polititians, swamplands, floods, and cemetaries. It will come back.

I live in Los Angeles. Not too long ago I watched my city burned and looted. And we are doing just fine.
saps
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/16 21:34:00
I don't know if I'd use LA as an example. Out of over 300 metro areas, it is considered in the top 25 most dangerous.
BT
Filet Mignon
RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/16 22:03:53
quote:
Originally posted by fpczyz

I personally feel a bit uneasy about the Big Easy.............. perhaps it's psychological, but to me it will never be the same .. too many visuals in my memory from the freeeken TV reports of a city engulfed in a sewer back up.... mud, grime, the stench of living things no longer living and devastated people, angry people, greedy people, poor people .............. I for one lost my appetite for this great city and would rather continue living with the memory of what NO was............. let the Mississippi River take it's course.....


Coming from the "little boutique town" you love to deride which had what may have really been the worse natural disaster in US history (at least if measured by the number of dead--3000+) in 1906, I think they'll come back strong and I badly want them to. Like New Orleans, most of my home town was rubble and 6 years later it had been rebuilt completely and hosted a world's fair:



I think your attitude about this is pessimistic in the extreme.
EliseT
Filet Mignon
RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/17 23:41:33
quote:
Originally posted by saps

I don't know if I'd use LA as an example. Out of over 300 metro areas, it is considered in the top 25 most dangerous.


That's just cause I'm here

azure
Hamburger
RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/18 11:35:38
quote:
Originally posted by BT

quote:
Originally posted by fpczyz

I personally feel a bit uneasy about the Big Easy.............. perhaps it's psychological, but to me it will never be the same .. too many visuals in my memory from the freeeken TV reports of a city engulfed in a sewer back up.... mud, grime, the stench of living things no longer living and devastated people, angry people, greedy people, poor people .............. I for one lost my appetite for this great city and would rather continue living with the memory of what NO was............. let the Mississippi River take it's course.....


Coming from the "little boutique town" you love to deride which had what may have really been the worse natural disaster in US history (at least if measured by the number of dead--3000+) in 1906, I think they'll come back strong and I badly want them to. Like New Orleans, most of my home town was rubble and 6 years later it had been rebuilt completely and hosted a world's fair:



I think your attitude about this is pessimistic in the extreme.


Thanks for this, BT. I cannot comprehend the arguement that New Orleans should be wiped off the map because of this disaster. Quite the opposite, rebuilding and preserving is not only the right thing to do but it is a lesson for generations to come. Not everything can or should be thrown away. We'd lose a lot if we dismantled every place that was ever vulnerable to natural disaster.
azure
Hamburger
RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/18 11:39:48
And signman, Camellia Grill has not yet reopened...but everyone's hoping.
signman
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/18 17:23:35
Thanks azure, From the data I've seen, it appears Riverbend did not suffer as much flooding as other areas north and east, so I would have expected them to be open, but apparently there have been problems.
azure
Hamburger
RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/22 20:04:55
New Orleans update in today's New York Times travel section:

http://travel2.nytimes.com/2006/01/22/travel/22going.html?pagewanted=1&8td&emc=td
garryd451
Double Cheeseburger
RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/22 23:15:56
quote:
Originally posted by UncleVic

Kitchens are starting to hum again down in the Big Easy..
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20060110/ts_nm/hurricanes_cooking_dc




I don't know, the media is Saying great things are happeningg, then the next week, they're telling how bad it still is! Last week on the nightly news on one of the major 3 networks, they reported that more than 1/3 of the population of New Orleans may not return and that only 20% of the FEMA 20,000 FEMA Tempory Mobile Homes have been delivered, hooked up and moved into!

Then this week, the media is reporting all the good stuff tht is going on, down there, it be interesting to see what they report this week! Will it be "THE GOOD, THE BAD OR THE UGLY?"
Greymo
Filet Mignon
RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/23 08:28:02

Last week, I spoke with a woman who had just arrived home from spending 3 weeks in NO as part of a large volunteer group. For all it is worth, she was very pessimistic about the whole area. She said the one thing that was very difficult for all to endure was the overwhelming odor of mold which was every where. She said at least a third of her group came home ill.

Also interesting, was that they all went down and stayed in their own travel trailers. She said some of the volunteers that they spoke with were staying in hotels that still had broken windows.
Sundancer7
Fire Safety Admin
RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/23 09:01:47
I do not know the status of the FEMA mobile homes but I do know that I have been traveling interstates a lot recently and the roads are clogged with extra wide mobile homes traveling in convoys that block traffic. I understand this is necessary but I have seen hundreds of these hoomes on interstate.

They do not look very fancy but I am sure they are better than where some of these misplaced folks have been staying.

Paul E. Smith
Knoxville, TN
garryd451
Double Cheeseburger
RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/23 14:17:00
quote:
Originally posted by Sundancer7

I do not know the status of the FEMA mobile homes but I do know that I have been traveling interstates a lot recently and the roads are clogged with extra wide mobile homes traveling in convoys that block traffic. I understand this is necessary but I have seen hundreds of these hoomes on interstate.

They do not look very fancy but I am sure they are better than where some of these misplaced folks have been staying.

Paul E. Smith
Knoxville, TN


I don't know the status of the FEMA mobile homes either, by my post, I was just stating that it seems to me that we are getting alot of diiferent messages from the News Media on what is really happening down there!
1bbqboy
Filet Mignon
RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/24 09:55:40
This hits home, even though I've never been to New Orleans. "Doc" is a well known BB referee here in the Rogue Valley, and is known and loved by all.
He told us a few weeks ago he was going back down there, but I, didn't expect this bleak report....
http://www.mailtribune.com/archive/2006/0123/local/stories/01local.htm

Leroi Dedeaux says the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina still haunts his New Orleans family members, who are displaced and crammed together in homes without electricity.
Mail Tribune / Jim Craven
Still suffering Katrina’s wrath

A Rogue Valley man returns to New Orleans to help family members rebuild

By JOHN DARLING
for the Mail Tribune

His family had lived in New Orleans for almost a century. Now, after Hurricane Katrina, their homes are destroyed and their jobs gone. They are the Dedeaux clan, some 90 relatives of longtime Rogue Valley resident Leroi Dedeaux.

Dedeaux, membership director at the Ashland YMCA, started a fund at Washington Mutual in Ashland and collected more than $8,000 from local residents and friends he’d made in his 35 years here. Last month, he flew to New Orleans to pitch in — and to start writing checks to family members.

It helped. All his relatives now have food, water and a roof over their heads, although 11 are crammed in the house of his sister, Gwen, across the Mississippi River in Harvey, La. They’re sleeping on the floor, are living without electricity and have endured being told by both the Federal Emergency Management Agency and the American Red Cross first that they’d have to leave, then that they could stay, said Dedeaux, 55.

"You can see it (New Orleans) on TV, but once you’re there, it’s like nothing I ever experienced in my life," said Dedeaux, who grew up in the Ninth Ward, just east of downtown. "It’s so devastated, with cars and fridges thrown on top of houses and wild dogs circling you like they haven’t eaten in forever."

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Four months after Hurricane Katrina, Dedeaux had the unpleasant chore of finding a dead body "by locating the stench" and having it pulled out of debris by authorities, he said.

"How can I find a body unless they’re still dragging their feet and not really caring?" Dedeaux said. "They’ve made the devastation a tourist attraction and you see buses of people from all over the U.S. in there taking pictures."

Dedeaux’s relief fund went to help kin keep going with the basics of life, but none can relocate to their former homes, which were completely submerged and are contaminated, collapsed or completely gone, he said.

Many of his 90-member clan have relocated to nearby cities: Shreveport, Baton Rouge, Galveston, San Antonio, and also into Tennessee and North Carolina. His 93-year-old mother, whom he’d planned to bring back to his Talent home, was hospitalized with exhaustion and chest pains and was unable to travel.

The hardship in the wake of Hurricane Katrina has taken its toll on all his family, Dedeaux said. Much of his time during his 12 days in his sister’s crowded home was spent keeping the peace. His experience in New Orleans left him with enough post-traumatic stress that he’s getting therapy.

News reports of entrenched poverty, corruption and racism in New Orleans were no surprise to Dedeaux, who grew up with it and "had no question in my mind that it (the slow response to Katrina) was about racism," he said.

His relatives "don’t think about it because it’s all they know," he said. "They’re true Louisiana people. But I can see it because I got away."

Dedeaux came to the Rogue Valley in 1971, recruited for football at then-Southern Oregon College. He was defensive back, captain of the team and all-conference two years in a row, going on to a life connected with sports, including being a basketball referee with the Rogue Valley Officials Association.

"Sports is the only way a black person can get out of there. It’s not ‘Ozzie and Harriet’ down there. You have to work every day and night to survive," he said. "People say, well, why don’t you (his kin) go back there. They don’t know the hardship. There’s nothing to go back to."

An African-American, Dedeaux’s life in the mostly white Rogue Valley has been good to him, he said. "I’m a loving person and if they don’t make me feel black, I won’t make them feel white."

Dedeaux worked 14 years as manager of Geppetto’s Restaurant and has many friends and acquaintances who "have been unbelievable, opened their arms and bent over backwards" at the idea of sponsoring displaced relatives here. But, he said, "it’s like pulling teeth" to get them to imagine a new life elsewhere.

Dedeaux plans another trip back to help kin sometime in the next few months. His "New Orleans Family Relief Fund" is still receiving contributions at Washington Mutual, 243 E. Main St., Ashland OR 97520.


azure
Hamburger
RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/24 12:13:14
bv,
Doc's account is not dissimilar from the reports from my family in New Orleans. I just received devistating photos showing shells of homes in the middle of the street, artifacts of peoples lives strewn about like debris. It's absolutely gripping. Recovering from this side of Katrina's aftermath will take years. Thousands of lives and families are changed forever. The city will never be the same...rebuilt, perhaps, but never the same. And my heart is torn by the juxtaposition of celebratory restaurant openings for fortunate locals and hopeful tourists and what we all know is going on at the grass roots level. I don't know how to reconcile that. But I continue to hope and pray. And dream dreams that include fried oysters, french bread so light it could float away, and Galatoire's on a Thursday afternoon. Is that so wrong?
V960
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/24 17:16:18
NOLA not rebuilding? No way in hell. Adult Disney world WILL rebuild. Florence has been sinking and that tower in Piza has been leaning for HOW long.

OK, it's a bad location but the Hilton and Montelone alone are worth keeping. Not to mention Commander's Palace, Brennan's and K'Pauls.
the ancient mariner
Filet Mignon
RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/24 17:25:56
The labor shortage for restaurant help is overwhelming. The restaurants and shoppes may be open but with no help the waiting will be long and the preparation underwhelming. A rush to open may result in more harm than good.
sizz
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/28 19:56:37
The coach had put together the perfect team for the New Orleans Saints.
The only thing missing was a good quarterback. He had scouted all
the colleges and even the Canadian and European Leagues, but he
couldn't find a ringer who could ensure a Super Bowl victory.

Then one night, while watching CNN, he saw a war-zone scene in
Afghanistan. In one corner of the background, he spotted a young
Afghan Muslim soldier with a truly incredible arm. He threw a
hand-grenade straight into a window from 80 yards away. Then he
threw another from 50 yards down a chimney, and then hit a
passing car going 80 miles per hour.

I've got to get this guy!" coach said to himself. "He has the
perfect arm!"

So, he brings the young Afghan to the States and teaches him the
great game of football ...... and sure enough the Saints go on
to win the Super Bowl.

The young Afghan is hailed as a hero of football, and when the
coach asks him what he wants, all the young man wants to do is
call his mother.

"Mom," he says into the phone, "I just won the Super Bowl!"

"I don't want to talk to you," the old Muslim woman says. "You
deserted us. You are not my son!"

"Mother, I don't think you understand," pleads the son, "I've
just won the greatest sporting event in the world!"

"No! let me tell you," his mother retorts. "At this very moment
there are gunshots all around us. The neighborhood is a pile of
rubble. Your two brothers were beaten within an inch of their
lives last week, and I have to keep your sister in the house so
she doesn't get raped!"

The old lady pauses then tearfully says, " I will never forgive
you for making us move to New Orleans!"
BT
Filet Mignon
RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/28 21:47:17
quote:
Originally posted by the ancient mariner

The labor shortage for restaurant help is overwhelming. The restaurants and shoppes may be open but with no help the waiting will be long and the preparation underwhelming. A rush to open may result in more harm than good.


It's truly a chicken/egg situation: No reopening means no jobs which means no point in returning for a lot of people. Go ahead and reopen serving whatever sort of limited menu you have to to start putting people back to work. If there are good jobs, I think people will find a way to come back. I'll go to Mother's if all they offer is roast beef with debris gravy, Galatoire's no matter what they serve, K-Paul's as long as there's something with pecans in it on the menu. I really don't see how getting back to even limited business could do "more harm than good".

Meanwhile, fpczyz's description of New Orleans is, I think, a bit outdated. My guess is it's far safer right now than it used to be. Fair or not, most of the poor people, including those disposed to crime, have probably left town at least for now and the ratio of law enforcers to enforcees is much higher than it used to be.
BT
Filet Mignon
RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/28 22:03:47
quote:
Originally posted by azure

bv,
Doc's account is not dissimilar from the reports from my family in New Orleans. I just received devistating photos showing shells of homes in the middle of the street, artifacts of peoples lives strewn about like debris. It's absolutely gripping. Recovering from this side of Katrina's aftermath will take years. Thousands of lives and families are changed forever. The city will never be the same...rebuilt, perhaps, but never the same. And my heart is torn by the juxtaposition of celebratory restaurant openings for fortunate locals and hopeful tourists and what we all know is going on at the grass roots level. I don't know how to reconcile that. But I continue to hope and pray. And dream dreams that include fried oysters, french bread so light it could float away, and Galatoire's on a Thursday afternoon. Is that so wrong?


Of course it's not wrong. I don't see any painful juxtaposition here. Since the "War Between the States" (as it might be called down that way) wrecked the cotton and sugar economy, New Orleans has depended on tourism, oil and its port. The poorer folks depend on those businesses as much as the rich--either for jobs or for the tax money that pays for welfare. The oil industry suffered a lot of damage but with oil at record prices, that indistry is rapidly pulling itself together. The port is doing likewise more slowly. Its' tourism and peripheral industries like seafood that remain, as they say, under water. But if New Orleans is to rise, it'll be done by private industry resuming and finding there is money to be made which requires a work force which necessitates putting money into housing and all the other things. No matter what the Federal government has promised, they are already backing away from their promises and I doubt New Orleans will be rebuilt by government, but I do think it will be rebuilt as a somewhat smaller version of itself if government gets out of the way. By that I mean, cut out these stupid building moratoriums and red tape. Just let people do what they want to do with their own money and it'll come back as San Francisco and Chicago did in the last 2 centuries. Oh, and it might help if they elected somebody a little more competent and less divisive as Mayor.
azure
Hamburger
RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/28 22:47:41
Indeed, BT, some real leadership would certainly help. And I agree with your observations. I guess I just feel a little guilty -- getting excited about NOLA food itches (mine included) being scratched. In the midst of everything else going on.
azure
Hamburger
RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/28 22:56:52
As for New Orleans getting help from the US government:

New Orleans Feels Cast Adrift
Perception of Washington Indifference Compounds Despair
By Linton Weeks
Washington Post Staff Writer
Saturday, January 28, 2006; A10
NEW ORLEANS, Jan. 27 -- It has been an especially disheartening week for the people of New Orleans as they struggle to rebuild.
President Bush announced he would not support a popular plan for a government buyout of damaged houses. Word leaked that the White House had ignored e-mail warnings of Hurricane Katrina's potential danger in the 48 hours before the storm, including predictions of breached levees and massive flooding. Administration officials said they would not provide information to a Senate inquiry into the government's response to the hurricane.
Even Laura Bush raised ire during a visit to the area when she had this to say to local reporters about governmental relief: "I know it's very, very slow. That's how government works."
The combined effect, after five months of trying to clean up homes, reopen businesses and resurrect life here had people muttering, local commentators fuming and Louisiana officials furious.
Vickie Bassetti, 66, owner of Bassetti Fine Art Photographs in the French Quarter, said Friday that residents are feeling "more abandoned than ever" by official Washington. "The reality is being ignored or it's more than they are capable of coping with. . . . They have other agendas," she said.
Tulane University history professor Lawrence N. Powell said that Washington is treating New Orleanians "like we're some kind of Kleenex that you can just use and throw away." He said Washington does not seem to care that Louisiana supplies energy to, and receives river-carried waste from, a large part of the country. "Then they tell us we are stupid to live down here," he said.
He was especially annoyed by the first lady's comments about government's slow pace, saying, "It may work that way under Bush, but it didn't work that way under Lyndon Johnson."
Government leaders were angry about Bush's rejection of a plan by Rep. Richard H. Baker (R-La.) that would permit a government buyout of damaged properties.
"Administration officials do not understand the suffering of the people of Louisiana," Gov. Kathleen Babineaux Blanco (D) said in a statement this week.
Bush's decision, Sen. Mary Landrieu (D-La.) said on her Web site, "demonstrates a continued lack of understanding for the magnitude of the devastation and the immense rebuilding task our state faces."
She told the New Orleans Times-Picayune, "What we need is for our president to be our number one champion, not our number one obstacle."
Bush had promised to champion the city's rebuilding, the newspaper noted in an editorial this week. "The people of greater New Orleans took him at his word. But the president cannot make good on his promise until this region has the tools that it needs to recover. That hasn't happened yet, and time is wasting," the Times-Picayune said.
Eric Lewis, 38, a cement finisher, said: "They say the president has released money. I haven't seen any." Lewis owns several houses in the heavily ravaged Lower Ninth Ward. He was spending part of Friday checking out his Ford F-Super Duty truck. It had sat, untouched for months, among other now-junk cars and trucks and houses ruined by post-Katrina flooding.
He said he feels as abandoned as his truck: "I feel that for me and a whole lot of other people."
Burton E. Benrud Jr., one of the owners of the landmark Cafe du Monde, said, "Where are the FEMA maps?" The federally produced maps will determine what can be rebuilt and where.
"Why can't they issue those images right away so people can do what they need to do?" he asked. His voice had the tone of someone left behind by friends. "The longer they take doing it, the less chance that people will come back to the city to rebuild."
He said that "inertia and inaction" in Washington were making it impossible for many New Orleanians even to know where to start.
Bassetti said, "Why isn't everybody furious?" Furious about what? she was asked. "Furious about everything."
New Orleans has a tradition of operating independently. That isolation, said Powell, has created a distinctive culture and ethos. He added: "It's been a city born in neglect. It looks like it may expire from neglect."
BT
Filet Mignon
RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/29 12:27:34
I think it's worth emphasizing that the Federal government's proper and necessary role in this situation is to do things like get those FEMA maps done and get to work on an effective levee system. Failure to do those things certainly is and will impede the rebuilding process--people don't know where they an rebuild and don't want to put money into a New Orleans unprotected by levees. I don't want to get too partisan here, but it does seem as if the public (in New Orleans and nationally) could be getting more information about progress in those areas, assuming there is some.

On the other hand, I've thought from the day I first heard about it that Congressman Baker's plan to have the Feds buy up damaged property in New Orleans was a boondoggle that should go nowhere. It's simply not good economics or morally fair to give Americans the idea that the Federal government will always come along and bail them out of any kind of adversity. The Federal government doesn't have enough money to do that--it already has a huge debt load and an annual deficit. And if people assume they will be bailed out, they will do stupid things--like building in spots almost certain to be wiped out eventually by floods, hurricanes and, yes, earthquakes. Regrettably, the people of New Orleans could have and should have seen this coming. Anyone who has spent any time there and read the Times-Picayune has probably read pre-Katrina stories about the threat of flooding the city was under. So anybody who owned property there and didn't buy flood insurance has no moral right to ask for a bailout IMHO. I certainly buy earthquake insurance in CA (and flood insurance in AZ where rare torrential summer downpours can bring flash floods down the mountainsides).

An appropriate program of rebuilding demands (1) that government mitigate the hazards as much as possible (FEMA maps, levees etc) and (2) that people put their private money to work with a realistic understanding of the risks (future flooding and so on) and potential rewards (aside from the pleasure of living in a place like New Orleans pre-Katrina, there's money to be made in the triad of oil, the port and tourism). But my own assessment is that if government does do its part, the risks are controllable (through engineering and insurance) enough and the rewards great enough that New Orleans WILL be rebuilt rapidly. I do think, however, it's time for those in high office to stop whining and squabbling and get to work removing obstacles.
garryd451
Double Cheeseburger
RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/29 12:49:56
quote:
Originally posted by BT

I think it's worth emphasizing that the Federal government's proper and necessary role in this situation is to do things like get those FEMA maps done and get to work on an effective levee system. Failure to do those things certainly is and will impede the rebuilding process--people don't know where they an rebuild and don't want to put money into a New Orleans unprotected by levees. I don't want to get too partisan here, but it does seem as if the public (in New Orleans and nationally) could be getting more information about progress in those areas, assuming there is some.

On the other hand, I've thought from the day I first heard about it that Congressman Baker's plan to have the Feds buy up damaged property in New Orleans was a boondoggle that should go nowhere. It's simply not good economics or morally fair to give Americans the idea that the Federal government will always come along and bail them out of any kind of adversity. The Federal government doesn't have enough money to do that--it already has a huge debt load and an annual deficit. And if people assume they will be bailed out, they will do stupid things--like building in spots almost certain to be wiped out eventually by floods, hurricanes and, yes, earthquakes. Regrettably, the people of New Orleans could have and should have seen this coming. Anyone who has spent any time there and read the Times-Picayune has probably read pre-Katrina stories about the threat of flooding the city was under. So anybody who owned property there and didn't buy flood insurance has no moral right to ask for a bailout IMHO. I certainly buy earthquake insurance in CA (and flood insurance in AZ where rare torrential summer downpours can bring flash floods down the mountainsides).

An appropriate program of rebuilding demands (1) that government mitigate the hazards as much as possible (FEMA maps, levees etc) and (2) that people put their private money to work with a realistic understanding of the risks (future flooding and so on) and potential rewards (aside from the pleasure of living in a place like New Orleans pre-Katrina, there's money to be made in the triad of oil, the port and tourism). But my own assessment is that if government does do its part, the risks are controllable (through engineering and insurance) enough and the rewards great enough that New Orleans WILL be rebuilt rapidly. I do think, however, it's time for those in high office to stop whining and squabbling and get to work removing obstacles.



The Federal Goverment opened a can of worms years ago, as far as who do who give aid to and who do your baul out!

I talking about two things:

1. When we started to send aid to every Country in the world when they have a flood, mud slid, Hurrican, etc., etc., and etc.

2. Whe the Federal Goverment bailed out Chrysler.

After these two things happened, it is goinmg to be very hard for the Federal Goverment to say no to anyone!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
azure
Hamburger
RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/30 00:49:04
Well, it certainly sounds like we've moved into a political discussion and I had not intended to head in that direction. However, I will say this...promises made should be promises kept. But it sure seems like time's a wastin' while the government and its greedy friends figure out who's ultimately going to profit from this. Whether folks had flood/wind insurance is not the issue.
It would be nice to see a little humanitarian aid at home...but then there are wars to be fought, Mars to be explored, ad nauseum.
BearHit
Hamburger
RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/30 07:33:43
Many areas are hit each year by Hurricanes and Tornadoes...

I don't recall any one city whining and throwing the "race card" as much as New Orleans has.

Granted Rita and Katrina were devastating - but I don't hear Mississippians crying nearly as much...

And yet the Govt is just as slow in the relief effort there...
1bbqboy
Filet Mignon
RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/30 09:00:16
quote:
Originally posted by BearHit

Many areas are hit each year by Hurricanes and Tornadoes...

I don't recall any one city whining and throwing the "race card" as much as New Orleans has.

Granted Rita and Katrina were devastating - but I don't hear Mississippians crying nearly as much...

And yet the Govt is just as slow in the relief effort there...

Let me ask you bearhit, if your only asset is gone, you own the land but have minimal income, who would you ask for help? Is a Bank going to give you a loan?
Are you really saying they're whining?
Remind me never to call out for a life preserver from you.
Trent, it appears, is a bit more realistic about the lack of motion...
PASCAGOULA, MISS. - Four days after Hurricane Katrina flattened 65,000 Gulf Coast homes, President Bush promised that at least one would rise from the rubble.

Where Republican Sen. Trent Lott's 154-year-old home once stood, the president said, "There's going to be a fantastic house. And I'm going to look forward to sitting on the porch."

Not only is there no porch almost five months later, but Lott's house on Beach Boulevard is nothing but a concrete slab and a neat stack of bricks.

Lott, counting himself fortunate to own two other homes far from the destruction, said he is tired of hearing that he and his neighborhood might get some sort of special favors.

Lott's neighborhood is a narrow enclave, stretching about half a mile along the coast and only two or three blocks inland.

In this working-class city of 26,000 that is anchored at one end by the Northrop Grumman shipyards and giant chemical companies at the other, the area was a small island of affluence.

The homes looked out on the beach, with deep lawns, impeccable gardens and in many cases, entrances marked by grand columns.

But as the months go by with no relief, Lott and his neighbors are voicing the same frustrations as thousands of other families around the hurricane-ravaged region.

"The government is not going to rebuild my house," said Lott. "I don't even have a FEMA trailer."

Critical of efforts
Lott, a 37-year veteran of Capitol Hill, made no secret of his disdain for federal emergency efforts in his state in the early weeks after the Aug. 29 hurricane.

He blasted the Federal Emergency Management Agency's "attitude problem" and excessive bureaucracy. He said the agency's former director, Michael Brown, was in over his head.

Lott praised corporations that brought generators and supplies to Mississippi hours after the hurricane, wondering why the private sector could get through when the government could not.

Lott, a longtime foe in Washington, D.C., of "frivolous" lawsuits, was no less critical of insurance companies that balked at paying claims to Mississippi homeowners.

And he didn't hesitate to file suit against a company he once defended, State Farm Fire & Casualty Co.

"Funny how frivolous lawsuits stop being frivolous when it's you," said Lott's brother-in-law, Richard Scruggs, who is representing the senator.

Brought political boost
Lott said he was in Alabama promoting his new autobiography when the hurricane struck. He said his wife, Tricia, called the next day to say their house — valued at more than $750,000 — was gone.

"I said, 'What do you mean, gone?' " Lott said. "She said, 'Gone, as in: does not exist any more.' "

Two days after the storm, Lott set off to survey the damage caused by the storm. When he and his wife arrived at the remains of the house, they wrapped their arms around the big, old oak tree in what used to be their backyard and had a good cry.

"This hurricane was a great equalizer," Lott said here last week. "People with big houses lost everything they had. People with little houses lost everything, too."

Last month, the Senate approved a $29 billion aid package for hurricane relief. Lott said he had to "get agitated" with some of his colleagues to make them understand the severity of Mississippi's suffering.

In an odd way, however, the hurricane helped boost Lott's political fortunes. He is hugely popular here, receiving higher polling numbers than any other Southern senator. But when he lost his Senate majority leadership position in 2003 after praising Strom Thurmond's 1948 segregationist campaign for the presidency, newspaper editorials in his home state pilloried him.

Katrina, he said, has given him a new bond with voters: "They know I am not just pontificating. They know I lost my home, too."
http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/nation/3620022.html
"Funny how frivilous lawsuits stop being frivilous when they're you." how true.
1bbqboy
Filet Mignon
RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/30 09:32:48
I'll add this without comment:
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/c/a/2006/01/30/MNGO7GVLK41.DTL

Developers of a tract in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta east of Mount Diablo don't worry that the land is 6 feet below sea level and kept dry by a system of pumps and aging levees not considered adequate for urban growth.

They have begun building new, privately funded earthen levees within the existing dikes that would allow for as many as 5,200 new houses on the Hotchkiss Tract. And the booming Contra Costa city of Oakley is eager to annex the growth into its borders.

Driven by the demand for new housing from the Bay Area to Sacramento, tens of thousands of homes are planned on land that state and federal officials say is among the most threatened with catastrophic flooding in the nation. In Oakley and elsewhere, developers and city officials claim the new levees will protect people far better than existing levees, which California's political leaders say are crumbling.

"It's like comparing a brand new Mercedes with a horse cart,'' said Rebecca Willis, Oakley's director of community development. "Levees today are structurally sound. Levees built 100 years ago were not.''

But critics including state officials, environmentalists and academics say that urbanizing such floodplains is unwise, even madness, particularly after Hurricane Katrina broke through federally certified levees in New Orleans.

"I think it is just insane that we would be building houses below sea level,'' said Mathias Kondolf, who is organizing a conference on delta development this spring at UC Berkeley, where he is an associate professor of environmental planning.

State elected officials and bureaucrats are worried about the potential economic and social effects of a levee failure next to new developments or existing urban areas in the delta and other parts of the state, particularly the Central Valley. They are considering selling bonds to fund levee improvements, better mapping of risk zones and requiring all homeowners behind levees to have flood insurance, among other measures.

Developers are unapologetically turning to flood-prone lands, particularly in the delta, as the Bay Area's urban footprint expands eastward. Nearly 40,000 homes that could get flooded if a levee failed are planned in the cities of Lathrop (San Joaquin County), Oakley and Stockton alone.

"Many opportunities for development lie in areas protected by levees,'' said Don Hofer, a vice president for Shea Homes of Northern California, which has started building the first of 1,330 homes approved on Hotchkiss Tract.

As with other development in flood areas, the project will feature artificial lakes to capture storm water. "Waterfront'' homes will cost as much as $800,000.

Hofer and other building industry representatives say the flood threat to new development is being distorted and oversold. New development will improve flood protection on Hotchkiss Tract, he said, because local officials have required builders to construct interior levees that at least meet the federal "100-year flood'' standard -- the level thought to protect against a storm that has a 1 percent chance of occurring in any year.

The new levees there will be taller, wider and better engineered than the old ones, with dirt pounded down to create the strength to withstand earthquakes, Hofer said, although critics say the threat of quakes has not been given enough attention.

Hofer said just his company's development alone will also provide $3.8 million over 30 years through assessments to help improve and maintain the old levees on the tract, though it is not expected that those levees will provide 100-year protection to the tract's 544 existing residences. Many of those structures do not have ground-floor living areas and some are on stilts.

State officials, who have little authority over local land use, say the federal flood standard is inadequate, and they want all urban areas to have levees that provide at least 200-year flood protection. With climate change, storms getting larger and sea levels rising, they say, the flood danger appears to be increasing.

Large existing urban areas, including much of Sacramento, don't meet the 100-year threshold, and state and federal remapping efforts will probably reveal others, said Ricardo Pineda, chief of floodplain management for the state Department of Water Resources. If local governments cannot prove that critical levees are worthy of certification, existing urban areas could be added to the floodplain maps, he said.

A 2005 report by the agency said much of the development planning in the Central Valley has been "based on poor and outdated information regarding the seriousness of the flood threat.'' Many flood maps used by decisionmakers are old and inaccurate; others assumed existing levees provided 100-year flood protection when they probably do not, the report concluded.

Dave Chan, a resident of South Sacramento for more than two decades, says his neighborhood needs more flood protection, but he doesn't worry about it. He knows local officials are working to strengthen the levees.

"You live by the river, you're aware of it,'' said Chan, who has flood insurance. "I just don't pay attention after a while.''

Some developers in Lathrop and Stockton -- which has been adding about 3,000 homes a year, primarily below surrounding waters -- are building new levees or raising existing ones to levels they say will protect against catastrophic flooding.

Developers of the 11,000-home River Islands development on an island called Stewart Tract in Lathrop say their project will lower the threat of flooding to the rest of the city by moving existing levees and widening flood channels. "We think what we are doing is exemplary,'' said Susan Dell'Osso, River Islands' project director, who estimated predevelopment costs so far have topped $80 million.

But the city of Lathrop has also approved nearly 9,000 other homes behind levees that the state water agency warned in 2003 appeared to be inadequate for protecting an urban area. Those levees are federally certified as meeting the 100-year criteria, but in 1997 they had problems with seepage; as much as 2 feet of water collected on the ground and residents were evacuated, Pineda said.

"We think those levees have problems, and we don't see the city of Lathrop addressing those issues at this point,'' he said. City Manager Pam Carder said other experts disagreed but the city set development back far enough to allow for future levee improvements.

On Hotchkiss Tract, the plan is for developers to remove land from the federal floodplain by building dry levees inside existing levees. Those levees will be turned over to Reclamation District 799, which now has only two full-time employees and a budget of $186,000. Assessments on new homes are expected to generate $3.8 million for improvements to the exterior levee system -- although they will not be brought up to the 100-year level because existing homes are in the way.

Reclamation district Chairman Joe Spotts, a resident for 35 years who owns a boat brokerage, repair and supply business, said he is confident the development plan will work, and thinks it will help the local economy. In addition to the Hotchkiss Tract, the city of Oakley is processing plans for 1,400 more homes nearby, in the current floodplain. "We've been living behind these levees for many, many, many years, and failures have been very minor,'' he said.

For large-scale developers, it is highly desirable that levees be federally certified and that nearby land not appear on federal flood maps. Homes in floodplains cannot have ground-floor living space and buyers must carry national flood insurance in order to get a federally backed mortgage.

But not appearing on a floodplain map does not eliminate the potential for flooding, as was illustrated in New Orleans where levees that exceeded the 100-year flood standards failed, said Peter Rabbon, executive director of the state Reclamation Board, which cooperates with agencies of federal, state and local governments in establishing, planning, constructing, operating, and maintaining flood control works.

Anxiety among state officials about the cost of property damage due to flooding increased greatly after a court held two years ago that the state was liable for flooding that resulted from the failure of a levee in Yuba County in 1986. Last year, the state paid $450 million to Yuba County property owners who suffered damage from the 1986 floods, and an additional $50 million for flood damage in 1997.

The Yuba County levee that failed was part of a 1,600-mile system of state-supervised levees along the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers and their tributaries that today protect 500,000 people, 200,000 structures and $54 billion worth of property. There are 800 miles of delta levees the state does not manage.

In June 2004, a levee failed unexpectedly in dry weather on the Upper Jones Tract in San Joaquin County, flooding 12,000 acres of farmland.

Some federal reimbursement is expected, but the state has spent $50 million dealing with the disaster, which disabled for two months the pumps in Tracy that ship water to urban and agricultural users south.

"The state is saying it's not going to do that anymore,'' said state Sen. Michael Machado, D-Linden (San Joaquin County), one of the principal authors of legislation to sell state bonds that would in part pay for levee repairs.

"I advise everybody to get flood insurance.''

Sundancer7
Fire Safety Admin
RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/30 09:44:14
Bill Voss: I do not think I would want to live there.

Paul E. Smith
Knoxville, TN
BT
Filet Mignon
RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/01/30 12:51:24
quote:
Originally posted by bill voss

I'll add this without comment:

Developers of a tract in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta east of Mount Diablo don't worry that the land is 6 feet below sea level and kept dry by a system of pumps and aging levees not considered adequate for urban growth.

They have begun building new, privately funded earthen levees within the existing dikes that would allow for as many as 5,200 new houses on the Hotchkiss Tract. And the booming Contra Costa city of Oakley is eager to annex the growth into its borders.

Driven by the demand for new housing from the Bay Area to Sacramento, tens of thousands of homes are planned on land that state and federal officials say is among the most threatened with catastrophic flooding in the nation. In Oakley and elsewhere, developers and city officials claim the new levees will protect people far better than existing levees, which California's political leaders say are crumbling.



I don't know why you chose not to comment, but I had previously read this in the SF Chronicle and just shook my head. Folks who live around here (Bay Area) are pretty much aware (or ought to be) of the potential for flooding in the Sacramento delta and anybody who buys a house on a levee-protected delta island is taking a huge risk that they should be aware of and they should be prepared to suffer a loss if and when . . . . That's why I don't think it's reasonable for New orleans homeowners who could have bought flood insurance (that may not be all of them) and chose not to should be bailed out. I also think it can't happen because, like I said, the Feds just don't have enough money to do that for every natural disaster and it seems to me unfair to bail out New Orleanians and not do it for every vicitm of tornado, earthquake, hurricane or flood.

But the bottom line is the concept called "moral hazard". That says that if people think they will get bailed out, they will do stupid things they might not do if they believe the risk is all on them. To get concrete, if the Feds buy up the destroyed houses of New Orleans, I predict that more than one person who is thinking about one of those Sacto delta houses will think, "Well, it might get flooded, but the Federal government will buy it if that happens" and proceed with a purchase they might not otherwise make. I don't want that to happen--and remember, I'm someone who owns an expensive chunk of earthquake country.
Skillets
Junior Burger
RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/02/11 23:20:07
Hi and Happy Mardi Gras from New Orleans!

I'd like to thank you all for your interest in the Black Iron Skillet Project and assure you that it is for real. I am not just collecting them for myself! LOL First, (and shhhhhh) I have never aquired a fond affection for the tool although I have a wonderful appreciate for a cook who can use one. Second, how many skillets can one woman use, anyway? :) So, please don't be afraid to season a skillet and send it down or contact me for an address of an evacuee in another part of the country who needs one. You can find our mailing address and more information here http://www.synergysportsmarketing.com/skillets.html

Also, please don't wait until 2020 to come visit. Tourism is our mainstay and without it, we won't bounce back nearly as quickly. Both the good and the bad stories that you hear are true. There is a full and complete spectrum of situations. There are both people living out of their cars or in tents and getting food from the Red Cross trucks and then there are the debutants who are counting the Austraillian crystals on their ermine-trimmed gowns before their party. There are areas where the lights are on and most people are open for business and there are places where there are still houses across the road. The good areas are really (considering it all) good and the bad places are horrible. Come and see both.

One thing that we can all agree on is that our food and culture sets us apart from any other city in the world. You can all come down and enjoy that right now. Our streets are safe. The water is gone. You can see as much or as little of the good stuff or the devastation as you want. Our post-Katrina menus are a little different - generally the front of one piece of 8 1/2 x 11 paper and we may or may not have everything on it that day. You mouth will have a party with whatever we do have. Our hours of operation are a little different too, but that will give you more time to help someone clean out their house or party on Bourbon Street. You can do either or both; our city is full of all sorts of opportunities!

Please do come down... visit K-Pauls, eat a po-boy, have some of Mother's bread pudding, grab some boiled shrimp, some Abita beer, and go sit by the lake and enjoy the view. Come visit! And bring a seasoned skillet with you!

Gale Marie Abbass
Organizer
Black Iron Skillet Project - from one cook to another
roossy90
Sirloin
RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/02/12 13:28:12
Rather have a Ferdie at Mothers!
Its nice to hear things are coming along, albeit, slowly.
Good luck on your mission with the skillets!
Tara
UncleVic
Sirloin
RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/02/12 13:36:14
Thanks for the report Gale! Great project you have going there, and I'm sure theres many a cook out there that appreciates it...
V960
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/02/12 17:20:58
I've been there a number of times since the disaster and may I recommend a Glock? The place is a God awful mess and many not so nice folks are wandering about. Do what you want but it is still a dangerous place.
tsores
Double Cheeseburger
RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/02/12 17:58:30
quote:
Originally posted by signman

Anybody know about the Camellia Grill?


I just phoned and the number is disconnected. Not a good sign. Does anyone know what's up down there?
sizz
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/02/13 11:47:03
New Orleans?? .ah sorry, I'm giving up chocolate for lent........
tsores
Double Cheeseburger
RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/02/15 17:50:54
New Orleans restaurant update

Not yet open:

Mandina's. Deep flooding requires total gutting, but the building will survive. No word as to when the Canal Street favorite will reopen. Mandina's of Baton Rouge will open shortly in what had been Chalet Brandt.
Commander's Palace. A great deal of water got in through the roof and penetrated the walls, and the more they dug into the building the more damage they found. The place was almost gutted inside. The projected opening date is late March or early April.
Pascal's Manale. The mold remediation is finished. A foot and a half of water requires much renovation, though. Bob DeFelice says they will reopen sometime shortly after Mardi Gras.
Bruning's. Everything in West End Park was completely obliterated by Hurricane Katrina; all that's left is pilings. Sam Urrate, fourth-generation owner of Bruning's, says that he would like to reopen at West End or somewhere else. However, my feeling is that the kind of building that would have to be constructed in order to get insurance at West End would be so expensive that a casual seafood restaurant like Bruning's would probably not be viable. I do hope this old classic makes it back to life, though. Who knows?

Camellia Grill. I have not been able to reach anyone there, but they've have their pink Health Department card for some time.


NOW OPEN

FRENCH QUARTER
Angeli. 1141 Decatur. 566-0077. Pizza. Pasta. Italian.
Annette's. 219 Dauphine. 529-5741 . Breakfast. Neighborhood Cafe.
»Antoine's. 713 St. Louis. 581-4422. Classic Creole.
»Arnaud's. 813 Bienville. 523-5433. Classic Creole.
Attiki. 230 Decatur. 587-3756. Mediterranean.
»Bacco. 310 Chartres. 522-2426. Italian.
»Bayona. 430 Dauphine. 525-4455. Eclectic.
»Begue's. 300 Bourbon. 553-2278. Contemporary Creole.
»Bombay Club. 830 Conti. 586-0972. Contemporary Creole.
»Bourbon House. 144 Bourbon. 522-0111. Seafood.
»Broussard's. 819 Conti. 581-3866. Classic Creole.
Bubba Gump's Shrimp Company. 429 Decatur. 522-5800. Seafood.
Cafe Beignet. 311 Bourbon. 525-2611. Sandwiches.
»Cafe du Monde. 800 Decatur. 525-4544. Coffee.
»Cafe Giovanni. 117 Decatur. 529-2154. Italian.
»Cafe Gumbolaya. 1000 N Peters. 523-7418. Creole. Seafood.
»Cafe Maspero. 601 Decatur. 523-6250. Sandwiches.
Cafe Pontalba. 546 St. Peter. 522-1180. Creole.
»Central Grocery. 923 Decatur. 523-1620. Sandwiches.
Chartres House Cafe. 601 Chartres. 586-8383. Creole.
»Coffee Pot. 714 St. Peter. 524-3500. Creole.
»Coop's Place. 1109 Decatur. 525-9053. Creole. Cajun.
»Court of Two Sisters. 613 Royal. 522-7273. Classic Creole.
Courtyard Deli. 1113 Decatur. 412-8813. Sandwiches.
»Crescent City Brewhouse. 527 Decatur. 522-0571. Brewpub. Creole. Sandwiches. Seafood.
Desire Oyster Bar. 300 Bourbon. 586-0300. Seafood
Embers Steak House. 700 Bourbon. 523-1485. Steak. Seafood. Creole
Fiorella's. 1136 Decatur. 528-9566. Neighborhood Cafe. Breakfast.
Frank's. 933 Decatur. 525-1602. Italian. Sandwiches.
French Market Restaurant. 1001 Decatur. 525-7879. Seafood. Creole.
»Galatoire's. 209 Bourbon. 525-2021. Classic Creole.
»Gumbo Shop. 630 St. Peter. 525-1486. Classic Creole.
»GW Fins. 808 Bienville. 581-3467. Seafood.
»Hillery's. 827½ Toulouse. 571-2888. Contemporary Creole.
House of Blues. 225 Decatur. 529-2583. American. Creole.
»Irene's Cuisine. 539 St. Philip. 529-8811. Italian.
Jimmy Buffett's Margaritaville Cafe. 1104 Decatur. 592-2565. Bar. American.
»Johnny's Po-Boys. 511 St. Louis. 524-8129. Sandwiches.
»K-Paul's Louisiana Kitchen. 416 Chartres. 524-7394. Cajun.
La Louisiane. 725 Iberville. 378-8200. Creole.
Landry's Seafood House. 400 N. Peters. 558-0038. Concept Restaurant. Seafood.
»Louisiana Bistro. 337 Dauphine. 525-3335. Contemporary Creole.
»Meauxbar. 942 N. Rampart. 569-9979. Eclectic.
Mena's Palace. 200 Chartres. 525-0217. Neighborhood Cafe. Creole.
»Mona Lisa. 1212 Royal. 522-6746. Pizza. Middle Eastern.
»Muriel's. 801 Chartres. 568-1885. Contemporary Creole.
»Napoleon House. 500 Chartres. 524-9752. Sandwiches.
»Nola. 534 St. Louis. 522-6652. Contemporary Creole.
Oceana Grill. 739 Conti. 525-6002 . Seafood
Olivier's Creole Restaurant. 204 Decatur. 525-7734. Creole. Seafood.
Original Pierre Maspero's. 440 Chartres. 524-8990. Sandwiches. Creole. Cajun.
Orleans Grapevine. 720 Orleans Avenue. 523-1930. Wine Bar. Creole.
Paillard's. 717 Orleans (Bourbon Orleans Hotel). 571-4600. Creole. Breakfast.
Palm Court. 1204 Decatur. 525-0200. Creole.
Pere Antoine. 741 Royal. 581-4478. Creole.
»Peristyle. 1041 Dumaine. 593-9535. Contemporary Creole
»Petunia's. 817 St. Louis. 522-6440. Neighborhood Cafe.
»Philip Chan's Asian-Cajun Bistro. 301 Decatur. 522-4964. Chinese. Fusion.
»Port of Call. 838 Esplanade. 523-0120. Hamburgers.
Ralph & Kacoo's. 519 Toulouse. 522-5226. Seafood.
»Red Fish Grill. 115 Bourbon. 598-1200. Seafood.
»Remoulade. 309 Bourbon. 523-0377. Creole.
»Rib Room. 621 St. Louis. 529-7045. Contemporary Creole.
Samurai. 239 Decatur. 525-9595. Japanese. Sushi Bar.
»Stanley. 1031 Decatur. 593-0006. Neighborhood Cafe.
Star Steak & Lobster. 237 Decatur. 525-6151. Steak.
The Alpine. 620 Chartres. 523-3005. Creole.
»Tony Moran's. 240 Bourbon. 523-3181. Creole Italian.
»Tujague's. 823 Decatur. 525-8676. Classic Creole.
»Zydeque. 808 Iberville. 565-5520. Barbecue.

LEE CIRCLE-JACKSON AVENUE AREA
»Cafe Reconcile. 1631 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd. 568-1157. Creole. Neighborhood Cafe.
»Halpern's Home Furnishing Store Cafe. 1600 Prytania. 566-1707. Salads. Soups. Sandwiches.
Melting Pot. 1820 St. Charles Ave. 525-3225. Fondue.
»Ohi'a. 2 Lee Circle (in Hotel Le Cirque). 528-2205. Asian. Tapas.
Please-U. 1751 St. Charles Ave.. 525-9131. Neighborhood Cafe.
»Slice. 1513 St. Charles Ave. 525-7437. Pizza.
»Taqueros Coyoacan. 1432 St. Charles Ave. 525-9996. Mexican.
»Tokyo Bistro. 1612 St. Charles Ave. 581-4449. Japanese. Sushi Bar.
Trolley Stop Cafe. 1923 St. Charles Ave. 523-0090. Sandwiches.
»Zea. 1525 St. Charles Ave. 520-8100. Rotisserie. Eclectic.
OLD METAIRIE
»Galley Seafood. 2535 Metairie Rd. 832-0955. Seafood.
»Great Wall. 2023 Metairie Rd. 833-2585. Chinese.
»La Thai Cuisine. 933 Metairie Road. 828-3080. Thai.
»Radosta's. 249 Aris Ave. 831-1537. Sandwiches.
»Sun Ray Grill. 619 Pink. 837-0055. Creole. Eclectic.
»Taj Mahal. 923-C Metairie Rd. 836-6859. Indian.
»Vega Tapas Cafe. 2051 Metairie Rd. 836-2007. Mediterranean.
UPTOWN (Above Jackson, Below Audubon Park)
»Alberta. 5015 Magazine. 891-3015. French Bistro.
August Moon. 3635 Prytania. 899-5129. Chinese.
»Bluebird Cafe. 3625 Prytania. 895-7166. Breakfast.
»Byblos. 3218 Magazine. 894-1233. Lebanese.
Cannon's. 4141 St. Charles Ave. 891-3200. American.
»Casamento's. 4330 Magazine. 895-9761. Seafood.
»Clancy's. 6100 Annunciation. 895-1111. Classic Creole.
Crepes A La Cart. 1039 Broadway. 866-2362. Crepes.
»Dick & Jenny's. 4501 Tchoupitoulas. 894-9880. Contemporary Creole.
Domilese's. 5240 Annunciation. 899-9126. Sandwiches.
Fat Harry's. 4330 St. Charles Ave. 895-9582. Sandwiches.
Felix's Uptown. 4938 Prytania. 895-1330. Seafood. Oyster Bar.
»Flaming Torch. 737 Octavia. 895-0900. French Creole Bistro.
Franky & Johnny's. 321 Arabella. 899-9146. Neighborhood Cafe.
Igor's Garlic Clove. 2135 St. Charles Ave. 522-6602. Creole. Seafood.
»Joey K's. 3001 Magazine. 891-0997. Neighborhood Cafe.
»Juan's Flying Burrito. 2018 Magazine. 569-0000. Mexican.
»Kyoto. 4920 Prytania. 891-3644. Japanese.
»La Crepe Nanou. 1410 Robert. 899-2670. French Bistro.
»La Petite Grocery. 4238 Magazine. 891-3377. American.
»Lilette. 3637 Magazine. 895-1636. French.
»Martinique. 5908 Magazine. 891-8495. French Caribbean.
Nacho Mamas. 3242 Magazine. 899-0031. Mexican.
»Nardo's Trattoria. 6078 Laurel. 895-9441. Italian.
New York Pizza. 5201 Magazine. 891-2376. Pizza.
Nile Cafe. 3100 Magazine. 897-0920. Ethiopian.
»Nirvana. 4308 Magazine. 894-9797. Indian.
»Parasol's. 2533 Constance. 899-2054. Sandwiches.
Phillips Restaurant and Bar. 733 Cherokee (at Maple). 865-1155. Pizza. Sandwiches.
»Reginelli's Pizzeria. 741 State. 899-1414. Pizza. Sandwiches
Rocky's Pizza Joint. 3222 Magazine. 891-5152. Pizza.
»Savvy Gourmet. 4519 Magazine. 895-2665. Creole. Cooking School.
Slim Goodies. 3322 Magazine. 891-3447. Neighborhood cafe. Sandwiches. Breakfast.
St. Charles Tavern. 1433 St. Charles Ave. 523-9823. Neighborhood Cafe.
Superior Bar & Grill. 3636 Charles Ave. 899-4200. Mexican.
»Taqueria Corona. 5932 Magazine St. 897-3974. Mexican.
The Grocery. 2854 St. Charles Ave. 895-9524. Deli.
»Theo's Pizza. 4218 Magazine. 894-8554. Pizza.
»Upperline. 1413 Upperline. 891-9822. Classic Creole.
Urban Cup Cafe. 4861 Magazine. 895-5858. Sandwiches.
Winnie's Artsy Cafe. 3454 Magazine. 899-3374. Neighborhood

Skillets
Junior Burger
RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/02/16 18:53:33
Lola's on Esplanade and Laiuzza's By The Tracks are both open too. Two of my favorite places! Garlic Shrimp at Lola's and BBQ Shrimp or Oyster w/garlic sauce po-boy at Laiuzza's By The Track.
garryd451
Double Cheeseburger
RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/02/16 22:05:37
Here's a link to a story about trailers that made in Elkhart Indiana for Hurricanes Victims. WSBT TV22 that did this story is located in South Bend Indiana. South Bend is approx 14 miles west of Elkhart.



http://www.wsbt.com/news/local/2324056.html
Ort. Carlton.
Filet Mignon
RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/02/16 23:16:00
Dearfolk,
Does anyone know whether Mother's has reopened or not? I heard they fell victim to one of the uncontrolled fires up on Gravier Street.
I can't help but wonder if Berdou's in Gretna made it through. I think they were up on a little bit of a rise... as N. O. goes, anyhow.
And musically, does anyone know if Frankie Ford was ever accounted for? He lived in Gretna; his house was washed totally away, from what I've been able to piece together.
At least Jazz & Heritage Festival will continue on, out at the Fairgrounds. Fats Domino will be performing there. I really, really hope I can go. Gracious.
Muffalettalessly, Ort. Carlton in Un-Debris-Strewn (except after a football game) Athens, Georgia.
Greymo
Filet Mignon
RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/02/17 08:01:20
This is {in part) a newsletter sent out by a famous restaurant reviewer in New Orleans. He used to send a weekly newsletter but this is the very first one he has sent since Katrina and it made me happy.

PICKING UP STEAM

Last Friday, my list of open restaurants stood at 497. Since there
are always a few reopened places out there that have escaped
my notice, I asked the listeners on my radio show to call in if
they knew of any restaurants that were open but not on my list.
My goal was to confirm enough such reports to get the number
up to 500 before we went off the air. And we did.

We picked a good time to do that, apparently. Here it is Tuesday,
and just since Friday I've found or confirmed another twenty-one
restaurants open. This is not just because more of them are
turning up. More restaurants are actually opening, at a fast
pace--no doubt to be there for Mardi Gras business that we're not
supposed to be getting. Included among them are a few that
some people have been asking for: Don's Seafood and Copeland's
Cheesecake Bistro in Metairie, to name two that opened last
week.

Yes, things are moving faster all the time. Even the
Times-Picaune, which has generally taken an editorial policy
reflective of the loser mentality of the most vocal people around
town, has taken to running a column that sticks entirely to
positive signs. They are finding them without difficulty. Maybe
this will cause them to back away from their ridiculous and
unjustifiable vendetta against Emeril.

Meanwhile, existing restaurants, while continuing to wring their
hands over the di! fficulty of staffing their restaurants, are
nevertheless expanding their hours. That's happening a day at a
time (for example, Cuvee added Friday lunch and the Bon Ton
Friday dinner last week). But it is happening.

I'll restate my prediction of some months ago: We'll have a
difficult, frustrating spring, followed by a more or less normal
summer dominated by a tremendous amount of construction and
a mass return to town of homeowners. Then a tremendous burst
of business and recovery in the fall. Watch for it, look forward to
it, get ready to take advantage of it.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
NOTABLE REOPENINGS

ARNAUD'S WILL RESUME BRUNCH MARDI GRAS SUNDAY
Arnaud's, which for my money has one of the three or four best
brunch menus in the city, begins serving that celebratory meal
starting the Sunday before Mardi Gras. That's a very busy day
downtown, of course, so it's a good bet to open as a full house.
As they did when they opened for dinner two and a half months
ago, they'll have the full brunch menu available. It's one of the
biggest around, with not only all the great egg dishes beautifully
done, but a substantial number of plats that could serve well as
lunch or dinner.

The only thing that bothers me about this--on opening day,
anyway--is whether the French Quarter will be open to parking.

CUVEE BEGINS SERVING FRIDAY LUNCH
Cuvee, which has been open for dinner since October, has put a
toe into the lunch waters. Last Friday, Chef Bob Iacovone started
cooking lunch once a week, too. This so we have another
first-class restaurant for the enjoyment of the lengthy lunches for
which Fridays are celebrated in New Orleans. The proximity to
the courthouses can only help.

CLEMENTINE'S BELGIAN BISTRO RETURNS

This delightful purveyor of all things Belgian--notably mussels
many different ways, fried potatoes, fondue, and the
beer-and-beef Flemish stew--has reopened in Gretna. It's in the
bui! lding th at was once Willy Coln's Chalet, understated and
comfortable, not far from Oakwood Mall. I was unable to speak
with Chef Laurent personally, but his answering machine
message tells the hours: lunch Tuesdays and Wednesdays,
Dinner Thursdays through Saturday. This is another restaurant
which has generated many calls. 2505 Whitney Ave., 366-3995.

Coming Soon: Pascal's Manale (probably March 1), Pelican Club
(Feb. 23).

Complete List Of Reopened Restaurants:
http://www.nomenu.com/Subscriber/RestaurantsOpen.html
mudbug
Cheeseburger
RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/02/17 10:22:13
Greymo-Tom Fitzmorris' NO Menu has been out for a couple of months now.You can sign up at www.nomenu.com.He's set it up as a constant stream rather than every day.It contains all the usual Fitzmorris info.Still the best source for New Orleans restaurant news and reviews.IMHO
mudbug
Cheeseburger
RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/02/17 10:31:45
Ort.-Mother's is,indeed,open.The fires were down the block and the flooding/looting was relatively minor.I urge everyone who's thinkin' Jazzfest to do it this year.Believe me,all concerned could use the hugs and the cash.It should be a memorable occasion.BTW Frankie Ford is scheduled for the second weekend.Chow
The Travelin Man
Filet Mignon
RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/02/17 11:46:09
quote:
Originally posted by V960

I've been there a number of times since the disaster and may I recommend a Glock? The place is a God awful mess and many not so nice folks are wandering about. Do what you want but it is still a dangerous place.


I was there just this week and couldn't agree with you more. I stayed at the Sheraton New Orleans, which is just outside the French Quarter on Canal Street. Inside my hotel, things were fine, but outside, I did not feel safe -- and I don't spook easily.

I arrived around 9:30 pm from the airport. I was a little hungry and asked what might be open within walking distance at this late hour. The hotel folks told me that I would only find bar food -- or hit the room service menu. Hmmm....not a good sign. I got up to my room (a lovely suite on the 21st floor -- a nice surprise!) and looked out the floor-to-ceiling windows to a view of the city. I realized that the Harrah's casino was well within walking distance, so i figured that sometimes casinos have food being served until all hours -- I might do OK??? Walked outside, turned about one block north and just had this overwhelmingly eerie feeling. The streets were all but empty -- and the few people who were out sure didn't look like the friendly, Chamber of Commerce folks. One of the things that makes cities like NYC safe is that some of the safety just comes from numbers. If there are a lot of people around, you are a lot less likely to get hassled. With relatively few people around -- and the fact that the hotel personnel didn't ever suggest walking down to the casino, made me a little nervous.

I turned back -- slept a good sleep in the hotel and was on my way in the morning. My situation was somewhat unique. I was there on business -- and tried to add a little fun or a good meal. I wasn't there long, but it was long enough to think I don't need to head back there any time soon.
Skillets
Junior Burger
RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/08/24 19:45:37
Please go out to eat August 29 and support the Gulf Coast Recovery from Hurricane Katrina. Enter your ZIPcode in the right hand side of the Website and find a participating restaurant. If there are none in your area, suggest it to your favorite place.

http://www.strength.org/restaurants/diners/

One Night, One Meal Can Make a Difference
Dine out on Tuesday, August 29th at your favorite participating restaurant and you'll be helping relief efforts in the Gulf Coast region.

Share Our Strength invites you to dine out on Tuesday, August 29th, the one-year anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, for Share Our Strength’s Restaurants for Relief 2, presented by American Express. This nationwide event is the organization’s second annual dine-out to benefit Gulf Coast recovery efforts and is organized in partnership with Food Network and the National Restaurant Association.

Diners across the country can enjoy food and drink at thousands of participating restaurants that are contributing a portion of their proceeds to Share Our Strength’s hurricane recovery efforts. As part of its efforts to end childhood hunger in America, Share Our Strength is helping families in the Gulf Coast region. By dining out on August 29th, the anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, your support will help rebuild school cafeterias, open summer meal programs, provide assistance for affected restaurant workers, and more.

Other Ways You Can Help
If you can't dine out August 29th, take a look at some other ways you can make a difference:

Subscribe to The Six O'Clock Scramble: As Part of Share Our Strength's Restaurants for Relief 2, 50% of your subscription to this newsletter featuring quick, healthy and delicious recipes for busy families will be donated to Share Our Strength's hurricane recovery efforts.
Buy a Restaurant.Com dining certificate. Buy a $25 gift certificate from Restaurant.Com for only $10 and fifty percent of the proceeds will support Share Our Strength's efforts to end childhood hunger and ongoing recovery efforts in the Gulf Coast. The certificates are good at over 7,000 participating restaurants.
Support the Restaurants for Relief Riders. As part of Share Our Strength's Restaurants for Relief 2, a national dine-around to be held on August 29, the one-year anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, District Hogs will ride 1,600 miles from DC to South Dakota from August 1st to the 11th to the 66th Annual Sturgis Rally. They will be collecting pledges both online and at their restaurants through August 29th. Find out more or to pledge your support.
Make a donation. 100% of the donations will go directly to local programs supporting hurricane recovery efforts.
pmrkr2
Cheeseburger
RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2006/08/24 20:15:45
sounds like a great way to help. looks like i know what i'll be doing for dinner and maybe lunch too on august 29
plb
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2008/10/24 20:45:25
quote:
Originally posted by Ort. Carlton.

Dearfolk,
And musically, does anyone know if Frankie Ford was ever accounted for? He lived in Gretna; his house was washed totally away, from what I've been able to piece together.


I just say an ad for a Royal Caribbean cruise that features The Vogues, The Duprees, The Shades of Blue, and Frankie Ford.
Big Ugly Mich
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2010/01/27 17:29:32
Much as I, speaking for The Contingent, love my Packers, I think we ALL agree that the Saints have a better fight song than both our teams combined!

GO SAINTS!
mbrookes
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2010/01/28 13:31:28
That's "Geaux Saints"!
We are all excited here about the Saints, since they are close enough that we consider them our hometown team.
zydecocruiser
Junior Burger
RE: Welcome Back New Orleans! 2010/02/01 00:18:22
GEAUX SAINTS!!!