Brooklyn

Post
NYNM
Filet Mignon
2006/04/29 07:39:35
Reading about candy on another part of Roadfood, I noticed how many people mentioned Brooklyn. I have once read that 1 in 6 people ion the US can trace their roots to Brookln.

So I ask:

How many of you have ever lived in Brooklyn, or come from families from Brooklyn?

Me: 1948 (birth) - 1975. Flatlands : Ave. M & E. 28 St.
wanderingjew
Sirloin
RE: Brooklyn 2006/04/29 08:43:15
Both Parents were born in Brooklyn.
I lived @ East 10th St and Ave J from 1988-1990
NYNM
Filet Mignon
RE: Brooklyn 2006/04/29 08:57:58
Also, my mother was born in Red Hook. Bklyn. Coffey St & Van Brunt.
ken8038
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Brooklyn 2006/04/29 09:13:28
Bay Ridge section here. b.1948. NJ since 1985. Parents: Dad raised in the German enclave of Ridgewood (on the Brooklyn/Queens border), Mom born in Little Italy, grew up in the same house as me in Bay Ridge.

PS to NYNM-- Red Hook is the latest hot gentrification area in NYC.
NYNM
Filet Mignon
RE: Brooklyn 2006/04/29 09:20:05
Yes, I know about Red Hook - my grandmother sold their 3 floor building in the 1980's : two 2 bedroom corner units with store beneath for total $17,000. That's when the neighborhood was "bad". I'll bet she could make $1,700,000 now if we held out!

Also, I forgot, I lived in Bay Ridge from 1972-5: 72 St & Colonial Rd.!
Twinwillow
Sirloin
RE: Brooklyn 2006/04/29 11:48:02
I was born in Brooklyn in 1939. Lived at 70 Lenox road off Flatbush ave near Caton ave and Church ave. I rember eating "Charlotte Russe" out of cups on
Flatbush ave as well as (red) candy apples and of course, egg creams and chocolate covered marshmallow cookies at "Walls" candy store.
I remember "Garfields" cafeteria at Church and Flatbush. And the best Chinese food at the "upstairs" places. I remember going to the movies on Saturdays with 25 cents. That bought addmision to two full length movies, shorts and cartoons and sometimes a live show between features And still enough for two candy treats. Usally, a "Bonomo's" vanilla Turkish taffy bar and a box of "Juicyfriut"
It was great growing up in Brooklyn.
NYNM
Filet Mignon
RE: Brooklyn 2006/04/29 13:08:22
Ah, Charlotte Russe!
I posted them on the "desserts" area last year and got no response; maybe you weren't a member then.
Weren't they like sponge cakes with lots of whipped cream in cardboard "tubes" with scalloped ridges? I think some fruit like strawberry or cherry?
Twinwillow
Sirloin
RE: Brooklyn 2006/04/29 13:33:42
quote:
Originally posted by NYNM

Ah, Charlotte Russe!
I posted them on the "desserts" area last year and got no response; maybe you weren't a member then.
Weren't they like sponge cakes with lots of whipped cream in cardboard "tubes" with scalloped ridges? I think some fruit like strawberry or cherry?

You got it! And, as you ate, you would push it up from the bottom to expose more cream untll you got to the sponge cake.
No, I was not a member then. But, I have been reading the Stern's books for about 20 years. Still have the original "Roadfood" in soft cover. I remember taking it along on our road travels and finding all the great places they visited.
cornfed
Cheeseburger
RE: Brooklyn 2006/04/29 13:53:10
Recently moved from Brooklyn. Lived in the Kensington and Greenpoint areas for 8 years. Already miss DiFara's, Polish meat markets, Bonnie's burgers, and Louie G's ices. Don't miss the subway, the depressing apartment buildings, the rotten fruit stands, and the lack of good supermarkets. These days, Brooklyn is either gentrified or close to dying, a thing of the past. But from my experience, Brooklyn has the smartest percentage of people in the country. Big love to the BKLYN.
Tedbear
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Brooklyn 2006/04/29 14:01:47
I was born in Brooklyn in 1948, and we lived in Bay Ridge (81st St. & Third Avenue) until 1956, when we moved to NJ. My father was born in The Bronx, and grew up in Staten Island, and my mother was born in Greenwich Village. The only borough with which we have little connection is Queens.
The Travelin Man
Filet Mignon
RE: Brooklyn 2006/04/29 16:43:36
The paternal grandparents lived at 14th Street and Ave K (right across from Midwood High School) until the late 1990s. I think that the only time I "lived" in Brooklyn myself was in the womb.

BUT, I will be at Brooklyn Tech High School next Saturday and plan on a stop at Juniors after my business for a slice of their famous cheesecake. If I play my cards right, I may also hit Grimaldi's for pie and hop across the street to the Brooklyn Ice Cream Factory for dessert. Don't know if I can pull off that trifecta, though.
Twinwillow
Sirloin
RE: Brooklyn 2006/04/29 19:03:25
quote:
Originally posted by stevekoe

The paternal grandparents lived at 14th Street and Ave K (right across from Midwood High School) until the late 1990s. I think that the only time I "lived" in Brooklyn myself was in the womb.

BUT, I will be at Brooklyn Tech High School next Saturday and plan on a stop at Juniors after my business for a slice of their famous cheesecake. If I play my cards right, I may also hit Grimaldi's for pie and hop across the street to the Brooklyn Ice Cream Factory for dessert. Don't know if I can pull off that trifecta, though.

Junior's cheesecake is now sold in Dallas at Central Market and Deli-News.
Just as good as the original Brooklyn deli.
NYNM
Filet Mignon
RE: Brooklyn 2006/04/30 15:45:25
How can we mention Brooklyn without Ebinger's cakes?
Twinwillow
Sirloin
RE: Brooklyn 2006/04/30 16:29:16
quote:
Originally posted by NYNM

How can we mention Brooklyn without Ebinger's cakes?

Ahh, Ebingers. No one went to someones house without bringing an Ebinger's "Blackout cake", Right?
Tedbear
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Brooklyn 2006/04/30 17:36:32

I seem to recall that my mother got her baked goods from Krug's, which I believe was a delivery operation similar to Dugan's. Does anyone remember Krug's in Brooklyn, circa 1950, or Dugan's in NJ, circa 1960? They operated in a somewhat similar fashion to milkmen, except that these bakery route salesmen would ring your bell in the afternoon, and would show you what was available that day. We loved the jellyrolls from Dugan's. It was really convenient!

I can recall an advertising campaign that Dugan's ran on the radio in the late '50s or perhaps the early '60s. Their slogan in that ad was, "Thomas' promises, but Dugan's delivers!"

While I don't recall any advertising for Krug's, I do recall that my brother looked forward to getting the next issue of their Peter Wheat comic book, which was only available from the Krug's delivery man. As a result of his nagging my mother for the next Peter Wheat comic book, it virtually guaranteed that she would buy something from the Krug's man when he visited.
Twinwillow
Sirloin
RE: Brooklyn 2006/04/30 17:53:40
quote:
Originally posted by Tedbear


I seem to recall that my mother got her baked goods from Krug's, which I believe was a delivery operation similar to Dugan's. Does anyone remember Krug's in Brooklyn, circa 1950, or Dugan's in NJ, circa 1960? They operated in a somewhat similar fashion to milkmen, except that these bakery route salesmen would ring your bell in the afternoon, and would show you what was available that day. We loved the jellyrolls from Dugan's. It was really convenient!

I can recall an advertising campaign that Dugan's ran on the radio in the late '50s or perhaps the early '60s. Their slogan in that ad was, "Thomas' promises, but Dugan's delivers!"
I remember, either, Dugan's or Krug's delivering cake to my aunts house on Long Island back in the very late 40's or early 50's. Not sure which company it was. But, it was one of the above.

While I don't recall any advertising for Krug's, I do recall that my brother looked forward to getting the next issue of their Peter Wheat comic book, which was only available from the Krug's delivery man. As a result of his nagging my mother for the next Peter Wheat comic book, it virtually guaranteed that she would buy something from the Krug's man when he visited.
Tedbear
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Brooklyn 2006/04/30 17:56:28
Some other memories of Bay Ridge, circa 1955:

My brother & I attended P.S. 185, located on 86th Street. The Principal of P.S. 185 was Mrs. Schindel, who was not exactly a barrel of laughs. The school was located directly across from The Kallman (sp?) Home, which was an orphanage. The kids from the Kallman Home were immediately recognizeable, as they did not dress very well in comparison with the other middle-class kids in the school, and the boys had haircuts that were sort of like "convict haircuts", unfortunately. Many of my friends attended St. Alselm's Elementary School, rather than P.S. 185.

Further East on 86th Street, there was a little restaurant called The Green Tea Room. I think that the decor was green, rather than the tea. If you went another few blocks East on 86th Street, the neighborhood movie theater was The Dyker (what a name!), where I can remember seeing the 1950s era production of Robin Hood, and also some horse opera starring Rhonda Fleming. I was captivated by Rhonda's auburn hair and her beauty.

On Third Avenue (around 84th or 85th Street) was a pet shop that we nicknamed "The Smelly Petshop". They sold dogs and clearly they did not clean out the cages very often. Just walking past the place was an assault to the olfactory senses. I can hardly imagine what it must have been like inside the place.

The two supermarkets were Bohack's, which opened a new store on the corner of 81st & Third around 1955, and the A & P, which operated one of their typically smelly, wooden-floored stores on Third Avenue, probably between 79th & 80th Streets.

The local Gin Mill was The Amber Tavern, located on Third Ave, between 80th & 81st. When the doors were open in the summer, the stench of stale beer was really strong. Next to The Amber was Kirsch's delicatessen, which always smelled very good.

Does anyone else share these recollections of Bay Ridge in the early-middle 1950s?
Twinwillow
Sirloin
RE: Brooklyn 2006/04/30 17:57:13
quote:
Originally posted by Tedbear


I seem to recall that my mother got her baked goods from Krug's, which I believe was a delivery operation similar to Dugan's. Does anyone remember Krug's in Brooklyn, circa 1950, or Dugan's in NJ, circa 1960? They operated in a somewhat similar fashion to milkmen, except that these bakery route salesmen would ring your bell in the afternoon, and would show you what was available that day. We loved the jellyrolls from Dugan's. It was really convenient!

I can recall an advertising campaign that Dugan's ran on the radio in the late '50s or perhaps the early '60s. Their slogan in that ad was, "Thomas' promises, but Dugan's delivers!"

While I don't recall any advertising for Krug's, I do recall that my brother looked forward to getting the next issue of their Peter Wheat comic book, which was only available from the Krug's delivery man. As a result of his nagging my mother for the next Peter Wheat comic book, it virtually guaranteed that she would buy something from the Krug's man when he visited.
NYNM
Filet Mignon
RE: Brooklyn 2006/04/30 19:37:20
Waldbaums supermarkets!
NYNM
Filet Mignon
RE: Brooklyn 2006/04/30 19:44:47







Does anyone else share these recollections of Bay Ridge in the early-middle 1950s?


Bay Ridge, 1970's: Leske's Bakery. Old time tastes from when Bay Ridge was Scandanavian.
John A
Filet Mignon
RE: Brooklyn 2006/05/01 08:03:16
Hey, let's not forget the Bronx, Fordham Road, Bronx Zoo, NY Yankees, etc. I lived on East Tremont Avenue from 48-54.

John
Tedbear
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Brooklyn 2006/05/01 10:58:08
quote:
Originally posted by John A

Hey, let's not forget the Bronx, Fordham Road, Bronx Zoo, NY Yankees, etc. I lived on East Tremont Avenue from 48-54.

John


John--This was started as a Brooklyn thread. Why not start a Bronx thread if you want to explore connections with that borough?
Pigiron
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Brooklyn 2006/05/01 11:13:54
Both my parents were born in East New York, Brooklyn.

I lived in Carroll Gardens, Brooklyn from ages 24-28 (1990-94)
albinoni
Cheeseburger
RE: Brooklyn 2006/05/01 11:54:55
We moved from the East Village to Brooklyn in 1977, just after I finished 4 years of school there. Moved out 20 years later. I still work there.

We moved to Brooklyn after getting a late night phone call that a great apartment was about to be rented, and we should hustle if we wanted it. It was a super, and affordable, apartment in a hi-rise on Plaza Street East, just on the edge of Park Slope. A few young people lived there, but mostly old-timers who had lived in other nabes that had crumbled around them (mostly Jewish seniors who'd lived further east on Eastern Parkway, or Irish-Americans who'd lived in brownstones on nearby blocks that had yet to gentrify).

Over the years we experienced just about everything that anyone could in an "emerging" neighborhood--lack of services, noise, drug dealing corner stores, bad shopping, crime and random violence, and a demoralizing sense of the future, followed by a real estate boomlet in the '80s where apartment buildings like ours converted from rental to co-op. With some doubts, we bought and became investors in our own space, and after a few years of paper wealth, watched the market collapse in the 90's, and stay in the dumpster for what seemed like an eternity. After a few years, crack was taking over, it was getting really depressing, everyone wanted out, but couldn't sell. When we moved, things were just beginning to get better, and you could sense it. Now, it's hot.

I never experienced the Brooklyn of old that now seems to be fueling the nostalgia industy, although traces of it still existed: Gage and Tollner, the politicians whose names were familiar to everyone, the various clubs and organizations that catered to a different generation that had different social outlets, and an auction house (Columbia Galleries), located on a seedy block off Fulton Street, that disposed of estates of Brooklynites who lived their entire lives in the brownstones, rambling single family Victorians, and large apartment buildings and whose deaths, one by one, diminished the unique character of their neighorhoods. Nor will I ever experience the "new" Brooklyn that was gestating as I left--and although I love where I live now, I left with tears in my eyes, since I realized that after all that time, I had gone beyond just owning an apartment, and was giving up my identity as a Brooklynite.

Charlie (now back to being a Jersey boy)
John A
Filet Mignon
RE: Brooklyn 2006/05/02 07:18:05
quote:
Originally posted by Tedbear

quote:
Originally posted by John A

Hey, let's not forget the Bronx, Fordham Road, Bronx Zoo, NY Yankees, etc. I lived on East Tremont Avenue from 48-54.

John


John--This was started as a Brooklyn thread. Why not start a Bronx thread if you want to explore connections with that borough?


Hi TB,

Just injecting a little humor, even I know the Bronx cannot compare to Brooklyn.

John

BrooklynBill
Cheeseburger
RE: Brooklyn 2006/05/03 11:41:09
I was born in The Brooklyn Hospital and lived in Brooklyn for almost all of my first 25 years.
I played stickball on the street, played in Marine Park, Prospect Park and Bambino’s poolroom. Attended Brooklyn Prep and James Madison. Rode the Nostrand Ave. and the Flatbush Ave. trolleys, the Ave. R. Bus, and the IRT or the BMT to Manhattan. Frequented Ebbets Field, Sheepshead Bay, Coney Island and the pool at the St. George Hotel. Dined at Lundy’s, Dubrows (sp?), Nathan’s, Junior’s and Ho-Nan’s.
My parents were both born and lived in Brooklyn. On my mother’s side we have a great-plus grandfather who fought in Brooklyn, in the Revolutionary War. He was a “Red Coat.” When he returned to Great Britain he presented a map of Brooklyn to his sons and told them exactly where to settle – they did.
NYNM
Filet Mignon
RE: Brooklyn 2006/05/03 22:59:33
Brooklyn Bill: Sounds like we grew up in the same area. I do remember Dubrow's and Lundy's restaurants. Do you remember Jahn's restaurant and the "Kitchen Sink" Ice Cream dish?

Also speaking of geography, what about the old Dutch farmhouses, many of which are still in the area?
BrooklynBill
Cheeseburger
RE: Brooklyn 2006/05/04 00:29:15
quote:
NYNM Posted - 05/03/2006 : 22:59:33

Brooklyn Bill: Sounds like we grew up in the same area. I do remember Dubrow's and Lundy's restaurants. Do you remember Jahn's restaurant and the "Kitchen Sink" Ice Cream dish?

Also speaking of geography, what about the old Dutch farmhouses, many of which are still in the area?


NYNM -- I do remember Jahn's but I never went b/c my parents didn't believe in eating all that ice cream. I guess they were ahead of their time.

There was an old Dutch farmhouse near Ave. T and Hearing St.(sp?) I remember another in the Mill Basen area. There was also an actual windmill near Marine Park. It was destroyed by fire in the late 1940's.
There was also a large farmhouse on Ave. S or Ave. T near East 27th Street.

I grew up on Batchelder St. near Ave. S.
PaulBPool
Cheeseburger
RE: Brooklyn 2006/05/04 15:35:32
Long Island has been my home all of my life, including 5.5 years in Queens County when I was born, but, Mom's family lived on Liberty Avenue in Brooklyn for many years prior to moving to St. Albans Queens. So...guess I've got a bit of brooklynite in me as well!
Several years ago, when I was working in sales, and Brooklyn was part of my territory, I remember stopping in at "Junior's" for a slice of cheesecake and an egg cream - and it was a real taste of the past!
Tedbear
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Brooklyn 2006/05/04 18:25:08
Recently, in an odd moment with no major work assignment, I "googled" Bay Ridge, my old neighborhood. One of the websites that came up had information about the Russell Pedersen Memorial Playground. This immediately attracted my attention, since one of my playmates back in the early-middle 1950s was named Russell Pedersen. Imagine my shock to learn that Russell had died in the Viet Nam War, many years ago, and that this playground had been dedicated to his memory as a result of his dedication to the area's recreation program prior to his demise. This was a sobering moment indeed, to learn that one of my absolute closest friends from my childhood had passed away years ago in that ill-conceived foreign war. After we moved to NJ in 1956, I kept in touch with my friends for several years, and then, the inevitable lack of time for continued contact took its toll.

That moment got me to thinking about Russell and my other little friends of that time. Russell's father was a waiter at Leone's Restaurant, which I believe was the original name of Mama Leone's, before it became a tourist haunt. My other friends included Bradley Coddington, who I believe, moved to Long Island somewhere around 1955, and also Gary Rodgers (or was it Rogers) and his brother "Bucky". Gary was a leader even at a young age, and his goal as a child, was to become a priest. I have frequently wondered if he achieved that goal. There was also Tommy Gallucci, who was a few years younger. I seem to recall that his father was a Stevedore, but that could be a faulty recollection on my part.

Isn't is sad when we lose touch with our roots? And isn't it even sadder to learn that a childhood friend died without your being aware of it?

Ciaoman
Cheeseburger
RE: Brooklyn 2006/05/05 18:06:13
Lot's of memories. I was born in '47 at Brooklyn Hospital and lived in what was called Williamsburg (Vernon Ave near Tomkins Ave) until 54 when we moved to the "country" (CT). Riding the Broadway El, eating Charlotte Russe at a German bakery on Graham Ave, buying Jewish appetizer-type foods at a tiny store on DeKalb, cakes at Ebingers, it goes on and on. I recall the candy store on the corner where egg creams ruled, and the little bagel shop (where bagels were, by today's behemoth standards, tiny). We were deprived I guess--there was no such thing as a sun dried tomato bagel. Wonder how we survived? Does anyone remember when Bickfords was an excellent cafeteria in NYC? What about Chock Full 'a Nuts?

Chinese food every Sunday! Funny what you remember.

Whenever I see the word "neighborhood," I think of the area where we lived. All sorts of folks, all getting along. Perhaps the fog of reminiscence is clouding the truth a bit, but I do have overwhelmingly favorable memories of that place. Still go back on occasion but, a lot has changed. (Great topic!)
albinoni
Cheeseburger
RE: Brooklyn 2006/05/06 20:57:52
For the first few years we lived in Brooklyn, Church Avenue between Ocean Avenue and Coney Island Avenue still had a lot of the old businesses. We were told about Dubin's Bakery, and started going there every Sunday for coffeecakes and pastry, as well as rye bread and Jewish corn bread (something worth a whole separate topic) that was the best to be found anywhere. I remember they had a double pecan ring that was filled with whipped cream--it was unbelievable. The place was staffed with little old ladies behind the counter who loved to joke with the customers. Then one day, with no warning, they closed down.

Charlie
Ciaoman
Cheeseburger
RE: Brooklyn 2006/05/06 21:08:58
Charlie, I remember the bakeries in Brooklyn very well--seems like every neighborhood had a couple. Absolutely great stuff. Ebingers had a special cake that had a fantastic chocolate butter cream icing covered with slivered almonds.

Your comments about Dubins reminded me about the movie "Fatso" with Dom DeLuise. In it, there's a scene where he goes to a bakery for a bunch of stuff--those are the kinds of bakeries that are virtually impossible to find anymore. Cakes, tortes, pies, real Danish...just thinking about it raises my glucose level.
cornfed
Cheeseburger
RE: Brooklyn 2006/05/06 22:10:48
Ostrovitsky's on Ave. J amd Coney Island Ave. is still a very good bakery. Great cheese danishes and marble pound cake. Rude counterhelp, though.
MacTAC
Cheeseburger
RE: Brooklyn 2006/05/06 23:31:26
quote:
Originally posted by Ciaoman

Does anyone remember when Bickfords was an excellent cafeteria in NYC?

I remember the name but never ate there to my knowledge. I remember when they came out with a version called Bick's. Didn't last too long, I don't think. Some interesting info in the short Wikipedia link below.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bickford's
albinoni
Cheeseburger
RE: Brooklyn 2006/05/07 20:57:47
quote:
Originally posted by Ciaoman

Charlie, I remember the bakeries in Brooklyn very well--seems like every neighborhood had a couple. Absolutely great stuff. Ebingers had a special cake that had a fantastic chocolate butter cream icing covered with slivered almonds.

Your comments about Dubins reminded me about the movie "Fatso" with Dom DeLuise. In it, there's a scene where he goes to a bakery for a bunch of stuff--those are the kinds of bakeries that are virtually impossible to find anymore. Cakes, tortes, pies, real Danish...just thinking about it raises my glucose level.


Ebinger's gets mentioned a lot here and among old time Brooklynites. I never had the chance to experience any of their legendary cakes.

The old-time Brooklyn Jewish bakery had an aroma that no other bakery had--a very heavy sweet smell that hit you like a brick when you walked through the door. Italian bakeries have a completely different aroma. I think it might have been almond paste. Until recently we had a Jewish bakery here in my town that had been here forever, was probably once great but got tired and apathetic. That aroma was missing, and the product reflected that.

Charlie
Ciaoman
Cheeseburger
RE: Brooklyn 2006/05/08 10:02:05
Speaking of Jewish bakeries, the thing that really sticks out in my memory were the breads...real crusty rye that stood up to a sandwich, hard rolls that were crusty and light (not the so-called bulkie rolls that are like round white bread. Yuck). I also fondly remember the onion rolls. A roast beef sandwich on an onion roll with horseradish!

I know of a town in my area that also had a Jewish backery for many years that closed down. It was famouse for what they called "Dark Russian Rye"--a huge oblong loaf covered with special seeds that they imported. Persons would come from surrounding states to buy this bread. With the addition of sweet butter, it was a meal!
albinoni
Cheeseburger
RE: Brooklyn 2006/05/09 14:21:35
quote:
Originally posted by Ciaoman

Speaking of Jewish bakeries, the thing that really sticks out in my memory were the breads...real crusty rye that stood up to a sandwich, hard rolls that were crusty and light (not the so-called bulkie rolls that are like round white bread. Yuck). I also fondly remember the onion rolls. A roast beef sandwich on an onion roll with horseradish!

I know of a town in my area that also had a Jewish backery for many years that closed down. It was famouse for what they called "Dark Russian Rye"--a huge oblong loaf covered with special seeds that they imported. Persons would come from surrounding states to buy this bread. With the addition of sweet butter, it was a meal!


Sounds like it could be the Russian Pumpernickle that is almost impossible to find now. It was a very dark loaf, with or without seeds, quite dense, with a deep rich, almost chocolaty flavor.
The Travelin Man
Filet Mignon
RE: Brooklyn 2006/05/13 19:51:51
Seems like with the plethora of Brooklyn-ites and natives, this might as well be as good a place to ask this question as any.

I want to walk across the Brooklyn Bridge. I would like to park the car near Grimaldi's, take the subway to Manhattan and then walk back across from Manhattan to Brooklyn, have lunch at Grimaldi's and then the Brooklyn Ice Cream Factory.

I am pretty sure that this is feasible, but was wondering if anyone could offer the specifics (get on the subway at the corner of X and Y -- take it to XX station -- the entrance to the bridge will be on the....) to support this endeavor. I have been told that it takes about 1/2 hour to walk the bridge, but if anyone has experience actually pulling off a stunt like this, I would like to have an idea on what you think the complete time it would take -- as on the evening of the afternoon for which I have this planned, I need to work -- so, I do need to allot enough time to do this.

Thanks,
Steve
albinoni
Cheeseburger
RE: Brooklyn 2006/05/15 10:58:21
quote:
Originally posted by stevekoe

Seems like with the plethora of Brooklyn-ites and natives, this might as well be as good a place to ask this question as any.

I want to walk across the Brooklyn Bridge. I would like to park the car near Grimaldi's, take the subway to Manhattan and then walk back across from Manhattan to Brooklyn, have lunch at Grimaldi's and then the Brooklyn Ice Cream Factory.

I am pretty sure that this is feasible, but was wondering if anyone could offer the specifics (get on the subway at the corner of X and Y -- take it to XX station -- the entrance to the bridge will be on the....) to support this endeavor. I have been told that it takes about 1/2 hour to walk the bridge, but if anyone has experience actually pulling off a stunt like this, I would like to have an idea on what you think the complete time it would take -- as on the evening of the afternoon for which I have this planned, I need to work -- so, I do need to allot enough time to do this.

Thanks,
Steve


It is feasable, but you'll need time as there are no subway stops in the immediate area of Grimadi's.

The nearest stop is High Street/Brooklyn Bridge on the A and C line. One entrance to the station is on Cadman Plaza West, which is an extension of Fulton Street (in fact, it used to be called Fulton Street) which is where Grimaldi's and Ice Cream Factory are located. It is about 5-10 minute walk. Take either the A or C train one stop to the Broadway/Nassau stop in Manhattan, walk over to Park Row (where J&R computers and electronics is located), and pick up the Brooklyn Bridge walkway opposite City Hall.

How much time this will take depends on how fast you walk. 1/2 hour is about right for normal pace, but the views are very arresting and will slow you down.

Charlie
The Travelin Man
Filet Mignon
RE: Brooklyn 2006/05/17 00:06:43
Thanks! I am going to give this a shot, weather permitting tomorrow. Hopefully, I will have some good photos to share when I get done!
i95
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Brooklyn 2009/11/11 15:06:18
BrooklynBill 

Dined at Lundy’s...

 
 
 
Nice paean to Brooklyn's former Lundy's by bon vivant Arthur Schwartz
in his latest e-mail / newsletter reprinted here:
 
 
LUNDY’S ON MY MIND – NOW ON MY WALL
 
A few weeks ago, for no good reason other than I was already on ebay.com checking out a piece of pottery I was bidding on, I put the word "Lundy’s" into the search line. Sometimes a fork or spoon comes up from the favorite restaurant of my youth. I have a couple of pieces of Lundy’s flatware now, but you can always fit another fork, spoon or knife into your life. There were no Lundy’s utensils for sale, but there was the 1934 sea foam green and orange mosaic plaque that hung outside the front door on Emmons Ave. and beside the clam bar entrance on Ocean Ave. (There were two.) The plaque says F.W.I.L. on a diagonal band (standing for Frederick William Irving Lundy let’s call him the main and infamous Lundy) as well as Lundy Bros. horizontally. I have a copy of "Lundy's: Reminiscences and Recipes from Brooklyn's Legendary Restaurant" by Robert Cronfield, and the plaque is pictured in it. You can also read the whole story about Lundy’s in "Arthur Schwartz’s New York City Food." I have a facsimile recipe for the famous biscuits there, too.
 
I knew about this plaque because, about 10 years ago, when I was looking for old photos of Lundy’s for my book "NYC Food," I discovered Brian Merlis, who is THE collector and dealer in Brooklyn memorabilia, as well as a genuine Brooklyn historian. He’s published numerous books filled with his vintage photographs, each on a different Brooklyn neighborhood. Back then, he showed me the Lundy’s plaque – he calls it an escutcheon – which he had recently bought. I have had it on my mind ever since, and when I saw it on ebay at a Buy It Now price I could not afford, I called Brian immediately. We negotiated and it’s mine now.
 
Before it was Brian’s, it was owned by Ed Gil, the son of the founder of Goya Foods. Before that, it must have been hanging on the Lundy’s building, which is an official New York City landmark. The restaurant closed in 1977, after a scandalous episode in which involved F.W.I.L. snipping at cops from a second-story window. The plaque must have been removed soon after.
 
By the way, the Lundy’s building, in what the New York City Landmarks Commission calls Spanish Mission style, now houses, among some other smaller businesses, including a Turkish coffee house, Cherry Hill, an upscale Russian market with imported groceries, every meat and fish known in the old Soviet empire, and a galaxy of prepared foods which, strangely, you cannot eat on the premises, even though there is a café.
Brian Merlis had the forethought to have our picture taken when he handed the sign over to me at his home in Freeport, Long Island, and the photo ran, along with a brief story about the purchase, in the Brooklyn Daily Eagle, where Brooklyn borough president Marty Markowitz read about it. He sent me a beautiful letter congratulating me on the purchase, thrilled that it is still in Brooklyn. I am thrilled that it will hang in my dining room, when we can figure out how to do that without the wall falling down. It is very heavy, a shield banded with bronze and filled with cement.
 
Now go check out www.thecitycook.com. It’s a great web site even without me.


 
NYPIzzaNut
Filet Mignon
Re:Brooklyn 2009/11/11 15:43:34
NYNM

Reading about candy on another part of Roadfood, I noticed how many people mentioned Brooklyn. I have once read that 1 in 6 people ion the US can trace their roots to Brookln.

So I ask:

How many of you have ever lived in Brooklyn, or come from families from Brooklyn?

Me: 1948 (birth) - 1975. Flatlands : Ave. M & E. 28 St.

When my grandparents on my dad's side came over from Italy in 1902 they lived first in Brooklyn with relatives until they got married and settled and started a family.  They moved to Yonkers where most of our family lived for decades.

My wife and most of her family also lived in Brooklyn originally and then moved to Queens and then to the middle Long Island area.
post edited by NYPIzzaNut - 2009/11/11 15:45:36
mar52
Sirloin
RE: Brooklyn 2009/11/11 16:21:59
My mother is from Brooklyn but escaped when she was eight.
Ajastoy
Junior Burger
RE: Brooklyn 2011/07/04 13:11:43
This might be a post 5 years to late, but I just found this now in a search. I've done various internet searchs over the past 10 yrs or so,,, and I think this is only the 2nd or so reference I  found for Dubin's Bakery. My grandfather started Dubin's back in the 30's,, and my Dad and Uncle ran it til they had to close down that one sorry day back in 1981 for Passover. They never reopened.  The economics of the times then were just so bad. We had 2 stores then. The main store on Church Ave, and it did all the baking for that location and the one we had on Kings Highway between E. 19th St and Ocean Avenue. As my dad put it back then, the Church avenue store sold more cake than bread products, and the Kings Highway store sold more bread than cake.  It was becoming easier and more economically feasible for people back then to just buy from a supermarket (before they all started having their own bakeries sprout up!).
 
Still, its nice to find kind words being said in memory of Dubin's. In the 30 years that have passed, I still havent found 1 single bakery that can bake up some of the goodies the way I will always remember them to be.  I dont even know what happened to the salesladies that we had working for us (Barry Manilow's Aunt was one of the salesladies),, I know the majority of them must have passed away. But I have the fond memories of them,,, helping the bakers in the back with doing the cookies,,,, the breads (I dont think I can remember how to braid a challah anymore :( ), decorating cakes and personalizing them.
 
It is nice to see that there are bakeries popping up, perhaps not like Dubin's,,, but nevertheless, baking their tasty treats to share with the world!
 
Nancy
 
PS if there is anyone out there that know's where to get a really good schmatonka,,, I would forever be in your debt! LOL!
Sundancer7
Fire Safety Admin
RE: Brooklyn 2011/07/04 18:33:01
I have always wanted to visit Brooklyn for their very super ethnic food.  Particually the Russian, Itailian, greek and other great places.  If I get the chance, Iwanago and I wil take a few days off and fly to NYC where we can enjoy this wonderful place.
 
Paul E. Smith
Knoxville, TN
junkliss
Junior Burger
RE: Brooklyn 2012/03/26 22:05:57
Wow.
I grew up on E21 between Church and Caton (having left Brooklyn in 1976). I must have shopped at Dubins (for my parents) from age 10 to 22 ! I can remember a man, probably your grandfather, sitting in his little office opposite the glass cases. What I would give for one of his almond horns ! My uncle (Israel Liss) was a fancy cake baker. Most of the time he worked for Jay Dees (Utica ave ?), but sometimes worked for Dubins - do you remember him ? You mentioned Barry Manilow. He lived in my apartment house until he started to play for Bette Midler. His mother, Edna Murphy (yea, check out her name) - lived in my apartment house too. I don't remember Edna or Barry ever really talking about Dubins, although Edna frequented the Turkey Bar on Church ave !
Jonathan (junkliss@optonline.net)
 
Ajastoy

This might be a post 5 years to late, but I just found this now in a search. I've done various internet searchs over the past 10 yrs or so,,, and I think this is only the 2nd or so reference I  found for Dubin's Bakery. My grandfather started Dubin's back in the 30's,, and my Dad and Uncle ran it til they had to close down that one sorry day back in 1981 for Passover. They never reopened.  The economics of the times then were just so bad. We had 2 stores then. The main store on Church Ave, and it did all the baking for that location and the one we had on Kings Highway between E. 19th St and Ocean Avenue. As my dad put it back then, the Church avenue store sold more cake than bread products, and the Kings Highway store sold more bread than cake.  It was becoming easier and more economically feasible for people back then to just buy from a supermarket (before they all started having their own bakeries sprout up!).

Still, its nice to find kind words being said in memory of Dubin's. In the 30 years that have passed, I still havent found 1 single bakery that can bake up some of the goodies the way I will always remember them to be.  I dont even know what happened to the salesladies that we had working for us (Barry Manilow's Aunt was one of the salesladies),, I know the majority of them must have passed away. But I have the fond memories of them,,, helping the bakers in the back with doing the cookies,,,, the breads (I dont think I can remember how to braid a challah anymore :( ), decorating cakes and personalizing them.

It is nice to see that there are bakeries popping up, perhaps not like Dubin's,,, but nevertheless, baking their tasty treats to share with the world!

Nancy

PS if there is anyone out there that know's where to get a really good schmatonka,,, I would forever be in your debt! LOL!


Foodbme
Porterhouse
RE: Brooklyn 2012/03/27 03:15:47
What wonderful stories you folks tell. I worked in Manhatten for 6 years but never had the opportunity to spend any time in the Boroughs, but worked with many of the people who lived there. Always had a secret yearning to go home with some of them just for the experience of having spent time in their places. I was too busy commuting 5 hours a day in and out of the Port Authority bus terminal ( 2 1/2 hours one way on a bus) then 8 hours of work to boot to spend time in the boroughs. My loss!
I also worked in North Bergen a number of years and some of my co-workers had moved to NJ from the Boroughs and told wonderful stories too. They often went "Home" on weekends and would bring me wonderful tasting goodies!