Let's see the recipes - here is mine

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PapaJoe8
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RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine - Tue, 01/2/07 6:59 PM
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Thanks for posting Frank's recipe, and welcome to roadfood! What it took me some time, as a texas chili cook, to learn here at roadfood, is that everyone is not from Texas. Folks in Cinci like their chili over pasta, and with some ciniman and maybe even celery. Folks in CA, well, who knows? Try reading the chili threads here and you will get an idea of what I am trying to say. The same debate happens with pizza. Is CiCi's mack n cheese pizza... pizza?

Is Wolf Brand w/ beans chili? Well, who knows??? Try reading the "weird things" chiii thread here and you will be amazed. And do not miss the "fantasy chili parlor" thread. Is it chili with smoked oysters? Hey, that was my addition to the weird thread. Try it and you might like it, who knows. I sometimes like to top each spoon w/ that pearl making delight.

I like to reserect long lost chili recipes, like Shanghai Jimmy's and Benny Binion's. Bob Pools famous towntown Dallas recipe from the 40's is still lost. Maybe you can help?

Anyway, some of the best chili info on the net is right here at roadfood. Glad to have anouther chili head join us.
Joe

martipr
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RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine - Thu, 01/4/07 4:11 PM
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I realize that many different people call many different things Chili. This is true even in Texas. If I called Bologna Salami it would not make it so and calling all those soups and stews, no matter how tasty, Chili does not make them Chili.

PapaJoe8
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RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine - Thu, 01/4/07 4:36 PM
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When does chili become chili stew? It all depends depends on who you ask, and where they are from.

Now, back to my quest for the perfect chili mack and cheese Texas style pizza, made on a flour tortilla! And some leftover Hoppin Papa good luck stew.
Joe

genewj
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RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine - Fri, 01/12/07 6:57 PM
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Looks good but too Pricy for a Hot dog cart!

doggydaddy
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RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine - Sat, 01/13/07 9:04 AM
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I think that folks who claim that there is only one way to make chili are elitists. It can only be found in Texas? I'm sure that New Mexico could produce a fine bowl.

I too do not have a written recipe that I can give. I base my chili on a show I saw on PBS years ago before there were cooking TV networks. The show went from kitchen to kitchen producing 'Anglo' chili.
The segment then went to this hacienda where a little Mexican woman was making her chili for the ranch hands. She just picked up handfuls of chili powder, cumin and other seasonings. She has since become my inspiration.

My recipe is a close approximation of what others make. I put diced beef instead of ground. I am generous with the chili powder and cumin. Plenty of garlic. Chipotle makes an appearance. Cilantro. I like beans. Chili, rice and beans are a complete example of all food groups.. .. except for the dessert food group.
What others have mentioned and is a nice touch is masa at the end. I make the chili a little soupy just so it can be thickened up. I sprinkle some cornmeal into the mixture.

mark

PapaJoe8
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RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine - Sat, 01/13/07 9:47 AM
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Well said Doggydaddy! Chili, like jazz, is a truely American thing. And chili, like Jazz, starts with a basic concept and goes from there. Every pot has it's own soul!
Joe

oDey in LA
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RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine - Wed, 01/17/07 10:07 AM
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quote:
Originally posted by TxConnie

Okay-- I cheat. I only make Chili with Wick Fowler's 2-Alarm Chili mix and add extra cayenne pepper. Meat varies- but I think Venison is the best.


Wick Fowler's mix is the very best I think. I have been using it at least 35 years since he franchised it . He was a writer for a Fort Worth newspaper and he used to always push the annual chili cookoff contest in Terlingula TX(spelling not correct. He died many years ago but his seasoning is even sold in Europe.

I use at least two pounds of coarse ground 80/20 chuck) Also I use two cans of the extra hot Rotel's diced tomatoes and chili peppers and an extra can of tomato paste all in addition to the ingrediants listed on the package. I do not use the mesa flour as it thickens it too much for me but that is just a personal preference.. Don't spare the course ground chuck but make sure it is sauteed well done and grease removed before tossing into the mix. Keep adding water as it cooks down and cook lo simmer for at least an hour for additional taste enrichment. The adding of extra chili powder or leaving out some is the way you make it 1 alarm, 2 alarm (as is the recipe on the package, 3 alarm (extra chili powder) 4 alarm (three alarm plus the ROTEL Extra Hot diced tomatoes and chile peppers instead of regular). There is supposedly a 5 alarm which is 4 alarm but in addition to all the above adding HABANERO Pepper slices to the mix. I love it hot but don't think I want above 4 alarm.

Of course if it is true Texas NO BEANS allowed but if you don't like it really hot the beans will decrease the heat.......

Thank God for Texas and for Wick Fowler's chili mix... Bill

mland520
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RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine - Wed, 01/17/07 10:23 AM
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just a little addition to any and all chili recipes-
I have my own chili- make it often (weather permitting) needs to be cold for me to want to eat it- and I usually don't measure- but here are the ingredients:

chopped onion
jalapeno peppers-chopped
smoky ancho chiles( dried- to rehydrate soak in hot coffee- remove seeds and chop)
add the liquid from the soak as well as dutch process chocolate (not the stuff you drink but baking type) usually a couple of soup spoons full
chili meat- either pork or beef or venison
Ranch Style beans- any one you prefer- we use pinto beans, but you could use black beans or even black-eyed peas
ground cumin, cinnamon, and Mexican chipolte chile powder
and of course S & P to taste.

Some of my friends just add the chocolate to their own recipes- try it- just adds an extra layer of flavor- and the spices really stand out!



MikeS.
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RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine - Wed, 01/17/07 12:53 PM
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From Corabeth;

saw Emeril last night (best chef of all time!)
and he made a delish looking con carne recipe as follows:



1 tablespoon olive oil
1 1/2 pounds ground turkey
2 cups chopped onion
1 cup chopped green bell pepper
4 teaspoons minced garlic
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 tablespoon Essence, recipe follows
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons ground cumin
1 teaspoon dried oregano
1/4 teaspoon cayenne
1 (15-ounce) can whole peeled tomatoes
3 tablespoons tomato paste
1 teaspoon sugar
2 cups water

Heat the oil in a large, heavy pot over medium-high heat. Add the meat and stir with a long-handled wooden spoon to break up the pieces. Cook, stirring, until the meat is brown and cooked through, about 5 minutes. Add the onion, green bell pepper, garlic, chili powder, Essence, salt, cumin, oregano, and cayenne, and cook, stirring, until soft, about 4 minutes. Put the whole tomatoes in a large mixing bowl and squeeze them with your hands to break them into pieces. Add the squeezed tomatoes and their juices, the tomato paste, sugar, and water to the pot. Stir well and bring to a boil. Lower the heat to medium-low and simmer, uncovered, for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally to prevent the con carne from sticking to the bottom of the pot. Remove the pot from the heat, and ladle into a large bowl.

Essence (Emeril's Creole Seasoning):
2 1/2 tablespoons paprika
2 tablespoons salt
2 tablespoons garlic powder
1 tablespoon black pepper
1 tablespoon onion powder
1 tablespoon cayenne pepper
1 tablespoon dried leaf oregano
1 tablespoon dried thyme

Combine all ingredients thoroughly and store in an airtight jar or container.
Yield: about 2/3 cup

Foodbme
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RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine - Thu, 01/18/07 12:18 AM
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quote:
Originally posted by PapaJoe8

When does chili become chili stew? It all depends depends on who you ask, and where they are from.

Now, back to my quest for the perfect chili mack and cheese Texas style pizza, made on a flour tortilla! And some leftover Hoppin Papa good luck stew.
Joe

There ain't no such thang as Chili Stew,. It's either Chili or it ain't. Period! End of discussion

Mosca
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RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine - Sat, 01/20/07 12:37 PM
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quote:
Originally posted by martipr

I realize that many different people call many different things Chili. This is true even in Texas. If I called Bologna Salami it would not make it so and calling all those soups and stews, no matter how tasty, Chili does not make them Chili.


Oh I dunno. That's more of an etymological question, isn't it? Just kidding. I think part of the best fun about chili is arguing this point. I'd go as far as to say, it isn't chili if you can't argue about it!

FWIW, I used to make a pretty complex chili, and it was pretty good. Now I use tiki's (edit: Bushie's, through tiki) stripped down basic recipe. It is absolutely perfect in its simplicity and balance. But I toss some beans into it.


Tom

Grillmeister
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RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine - Sat, 01/20/07 3:00 PM
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I've noticed the argument over what chili is and isn't lately, and I feel compelled to add that "It ain't rocket science". The Chili Appreciation Society International (CASI) of Terlingua fame gives a clear definition of constitutes the "state dish of Texas".

As quoted from Article I, Section A (Chili Cooking Rules):

"1. CHILI COOKED FROM SCRATCH - "Scratch" is defined as starting with raw meat. No marinating is allowed. Commercial chili powder is permissible, but complete commercial chili mixes ("just add meat" mixes that contain premeasured spices) are NOT permitted.
2. NO FILLERS IN CHILI - Beans, macaroni, rice, hominy, or other similar ingredients are not permitted."

Those recipes that do not meet this simple criteria are not allowed to compete. This still leaves a wide latitude for individual creativity and diversity.

I, for one, take it to the next level by using only beef and banning all vegetables except chiles, onion, tomato, and garlic. Stories abound of old school "brick chili" cooks who got into fistfights over the use of tomato! There are many great tasting recipes listed on this thread, but please, don't call them chili. Elitist? Perhaps, but Texans hold to their definition of chili for three reasons:

1. Accuracy. You wouldn't plop down a hamburger on the grill and call it BBQ, so why should you call a stew chili? Bastardization of a theme doesn't go on as much over on the hot dog and pizza threads so why should it here?
2. Hospitality. Fillers like beans and other vegetables reduce the amount of meat in each bite, and are regarded as a cheap trick to put over on guests. Besides, they don't freeze well.
3. Preservation of the cultural distinctiveness of our state. The use of beef, and chiles reflect the historical and agricultural trends that made Texas great (i.e. cattle industry, Hispanic heritage, etc). Think of it as a history lesson in a bowl!

So, when a Texas chili head gets vocal about their way of cooking chili, it is for the aforementioned reasons...and NOT to disparage anyone else. Go ahead and let 'em cook up a batch of their Texas Red...you'll probably be invited over to try some!

MikeS.
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RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine - Sat, 01/20/07 7:56 PM
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Grillmeister, being of Texas heritage, both parents came from there and many cousins still live there, I understand what you are saying. But (ya knew that was coming didn't ya?) I think chili has become one of those words that are generic. Kleenex doesn't like it, nor does Jello or Coke but it is a fact in American English. Chili is no longer just Texas red.

I tell this story occasionally, here it is again. While a young lad of about 11 my dad's oldest brother came for a visit from Texas. Dad and I went to Granny's house to visit her and my Uncle, when we got there Uncle was in the kitchen cooking something. I asked him what he was cooking and he replied chili. I then asked "where are the beans?"

Oh boy! He replied, very roughly and loud, "Damn it boy, chili ain't got no damn beans"

Dad came in and asked, what did you do, ask for beans?

MikeS.

Mosca
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RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine - Sun, 01/21/07 7:18 PM
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I've had horrible chili without beans. I've had great chili with beans. I say, it's chili either way.

Right now my current recipe is no beans and no tomato. But there will come a day when I change it to beans and tomato, and it will still be chili.


Tom

tiki
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RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine - Tue, 01/23/07 2:34 PM
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only chilli stew i ever saw was Red Top Stew---which is a bowl of vegetable stew top with a big old scoop of Texas red!!!

Dr of BBQ
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RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine - Sun, 02/25/07 5:34 PM
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Here is the SHORT version of a chilli recipe I sent to a friend 3 or 4 years ago. He had requested a chilli recipe and I had just run across Puppy's Breath Chili so I sent it to him. He wrote back and said, "I wanted a chilli recipe not a career". LOL. In central Illinois its spelled chilli by the way and it always contains beans. I'm going to post what is referred to as Tavern Chili in Springfield right after this post.
Jack


Puppy's Breath Chili
This recipe took the first place $25,000 prize at the
World's Chili Championship in Reno, Nevada.

Ingredients:

3 lbs. tri-tip beef or sirloin tip, cut in small pieces or ground coarse
2 tsp cooking oil
1 small yellow onion
1 14 1/2 oz can beef broth
3 1/2 tbl ground cumin
1/2 tsp oregano
6 cloves garlic, finely chopped
3 tbl Gebhardt chili powder
1 tbl New Mexico mild chili powder
5-6 tsp of California chili powder
1 8 oz. can tomato sauce
1 dried New Mexico chili pepper, boiled and pureed
3 dried California chili peppers
1 14 1/2 oz. can chicken broth
1 tsp of Tabasco pepper sauce
1 tsp of brown sugar
1 lime
Dash of MSG
Salt to taste

Directions:

Brown meat in oil for about 30 minutes over medium heat. Add onion and enough beef broth to cover meat. Bring to boil and cook for 15 minutes.

Add 1 Tbl cumin and 1/2 tsp oregano. Reduce heat to light boil and add half of the garlic. Add half of the chili powder, and cook for 10 minutes.

Add tomato sauce and pulp from the dried peppers and remaining garlic. Add any remaining beef broth and chicken broth for desired consistency.

Cook for one hour on medium heat stirring occasionally. Add remaining chili powders and cumin. Simmer for 25 minutes on low to medium heat, stirring occasionally.

Turn up heat to light boil and add Tabasco pepper sauce, salt to taste, brown sugar and juice of lime. Simmer on medium heat.

Dr of BBQ
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RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine - Sun, 02/25/07 6:03 PM
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Here is a version of a typical Illinois chilli recipe referred to as Tavern Chilli.
Jack

4-Lbs course Ground Beef
4 ½-5-Lbs Suet
4.4 Oz Chilli Powder
2- Tablespoons Salt
¾-Tablespoon Garlic Powder
1-Teaspoon Ground Oregano
3- Teaspoons Cumin
2-Teaspoons Red Pepper
Brooks Hot Chilli Beans

Rend Suet in one cup of water. Boil stirring constantly and continue until it stops foaming, remove the foam off the top as you go. Set aside and let cool.

Add the meat and break it up into small pieces as it cooks Add the spices and continue to stir and crumble the meat during the cooking process. Just before the meat is done add the rendered suet. Continue to stir until the entire mixture is heated.

Cook beans separately and when the beans are hot add them to the bowl first then top the beans with as much of the chilli as desired. Makes a great chilli Hot Dog also.

Some bars add additional hot spices to the suet and don’t mix the suet and meat until just before it’s served. In fact they’ll make two or 3 variations of varying degrees of heat in the individual suet’s and then you can order Med, Hot, or Firebrand and varying degrees in-between those categories.

PS Ok I don’t want to hear about heart attacks etc. I don’t care it’s my heart. Furthermore if your health conscious don’t complain about it and don’t eat it. This was served in almost every bar in Springfield; 10 years ago today at least half of them serve this recipe or something close to it.

Foodbme
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RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine - Sun, 02/25/07 8:52 PM
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quote:
Originally posted by Dr of BBQ

Here is a version of a typical Illinois chilli recipe referred to as Tavern Chilli.
Jack

4-Lbs course Ground Beef
4 ½-5-Lbs Suet
4.4 Oz Chilli Powder
2- Tablespoons Salt
¾-Tablespoon Garlic Powder
1-Teaspoon Ground Oregano
3- Teaspoons Cumin
2-Teaspoons Red Pepper
Brooks Hot Chilli Beans

Rend Suet in one cup of water. Boil stirring constantly and continue until it stops foaming, remove the foam off the top as you go. Set aside and let cool.

Add the meat and break it up into small pieces as it cooks Add the spices and continue to stir and crumble the meat during the cooking process. Just before the meat is done add the rendered suet. Continue to stir until the entire mixture is heated.

Cook beans separately and when the beans are hot add them to the bowl first then top the beans with as much of the chilli as desired. Makes a great chilli Hot Dog also.

Some bars add additional hot spices to the suet and don’t mix the suet and meat until just before it’s served. In fact they’ll make two or 3 variations of varying degrees of heat in the individual suet’s and then you can order Med, Hot, or Firebrand and varying degrees in-between those categories.

PS Ok I don’t want to hear about heart attacks etc. I don’t care it’s my heart. Furthermore if your health conscious don’t complain about it and don’t eat it. This was served in almost every bar in Springfield; 10 years ago today at least half of them serve this recipe or something close to it.


The problem is, doun here in AZ we have a hard time finding Suet. Any Suggestions[|)][|)]

Dr of BBQ
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RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine - Mon, 02/26/07 12:17 AM
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quote:
Originally posted by Foodbme
The problem is, doun here in AZ we have a hard time finding Suet. Any Suggestions


Not knowing the area no but my first shot would be a grocery store that still cuts meat. That means no chain stores and it may force you to go to some kind of rural area butcher shop. But I'm thinking ranchers would know someone that has suet. Sorry I can't be of more help.I do know if you get good suet (white) rather than bad suet (yellow) it makes killer greasy Illinois chilli.
Jack@DrofBBQ.com
PS Or find someone as close as possible to get it shipped to you frozen.

Dr of BBQ
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RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine - Wed, 03/28/07 6:26 PM
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Cooks Illustrated
Making Great Chili
The secret is using large cubes of beef chuck and a mixture of fresh and oven-roasted chiles.

The Problem: One of the biggest challenges we faced when we decided to try and come up with the "best" recipe for chili was to narrow the competition. There are so many different kinds of chili (Texas, New Mexico, Cincinnati, to name a few) that we knew we had to decide on a particular style and go from there.

The Goal: Our choice was Texas chili, a beanless dish that goes heavy on the meat (usually beef) and favors the use of ancho chiles, which have a deep, sweet, raisiny flavor. Once we knew (sort of) what we were after, we could concentrate on making a great bowl of Texas-style chili.

The Solution: While ancho chile powder will do, we got the best chile flavor by toasting and grinding fresh chiles. Flavor is also improved by adding bacon, which lends the dish sweetness and smokiness. Thickening helps, too, making for a smoother, softer, and more appealing sauce. (This can be accomplished with cornstarch, but masa harina--a type of corn flour made from sun- or fire-dried corn kernels--is preferred; unlike the cornstarch, it actually adds flavor while it thickens.)

One final ingredient that makes for a really great chili is time--chili improves from an overnight rest that gives the flavors a chance to blend and mellow.

Chili Con Carne
To ensure the best chile flavor, I recommend toasting whole dried chiles and grinding them in a mini-chopper or spice-dedicated coffee grinder, all of which takes only ten (very well-spent) minutes. Select dried chiles that are moist and pliant, like dried fruit. Count on trimming one-half to a full pound of waste from your chuck roast, so start with a four-pound roast to end up with three to three-and-a-half pounds of beef cubes. For hotter chili, boost the heat with a pinch of cayenne, a dash of hot pepper sauce, or crumbled pequin chiles near the end of cooking. Serve the chili with any of the following side dishes: warm pinto or kidney beans, corn bread or chips, corn tortillas or tamales, rice, biscuits, or just plain crackers, and top with any of the following garnishes: chopped fresh cilantro leaves, minced white onion, diced avocado, shredded cheddar or jack cheese, or sour cream.

Serves 6

3 tablespoons ancho chili powder or 3 medium pods (about 1/2 ounce), toasted and ground (see illustrations below)
3 tablespoons New Mexico chili powder or 3 medium pods (about 3/4 ounce), toasted and ground
2 tablespoons cumin seeds , toasted in a dry skillet over medium heat until fragrant, about 4 minutes, and ground
2 teaspoons dried oregano , preferably Mexican
7 1/2 cups water , divided
1 beef chuck roast (4-pounds), trimmed of excess fat and cut into 1-inch cubes
2 teaspoons table salt , plus extra for seasoning
8 ounces bacon (7 or 8 slices), cut into 1/4-inch pieces
1 medium onion , minced (about 1 cup)
5 medium cloves garlic , minced
4 - 5 small jalapeño chiles , cored, seeded, and minced
1 cup crushed tomatoes (canned), or plain tomato sauce
2 tablespoons lime juice from 1 medium lime
5 tablespoons masa harina or 3 tablespoons cornstarch
Ground black pepper


1. Mix chili powders, cumin, and oregano in small bowl and stir in 1/2 cup water to form thick paste; set aside. Toss beef cubes with salt; set aside.

2. Fry bacon in large, heavy soup kettle or Dutch oven over medium-low heat until fat renders and bacon crisps, about 10 minutes. Remove bacon with slotted spoon to paper towel-lined plate; pour all but 2 teaspoons fat from pot into small bowl; set aside. Increase heat to medium-high; sauté meat in four batches until well-browned on all sides, about 5 minutes per batch, adding additional 2 teaspoons bacon fat to pot as necessary. Reduce heat to medium, add 3 tablespoons bacon fat to now-empty pan. Add onion; sauté until softened, 5 to 6 minutes. Add garlic and jalapeño; sauté until fragrant, about 1 minute. Add chili paste; sauté until fragrant, 2 to 3 minutes. Add reserved bacon and browned beef, crushed tomatoes or tomato sauce, lime juice, and 7 cups water; bring to simmer. Continue to cook at a steady simmer until meat is tender and juices are dark, rich, and starting to thicken, about 2 hours.

3. Mix masa harina with 2/3 cup water (or cornstarch with 3 tablespoons water) in a small bowl to form smooth paste. Increase heat to medium; stir in paste and simmer until thickened, 5 to 10 minutes. Adjust seasoning generously with salt and ground black pepper. Serve immediately, or preferably, cool slightly, cover, and refrigerate overnight or for up to 5 days. Reheat before serving.

STEP BY STEP: Toasting and Preparing the Chiles

1. Dried chile pods toasted in a 350-degree oven for about 6 minutes become fragrant and puffed.
2. When cool enough to handle, remove stems and seeds from the pods, rip them into pieces, and process until powdery, 30 to 45 seconds.

Smoky Chipotle Chili Con Carne
Grill-smoking the meat, a technique from food writers John and Matt Lewis Thorne, authors of the Serious Pig (North Point Press, 1996), in combination with chipotle chiles give this chili a distinct but not overwhelming, smoky flavor. Make sure you start with a chuck roast that is at least three inches thick. The grilling is meant to flavor the meat by searing the surface and smoking it lightly, not to cook it.

Serves 6

Beef Rub
4 medium cloves garlic
2 teaspoons table salt
1 beef chuck roast (4-pounds)
2 - 3 tablespoons New Mexico chili powder

Chili
3 tablespoons ancho chili powder or 3 medium pods (about 1/2 ounce), toasted and ground (see illustrations below)
3 tablespoons New Mexico chili powder or 3 medium pods (about 3/4 ounce), toasted and ground
2 tablespoons cumin seeds , toasted in a small dry skillet over medium heat until fragrant, about 4 minutes, and ground
2 teaspoons dried oregano , preferably Mexican
1/2 cup water
8 ounces bacon (7 or 8 slices), cut into 1/4-inch pieces
1 medium onion , minced (about 1 cup)
5 cloves garlic , minced (about 1 cup)
5 chipotle chiles en adobo , minced
1 cup crushed tomatoes (canned) or plain tomato sauce
2 tablespoons lime juice from 1 medium lime
5 tablespoons masa harina or 3 tablespoons cornstarch
Table salt and ground black pepper

1. To Prepare Meat: Puree garlic cloves with salt. Rub intact chuck roast with puree, and sprinkle evenly with New Mexico chili powder; cover and set aside. Meanwhile, build hot fire. When you can hold your hand 5 inches above grill surface for no more than 3 seconds, spread hot coals to area about the size of roast. Open bottom grill vents, scatter one cup soaked mesquite or hickory wood chips over hot coals, and set grill rack in place. Grill roast over hot coals, opening lid vents three-quarters of the way and covering so that vents are opposite bottom vents to draw smoke through and around roast. Sear meat until all sides are dark and richly colored, about 12 minutes per side. Remove roast to bowl; when cool to the touch, trim and cut into 1-inch cubes, reserving juices.

2. For Chili: Mix chili powders, cumin, and oregano in small bowl and stir in 1/2 cup water to form thick paste; set aside.

3. Fry bacon in large, heavy soup kettle or Dutch oven over medium-low heat until fat renders and bacon crisps, about 10 minutes. Remove bacon with slotted spoon to paper towel-lined plate; pour all but 3 teaspoons fat from pot into small bowl; set aside. Increase heat to medium. Add onion; sauté until softened, 5 to 6 minutes. Add garlic and chipotles; sauté until fragrant, about 1 minute. Add chili paste; sauté until fragrant, 2 to 3 minutes. Add reserved bacon and beef (with juices), crushed tomatoes or tomato sauce, lime juice, and 7 cups water; bring to simmer. Continue to cook at a steady simmer until meat is tender and juices are dark, rich, and starting to thicken, about 2 hours.

4. Mix masa harina with 2/3 cup water (or cornstarch with 3 tablespoons water) in a small bowl to form smooth paste. Increase heat to medium; stir in paste and simmer until thickened, 5 to 10 minutes. Adjust seasoning generously with salt and ground black pepper. Serve immediately, or preferably, cool slightly, cover, and refrigerate overnight or for up to 5 days. Reheat before serving.

STEP BY STEP: Toasting and Preparing the Chiles

1. Dried chile pods toasted in a 350-degree oven for about 6 minutes become fragrant and puffed.
2. When cool enough to handle, remove stems and seeds from the pods, rip them into pieces, and process until powdery, 30 to 45 seconds.
Jack@DrofBBQ.com


MikeS.
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RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine - Sun, 04/8/07 12:20 AM
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As threatened - here is my all purpose chilli recipe. The ground chuck is, of course, chilli grind.


MMMMM----- Recipe via Meal Master (tm) v8.06

Title: The Recipe
Categories: Beef, Chilli, Stews
Yield: 6 Quarts

115 g Kidney Suet (4 oz)
5 lb Ground chuck
3 Ribs celery
16 oz Can chicken broth
48 oz Can tomato juice; Red Gold
1 1/2 tb vinegar
1/2 tb Prune juice
1 tb Arrowroot (opt) -=IN=-
2 tb Tap water (opt)

MMMMM------------------------FIRST-DUMP------------------------------
10 g Jalapeno; powdered *
35 g Beef base
115 g Chilli powder **
65 g Cumin
20 g Brown sugar 20 g
15 g Onion powder (granules)
15 g garlic powder (granules)
25 g Salt
5 g Oregano; dried, crumbled
5 g White pepper
10 g Worcestershire powder ***

MMMMM------------------------SECOND DUMP-----------------------------
25 g Chilliman chilli mix +
10 g Cumin 10 g
2 g Salt (1/2 ts)

MMMMM-------------------------OPTIONAL-------------------------------
3 48 oz Cn Brooks Chilli Beans

* Or use two FAT jalapeno chilies, diced fine, no seeds.
Adjust this according to your taste for heat. This recipe
sometimes gets me marked off by the judges for "too hot".

** Baron's #5640 (aka Spicecraft) is a 5# container. It is
also available as #5610 in a 1# container.

*** 6 tablespoons of liquid Lea & Perrins Worcestershire.

+ Since Chilliman was sold their chilli mix is not the same
so I have been using Mexene (Bruce Foods) as a very nice
replacement

Chop the celery and blenderise it with the can of chicken
broth until the chunks are pureed. Transfer to a jar.

Measure and weigh out the dry spice ingredients and mix
together in a container (a baggie will do).

Render the suet in the chilli pot and add ground chuck.
Cook meat stirring often to break up clumps until all the
pink is gone from the meat.

Add the beef base, tomato juice and the pureed celery in
chicken broth that you fixed the night previously. Bring
to a nice boil.

Add your first dump of spices and reduce heat to a medium
simmer. Stir often and cook until the fat begins to render
from the meat. Add the vinegar and the prune juice and
continue to cook and stir.

After an hour and a half turn off your stove and let the
chilli rest for an hour. You may use this time to
contemplate your navel or to skim off the rendered oil
(reserving it to pop popcorn in at home - or to add back
to the chilli after the judges get done with it) or other
necessary cook-off activities such as washing up your
utensils and/or skulking around and spying on the other
cooks.

About thirty minutes before turn-in time - fire up your
stove and bring the chilli back to a nice simmer. Add the
second spice dump. Continue to cook and stir and taste.
Make any final adjustments.

You can put the chilli in the ice box overnight if cooking
this recipe at home. It works even better that way. But,
we must make some compromises to keep to a schedule at a
cook-off.

Remember that optional stuff we mentioned in the
ingredients??? If you feel that the chilli is too "thin"
use that optional TB of arrowroot mixed in the 2 TB of
water, stirring it in at least 15 minutes before turn in
to give it a chance to thicken things up.

Beans are permissible at home - but, not at a chilli cook
off. Leave out the suet at a chilli cook-off. However, it
makes an excellent pot of chilli truly wonderful.

MM Format by Dave Drum - 17 January 2005

MMMMM



A couple of notes here - this recipe is now one I consider to be my own. However, like almost all recipes is is based on experience, observation and the work of others. I started out with a chilli supper recipe developed by my friend Les Eastep.

I like my chilli with a fair amount of oil ... but, chilli cook-off judges will mark you off for that. And oil is what carries a lot of the flavour. So, if I don't add it back to the pot after turning in my judges cup - I take it home and make the most delightful chilli popcorn you could imagine.

tiki
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RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine - Sun, 04/8/07 5:19 AM
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MikeS says---"I like my chilli with a fair amount of oil ... but, chilli cook-off judges will mark you off for that. And oil is what carries a lot of the flavour. So, if I don't add it back to the pot after turning in my judges cup - I take it home and make the most delightful chilli popcorn you could imagine"

I DO NOT COOK FOR JUDGES!--just for FRIENDS & FAMILY!

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RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine - Mon, 04/30/07 1:02 AM
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The sounds very good. My dad has an awesome chili recipe, though I'm sure it has a lot less ingridients. Basically red beans, ground beef, green peppers, onion, tomatos(diced), tomato paste and pinches of all sorts of spices. I'm still trying to get out of him exact amounts and what spices, but he won't tell me. XP

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RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine - Wed, 06/6/07 10:08 AM
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The chili was excellent, Ed. Very flavorful.

I made some minor modifications (more garlic, dried New Mexican reds with the anchos and chipotles, Bell's Porter, more worcestershire and slightly less tomato sauce). I also had to sneak in the olives, celery, and mushrooms, so as not to offend purists.

I imagine it would be equally tasty with venison. Great stuff.



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RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine - Wed, 06/6/07 12:48 PM
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Lazy Chili

1lb ground beef
1lb stew meat cut into small cubes
1 28oz can tomatoes (I crush by hand and cut out tops - crushed tomatoes would work too)
1 6oz can tomato paste
1 bag frozen chopped onion
1 bag frozen chopped green peppers
1 28oz can Kidney beans
liberal spoonfuls of chopped garlic
chili powder
onion powder
garlic powder

Cook ground beef with onion/garlic powders and a good dash of hot sauce. Drain well. Repeat with stew meat.

Cook onions, peppers in a little olive oil until done to your liking. Add garlic. Add meat and 1/2 bottle of chili powder. Stir until blended and tomatoes and tomato paste.

After 30 minutes or so, add chili powder to taste. Add hot sauce to your liking. Simmer 1 - 3 hours

Extra beans (1 or 2 cans) can be added to extend the recipe without making it seem to cheap.

Thanks,

Kevin

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RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine - Wed, 07/25/07 1:16 PM
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A bowl of red - Texas vs New Mexico

When you come across the border from Texas to New Mexico, everything changes.

As a transplanted Texan living in New Mexico, I make two different types of red, Texas Red chili and New Mexico chile.

The diffence is in the meat and chile powder. For Texas Red I like to use chile grind ground chuck and use a light chile powder. For New Mexico chile, I like to use cubed pork with Chimayo red chile powder.

I use my Texas Red for my chili dogs and chili cheese fries. I just sit down with a big bowl of New Mexico chile with a fresh made tortilla and enjoy. I do not put beans in my Texas Red or New Mexico Chile, but will have a bowl on the side for anyone who wants them.

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RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine - Sun, 08/5/07 3:59 AM
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quote:
Originally posted by roossy90

quote:
Originally posted by Scallion1

I'm not going to comment on these recipes; I'm sure a lot of them are great.

But several of them hit a nerve: there's absolutely no reason to use extra virgin olive oil to saute the vegetables. It goes against my chef's hatred of waste. The best palate ever born couldn't tell the difference between using xvoo and "pure" olive oil, or, for that matter, Wesson oil, in these circumstances.

I renege: I will comment. The following have no place in making chili: olives. tomato soup. liquid smoke. vinegar. dried parsely/dried cilantro (should both be outlawed). chicken stock. cheeses. store-bought chopped garlic (should be outlawed). green beans. cauliflower. pizza sauce.

Go ahead and scream. You may be making something that tastes good, but it sure ain't chili.


Ok.. lets hear your recipe for "chili"
As this online dictionary puts it:...chil·i also chil·e or chil·li (ch#301;l'ç)
n., pl. chil·ies also chil·es or chil·lies.
The pungent fresh or dried fruit of any of several cultivated varieties of capsicum, used especially as a flavoring in cooking. Also called chili pepper.
Chili con carne.
Chili
A hearty, thick soup often made with meat and/or beans in a tomato base
chili con car·ne (k#335;n kär'nç)
n.
A highly spiced dish made of red peppers, meat, and often beans.

[Spanish : chile, chili + con, with + carne, meat.]


Let's see yours...


I'm for that!! It's easy to criticize, but let's see your's scallion1!
I have heard that chili with beans isn't really chili but ROOSY makes a great point! This is America, the greatest melting pot on the planet! Why can't my chili have beans, tomato juice, or whatever I want? Just goes to show what narrow minds some people have in regards to cooking.

David O.

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RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine - Tue, 08/7/07 8:11 PM
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quote:
Originally posted by tiki

MikeS says---"I like my chilli with a fair amount of oil ... but, chilli cook-off judges will mark you off for that. And oil is what carries a lot of the flavour. So, if I don't add it back to the pot after turning in my judges cup - I take it home and make the most delightful chilli popcorn you could imagine"

I DO NOT COOK FOR JUDGES!--just for FRIENDS & FAMILY!


Actually that's my recipe that Mike moved here from another thread. And I promise you that if you have somewhere around U$500 in your cooking set-up (tent, stove(s), coolers, etc) and paid a U$42 membership to ICS (or U$15 to CASI), a U$35 (or thereabouts) entry fee to the chilli cook off, spent around U$50 for meat, spices, etc. and transport to the cook-off, and maybe taken a Saturday off work, losing over a hundred bucks in pay - you'll at least take the judges into consideration.


Howdy Doodat
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RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine - Tue, 08/7/07 8:19 PM
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quote:
Originally posted by Foodbme


The problem is, doun here in AZ we have a hard time finding Suet. Any Suggestions[|)][|)]



Any grocery or stupormarkup with a service meat counter (real, live butchers) should be able to fix you up. Try to get kidney (white) suet as it has a better flavour. Tallow (yellow suet) is better than no suet at all - but, the kidney suet is best.

Howdy Doodat
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RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine - Tue, 08/7/07 8:44 PM
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quote:
Originally posted by Dr of BBQ

Here is a version of a typical Illinois chilli recipe referred to as Tavern Chilli.
Jack

4-Lbs course Ground Beef
4 �-5-Lbs Suet

PS Ok I don�t want to hear about heart attacks etc. I don�t care it�s my heart. Furthermore if your health conscious don�t complain about it and don�t eat it. This was served in almost every bar in Springfield; 10 years ago today at least half of them serve this recipe or something close to it.




OK, you must, at least, be from Illinois since you spell chilli in the correct way. If you are still in Spring-A-Leak can you direct me to saloons which serve a decent bowl of red???

You recipe looks a lot like the old Lawson's Tavern recipe - but, Lawson's is long gone. As are Charlie Zaubi's, Schoenle's, etc. in fact most of the "old school" saloons where one could get an au gratin dish with double dipped Springfield Tavern chilli or with tamales added for a double header. Delaney's out north of Lincoln Park serves a decent bowl of chilli - but, it ain't old school Tavern Chilli. Spammy's in the old Charlie Zaubi location claims to have the McCoy - but, their chilli wouldn't even make vegetable soup - and would likely gag a skunk out of a garbage can. Kie Richards went to that great chilli pot in the sky and his was about the last saloon that I know of in town serving tavern-style greasy red.

Best bowl of good, old fashion, greasy tavern chilli is dipped up by Linda Lou at Joe's Chili (note incorrect spelling) Bowl in the Town and Country Shopping Centre. It's also served at the Dublin Pub next door so I suppose it does qualify as a tavern chilli.

If you know any places in Springfield, IL that serve good chilli, please, pull my coat and whisper the information in my shell-like ear. If you are still in the Central IL area and would be interested in eating lunch on Thursdays with a bunch of chilli cooks (at a different place each week) send your e-mail address to howdy.doodat (at) gmail (dot) com and I will see that you get on the mailing list for the lunch schedule.



unabashed
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RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine - Wed, 08/8/07 2:47 AM
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quote:
Originally posted by Scallion1

I'm not going to comment on these recipes; I'm sure a lot of them are great.

But several of them hit a nerve: there's absolutely no reason to use extra virgin olive oil to saute the vegetables. It goes against my chef's hatred of waste. The best palate ever born couldn't tell the difference between using xvoo and "pure" olive oil, or, for that matter, Wesson oil, in these circumstances.

I renege: I will comment. The following have no place in making chili: olives. tomato soup. liquid smoke. vinegar. dried parsely/dried cilantro (should both be outlawed). chicken stock. cheeses. store-bought chopped garlic (should be outlawed). green beans. cauliflower. pizza sauce.

Go ahead and scream. You may be making something that tastes good, but it sure ain't chili.

this is the only post on this entire thread that hit a nerve with me!!!
1st about using XV olive oil or reg. olive oil there is a very big taste difference....you must not have a pallet!!!!plus its healthier for ya.
one person said 3tbl chili powder and 1tbl cumin and you have chili EXACTLY thats the base flaver after that its up to you what to add what you like.....
as for the texan chili well....the only chili i like without beans is for my hotdogs no offence but im east coast thats how ive always had it growing up....
heres a recipe/or ingrediant that will probally upset scallion hope it doesn't but check this out....
i was working for a club in blue ridge summit pa we had a oyster feed...well the boys ordered a few to many oysters for the feed....
THIS IS A TRUE STORY lmao i shucked a bushel of them and made my chili (basic)but with no meat/salt.... added a quart or so of the liquer and turned off the heat and added the oysters.
they loved it till this day when i see someone from the club they ask for the recipe HOW YA DO THAT??? im thinking to my self rather than chucking a bushel of fresh oysters(that these jerks are gonna add to my food cost at the end of the month)i got rid of them all this was like a 30 gallon batch of chili i believe...and i quit there a month later after i cleaned up thier kitchen fired all the slack retrained everyone else got a system going they figured they didnt need the high priced guy from hanover/york pa....the only reson i didn't say chef is cause i learned it all the hard way. they don't teach ya in them culinary schools about what happens if 3 line cooks call off on a friday night.....thats another story and i feel im babaling....SORRY...bottem line food is food if you like it do it might be the next big thing like the buffalo wing ahhh.... the french dip.....
bye for now
ron in pa

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RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine - Thu, 08/16/07 12:59 PM
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The best i ever made.

Ingredients
6 ounces hot turkey Italian sausage
2 cups chopped onion
1 cup chopped green bell pepper
8 garlic cloves, minced
1 pound ground sirloin
2 jalapeño pepper, chopped
2 tablespoons chili powder
2 tablespoons brown sugar
1 tablespoon ground cumin
3 tablespoons tomato paste
1 teaspoon dried oregano
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1/4 teaspoon salt
2 bay leaves
1 1/2 cups Merlot or other fruity red wine
2 (28-ounce) cans Muir Glen Fire roasted tomatoes, undrained and coarsely chopped
2 (15-ounce) cans Progresso kidney beans, drained
shredded sharp cheddar cheese


Preparation
Heat a large Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Remove casings from sausage. Add sausage, onion, and the next 4 ingredients (onion through jalapeño) to pan; cook 8 minutes or until sausage and beef are browned, stirring to crumble.
Add chili powder and the next 7 ingredients (chili powder through bay leaves), and cook for 1 minute, stirring constantly. Stir in wine, tomatoes, and kidney beans; bring to a boil. Cover, reduce heat, and simmer 1 hour, stirring occasionally.

Uncover and cook for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. Discard the bay leaves. Sprinkle each serving with cheddar cheese.


Howdy Doodat
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RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine - Thu, 08/16/07 3:33 PM
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quote:
Originally posted by ocerg

The best i ever made.

Ingredients
6 ounces hot turkey Italian sausage
2 cups chopped onion
1 cup chopped green bell pepper
8 garlic cloves, minced
1 pound ground sirloin
2 jalape�o pepper, chopped
2 tablespoons chili powder
2 tablespoons brown sugar
1 tablespoon ground cumin
3 tablespoons tomato paste
1 teaspoon dried oregano
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1/4 teaspoon salt
2 bay leaves
1 1/2 cups Merlot or other fruity red wine
2 (28-ounce) cans Muir Glen Fire roasted tomatoes, undrained and coarsely chopped
2 (15-ounce) cans Progresso kidney beans, drained
shredded sharp cheddar cheese




Where's The
BEEF?!?!?

[|)]

PapaJoe8
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RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine - Thu, 08/16/07 5:55 PM
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Ocerg, welcome to Roadfood! The chili threads here, and the links folks give, are the best on the net IMHO. Read it all if you can find the time. Your addition has made it even better.

I have made a few good pots of chili using plain/ol ground turkey. Your idea for the turkey Itailan sausage, and the Merlot, are a stroke of G*^$@. It sounds great! I will try it first chance I get. I think I will save the beans to serve on the side though.

Oh, Howdy is a chili purest. Not that there is anything wrong w/ that. He DOES know his chili!
Joe

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RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine - Thu, 08/16/07 6:14 PM
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quote:
Originally posted by PapaJoe8

Ocerg, welcome to Roadfood! The chili threads here, and the links folks give, are the best on the net IMHO. Read it all if you can find the time. Your addition has made it even better.

I have made a few good pots of chili using plain/ol ground turkey. Your idea for the turkey Itailan sausage, and the Merlot, are a stroke of G*^$@. It sounds great! I will try it first chance I get. I think I will save the beans to serve on the side though.

Oh, Howdy is a chili purest. Not that there is anything wrong w/ that. He DOES know his chili!
Joe



It's just that the fennel and sage in Italian sausage (turkey or pork) is sooooo wrong for chilli. I did spot the pound of sirloin in the ingredients list ... but, tasting the results of the recipe in my head tells me UH-OH!! Houston, we have a problem.

I have made semi-successful batches of chilli using turkey or chicken as the meat. I've also made chilli to good effect with lamb, mutton, pork, venison, snake and/or raccoon on the ingredients list.

But, the fennel (especially) and the sage in 6 oz of good Dago sausage takes the recipe out of the realm of chilli into a semi-spicy beef and sausage stew w/beenz.

I might even make it some day - I do weird stuff like that from time to time. If I can source the Muir Glen 'maters which sound like a Califunky thing. Not anything I've seen around here in the Great American Outback.

I have no doubt that it's tasty - sure looks that way. But, tasty or not, it ain't chilli

PapaJoe8
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RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine - Fri, 08/17/07 11:28 AM
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Ocreg, did your sausage have fennel? I see Itialan sausage w/ or w/o it. I have uses 1/3 Owens Itialan pork sausage and 2/3 chuck, and it turned out good. Not sure if that has fennel?
Joe

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RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine - Fri, 08/17/07 2:15 PM
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Thanks! This is one great site.

I use Shady Brook Farms Hot italian Sausage. 92% Fat-free

Ingredients:
Turkey, water, salt, spices, sugar, paprika, collagen casing.

In all the years that i've made it i never tasted the fennel, here in NJ the Shop-Rite super markets carry the Muir Glen fire roasted brand the tomatoes actually have a nice smoke flavor with bits of charred flesh, the ground sirloin i grind myself from sirloin tips from the costco chain. This recipe has been a hit at every party and fishing trip that i bring it to everyone loves it the sweetness of the brown sugar and merlot balance well with the smokiness of the fire roasted tomatoes and heat of the hot peppers and sausage. Sometimes i add an extra cayenne pepper or 2 to really kick it up, but that's usually when i make it just for me. It's not that high in fat and is actually a very lean chili packed with great flavor. I totaled up the calories and with a tablespoon of the chedder cheese
comes to about 375 calories per serving.

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RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine - Fri, 08/17/07 2:25 PM
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Inspired by that first recipe, I thought I would share this with everyone, the winning recipe from the time-out Chicago chili cookoff, created by me...

8 rib-eye steaks
4 lbs ground chuck beef
1 pkg bacon, chopped
4 jalapeno peppers
2 red bell peppers
2 green bell peppers
2 Anaheim peppers
2 poblano peppers
1 orange pepper
1 cubanelle pepper
2 medium onions, chopped
1 bunch green onions, chopped
8 sticks celery, chopped
6 cloves garlic chopped
2 32-oz cans of tomato sauce
2 cans stewed diced tomatoes
2 cans Tex-Mex pinto beans with juice
1 can beer (I use High Life)
1 can beef broth
1 cup fresh salsa
8 tbl of mild chili powder
1 package of Chili man's Chili seasoning
1 small can of diced pimento
2 small cans of chopped green chili's
2 tsp of pimenton
1 pkg of New Mexico chili powder
2 tbl ground cumin
1 tbl cayenne pepper
1 tbl ground chipotle powder
1 tbl hot paprika
1 tsp ground mustard
1 tsp white pepper
1 tsp black pepper
Adobo seasoning
1 tsp Mexican oregano
1 tbl Worcestershire sauce
Lawry’s seasoning salt to taste
Hot sauce if you like it spicy

Set grill for high and grill rib-eyes about 4 minutes on each side. Let cool. Proccedd to grill all the peppers and once blackened nicely chop them up.

Cook bacon pieces in large skillet until crisp, remove pieces from skillet and set aside then drain all but 1 tbl of the bacon fat. Add the peppers, onions, celery and garlic to the pot and sprinkle salt, pepper and Worcestershire sauce into the pot and mix and cook until onions are translucent.

Remove veggies from pan. Add ground beef to skillet. While meat is browning, cut rib-eyes into small chunks and remove any gristle.

When the beef is done drain the fat. Combine veggies, ground beef and rib-eye meat in a large stockpot. Add remaining spices, beer, beef broth, tomato sauce and stewed tomatoes and mix well.

Bring to a boil then simmer. Let cook uncovered for 4 hours stirring every now and then. After 4 hours, add the bacon pieces, salsa and beans and stir them through. Adjust seasonings to taste and let heat through for 10 minutes.

craven.sean
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RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine - Sun, 08/19/07 10:43 PM
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Hate to say it but I have to go with the "chili is a generic term crowd." Like it or not, usage is what determines the validity of a word in the long run. I sympathize with your pain, but it would probably be a good idea to recognize the inevitable and suck it up...

On the other hand, incessant bitching doesn't cost anything and it's a great hobby, right up there with tropical fish and vehicular homicide. Don't let me rain on your charade.

I will confess that there were a number of times that I looked at a recipe on this list and recoiled in horror... only to think it through and decide that I'd at least like to try a bowl before rendering judgment. This is obviously a ripe field for the display of eccentricity, but in my experience once you get certain flavors in the mix the essential nature of chili goes away and you wind up with a sort of muddy spaghetti sauce if you're lucky. I've got an amusingly appalling cookbook with a recipe for Chinese Chili by Buddy Hackett. It contains canned bamboo shoots and water chestnuts. Brrr...

I've been experimenting with chili since I was given a bowl of roast beef chili as a child. It was a restaurant meal and I'm pretty sure it was the result of having to find a use for leftovers but it was incredible. So I had to try and figure out how to beat it. (I'm working on giving up false modesty. I'll deal with the arrogance after I've got the FM whipped.)

These days I have two patterns for chili. One is very loosely based on the Stern's recipe for Cincinnati-style chili and is intended for use on hot dogs and such. Just gave my dad three pounds of it for his birthday and my guitar buddy half of what I had left. They both glowed, I'm here to tell you... Thank you, Sterns!

The other is a little something I call Chili con Carnage. It's a technique, not a recipe, and is dependent on a number of things that might not be readily accessible to everyone, but for the sake of curiosity and inspiration, here's how I do it. (As a side note, I once had a friend diagnosed with anemia. I gave her a substantial supply of the chili and she ate it every day for a couple of weeks. The next time she saw the doc he was amazed by her complete recovery. She credits the chili...)

The first ingredient is strong meat stock, the kind that turns into hard rubber at fridge temperatures. I'm in the habit of simmering meat in stock, freezing the stock, and then cooking the next chuck roast/pork shoulder/etc. in the same stock. I do this for as long as a year. Just meat, salt, and water -- if you use any seasonings the flavors accumulate in an unsavory fashion. (This probably is closer to a symptom than a technique...)

So I start off the chili by popping a bunch of meat into the crock pot and covering it with the stock. What I use depends on what looks good in the butcher counter, but I like to use chuck roast and then fill in the gaps with stuff like shank and oxtail. When I'm feeling dangerous I throw in a ham hock. (If the people who made oxtail and flank expensive ever find out how good chuck actually is I may have to switch over to an Anthro-vegetarian diet for economy's sake.) I let it simmer on low overnight -- at the lowest setting the meat cooks fork-tender, the fat and connective tissue melt, and the meat still stays pink through.

The next day I let the crock pot full of dead animal parts cool, then pop it into the refrigerator overnight to give the fat a chance to rise and solidify for easy removal.

The next day I go out hunting for chilies. I get a mix of everything that wants to go in the pot, if you know what I mean. I use a mix of fresh and dried chilies. I get a lot more fresh chilies than you'd think, including a few pounds of red, orange, and/or yellow bell peppers.

Back at the kitchen I degrease the meat and put the meat itself into a separate pot, removing any bones and visible chunks of fat and then shredding the meat with my hands. No chopping, no cutting. It's the long disintegrated fibers that will dominate the finished dish.

Then I start processing the chilies.

The fresh chilies go into my wife's Champion juicer. You don't wanna hold your face too close to the works when you put the habeneros and scotch bonnets through there... I run the pulp through twice to get as much of the juice as possible. Dump it in with the meat. There should be a lot of it, enough to make the meat soupy. Put it in the fridge.

I do this at the same time that I'm dealing with the dried chilies. Since the dried chilies will have to cool, try and time it so that you're done with them as soon as possible, but the process includes some waiting time and while you're in the kitchen you may as well cook.

The dried chilies I look at and decide which ones are gonna be used straight and which are going to be roasted. It's about a fifty/fifty mix, tie goes to the roasted. The ones to be roasted go into a 350 oven until they get fragrant and display a few dark spots. This provides a hint of nearly-burnt flavor that is another crucial element in this death-laden hellbrew. After roasting, they go into a pot with the stock in which the meat was cooked and simmered until they're soft and rehydrated. Let them cool until they can be handled comfortably.

At that point I pull out the food mill my sister gave me with the specific intent of getting more chili out of me, put in the finest screen and run the dried chilies through it, putting the pulp into a bowl. Keep the skins and seeds out of the pulp; if you slop some in, run it through the food mill again.

Then add the pulp/stock mix to the pot with the meat and chili juices. Put it on the stove and start it simmering. Grind as much black pepper as you think it's gonna take into the pot.

Then start chopping garlic. Don't be shy -- I think in terms of multiple heads. They mellow when cooked, you know, and I stink anyway.

Then simmer and stir the chili until it boils down to a thick paste. Taste while you're doing this and adjust your levels of salt, pepper, and garlic.

At this point start adding baker's chocolate or cocoa powder. I can't for the life of me figure out why, but the bitterness of the chocolate restrains the bitterness of the chilies and gives the whole dish a smoothness and coherency it would otherwise lack.

And there you are. I've been tempted for years to add the other traditional seasonings -- cumin, onions, tomato, Mexican oregano -- but the stuff doesn't want to be messed with.(I'm a firm believer that food, like any other work of art, has its own set of intentions and the trick is listening to what the work has to say.)

I prefer to make it in large quantities and freeze most of it.

I serve it with rice and beans or a three-bean salad as my first choice. I'll use it as burrito filling. I'll spread some on a slice of bread and top it with cheese and pop it in the broiler. I'll serve it party-style with onions, sour cream, grated cheese, green onions, chopped tomatoes, avocado, etc,etc. I'll throw leftovers into beans, add homemade barbecue sauce and adjust the seasonings for ranch-type beans.

This isn't a daily occurrence, something more like a once-or-twice a year ritual.

And I'll tell you what. If it really bothers you to hear me describe it as chili, give me a functional noun and I'll use it. Or not. I have to confess that the minute I saw the slogan, "Don't mess with Texas," I immediately started trying to figure out how to mess with an entire state. If this will do the job I might not be able to resist...

(And it has to be said that Texas ain't the first state I'd choose to mess with. Too many good people there, too much good food I'd like to eat someday. California I'd love to mess with because I'm from here and I know why it deserves a little pain. Delaware also ranks high on the list... for political/economic reasons. On the other hand, they didn't put a flat-out demand for impertinence on a friggen' license-plate frame, now did they?)

snaggle
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RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine - Fri, 10/19/07 8:40 PM
0
tonights chili.
top round dry rubbed (figure it out) and charcoal seared with a redpepper.
dice red pepper, onion and leave garlic whole.
chill top round and dice large.
sautee raw pot roast meat and add veg after seared again, deglaze with a can of beer, add drops of worcestshire and balsamic, one can of tomato's one can of tomato sauce. then get bored of telling people what you made and stop typing.

DandyDog
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RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine - Wed, 01/9/08 7:13 PM
0
Chili is one of those things that everyone has their own special style, ingredient, techique and it's great to see all the different recipes. I like to take a little of everyone's ideas and come up with a delish chili or whatever.

Foodbme
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RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine - Wed, 01/9/08 8:02 PM
0
quote:
Originally posted by craven.sean

Hate to say it but I have to go with the "chili is a generic term crowd." Like it or not, usage is what determines the validity of a word in the long run. I sympathize with your pain, but it would probably be a good idea to recognize the inevitable and suck it up...

On the other hand, incessant bitching doesn't cost anything and it's a great hobby, right up there with tropical fish and vehicular homicide. Don't let me rain on your charade.

I will confess that there were a number of times that I looked at a recipe on this list and recoiled in horror... only to think it through and decide that I'd at least like to try a bowl before rendering judgment. This is obviously a ripe field for the display of eccentricity, but in my experience once you get certain flavors in the mix the essential nature of chili goes away and you wind up with a sort of muddy spaghetti sauce if you're lucky. I've got an amusingly appalling cookbook with a recipe for Chinese Chili by Buddy Hackett. It contains canned bamboo shoots and water chestnuts. Brrr...

I've been experimenting with chili since I was given a bowl of roast beef chili as a child. It was a restaurant meal and I'm pretty sure it was the result of having to find a use for leftovers but it was incredible. So I had to try and figure out how to beat it. (I'm working on giving up false modesty. I'll deal with the arrogance after I've got the FM whipped.)

These days I have two patterns for chili. One is very loosely based on the Stern's recipe for Cincinnati-style chili and is intended for use on hot dogs and such. Just gave my dad three pounds of it for his birthday and my guitar buddy half of what I had left. They both glowed, I'm here to tell you... Thank you, Sterns!

The other is a little something I call Chili con Carnage. It's a technique, not a recipe, and is dependent on a number of things that might not be readily accessible to everyone, but for the sake of curiosity and inspiration, here's how I do it. (As a side note, I once had a friend diagnosed with anemia. I gave her a substantial supply of the chili and she ate it every day for a couple of weeks. The next time she saw the doc he was amazed by her complete recovery. She credits the chili...)

The first ingredient is strong meat stock, the kind that turns into hard rubber at fridge temperatures. I'm in the habit of simmering meat in stock, freezing the stock, and then cooking the next chuck roast/pork shoulder/etc. in the same stock. I do this for as long as a year. Just meat, salt, and water -- if you use any seasonings the flavors accumulate in an unsavory fashion. (This probably is closer to a symptom than a technique...)

So I start off the chili by popping a bunch of meat into the crock pot and covering it with the stock. What I use depends on what looks good in the butcher counter, but I like to use chuck roast and then fill in the gaps with stuff like shank and oxtail. When I'm feeling dangerous I throw in a ham hock. (If the people who made oxtail and flank expensive ever find out how good chuck actually is I may have to switch over to an Anthro-vegetarian diet for economy's sake.) I let it simmer on low overnight -- at the lowest setting the meat cooks fork-tender, the fat and connective tissue melt, and the meat still stays pink through.

The next day I let the crock pot full of dead animal parts cool, then pop it into the refrigerator overnight to give the fat a chance to rise and solidify for easy removal.

The next day I go out hunting for chilies. I get a mix of everything that wants to go in the pot, if you know what I mean. I use a mix of fresh and dried chilies. I get a lot more fresh chilies than you'd think, including a few pounds of red, orange, and/or yellow bell peppers.

Back at the kitchen I degrease the meat and put the meat itself into a separate pot, removing any bones and visible chunks of fat and then shredding the meat with my hands. No chopping, no cutting. It's the long disintegrated fibers that will dominate the finished dish.

Then I start processing the chilies.

The fresh chilies go into my wife's Champion juicer. You don't wanna hold your face too close to the works when you put the habeneros and scotch bonnets through there... I run the pulp through twice to get as much of the juice as possible. Dump it in with the meat. There should be a lot of it, enough to make the meat soupy. Put it in the fridge.

I do this at the same time that I'm dealing with the dried chilies. Since the dried chilies will have to cool, try and time it so that you're done with them as soon as possible, but the process includes some waiting time and while you're in the kitchen you may as well cook.

The dried chilies I look at and decide which ones are gonna be used straight and which are going to be roasted. It's about a fifty/fifty mix, tie goes to the roasted. The ones to be roasted go into a 350 oven until they get fragrant and display a few dark spots. This provides a hint of nearly-burnt flavor that is another crucial element in this death-laden hellbrew. After roasting, they go into a pot with the stock in which the meat was cooked and simmered until they're soft and rehydrated. Let them cool until they can be handled comfortably.

At that point I pull out the food mill my sister gave me with the specific intent of getting more chili out of me, put in the finest screen and run the dried chilies through it, putting the pulp into a bowl. Keep the skins and seeds out of the pulp; if you slop some in, run it through the food mill again.

Then add the pulp/stock mix to the pot with the meat and chili juices. Put it on the stove and start it simmering. Grind as much black pepper as you think it's gonna take into the pot.

Then start chopping garlic. Don't be shy -- I think in terms of multiple heads. They mellow when cooked, you know, and I stink anyway.

Then simmer and stir the chili until it boils down to a thick paste. Taste while you're doing this and adjust your levels of salt, pepper, and garlic.

At this point start adding baker's chocolate or cocoa powder. I can't for the life of me figure out why, but the bitterness of the chocolate restrains the bitterness of the chilies and gives the whole dish a smoothness and coherency it would otherwise lack.

And there you are. I've been tempted for years to add the other traditional seasonings -- cumin, onions, tomato, Mexican oregano -- but the stuff doesn't want to be messed with.(I'm a firm believer that food, like any other work of art, has its own set of intentions and the trick is listening to what the work has to say.)

I prefer to make it in large quantities and freeze most of it.

I serve it with rice and beans or a three-bean salad as my first choice. I'll use it as burrito filling. I'll spread some on a slice of bread and top it with cheese and pop it in the broiler. I'll serve it party-style with onions, sour cream, grated cheese, green onions, chopped tomatoes, avocado, etc,etc. I'll throw leftovers into beans, add homemade barbecue sauce and adjust the seasonings for ranch-type beans.

This isn't a daily occurrence, something more like a once-or-twice a year ritual.

And I'll tell you what. If it really bothers you to hear me describe it as chili, give me a functional noun and I'll use it. Or not. I have to confess that the minute I saw the slogan, "Don't mess with Texas," I immediately started trying to figure out how to mess with an entire state. If this will do the job I might not be able to resist...

(And it has to be said that Texas ain't the first state I'd choose to mess with. Too many good people there, too much good food I'd like to eat someday. California I'd love to mess with because I'm from here and I know why it deserves a little pain. Delaware also ranks high on the list... for political/economic reasons. On the other hand, they didn't put a flat-out demand for impertinence on a friggen' license-plate frame, now did they?)


FOR GOD'S SAKE, JUST TELL US WHAT TIME IT IS, NOT HOW TO BUILD A WATCH!!!! [|)][|)][|)] I fell asleep half way through this Epistle!!

myterry2
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RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine - Wed, 01/9/08 8:42 PM
0
How about some pics of these great chili's........

DandyDog
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RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine - Wed, 01/9/08 9:20 PM
0
quote:
Originally posted by Foodbme

quote:
Originally posted by craven.sean

Hate to say it but I have to go with the "chili is a generic term crowd." Like it or not, usage is what determines the validity of a word in the long run. I sympathize with your pain, but it would probably be a good idea to recognize the inevitable and suck it up...

On the other hand, incessant bitching doesn't cost anything and it's a great hobby, right up there with tropical fish and vehicular homicide. Don't let me rain on your charade.

I will confess that there were a number of times that I looked at a recipe on this list and recoiled in horror... only to think it through and decide that I'd at least like to try a bowl before rendering judgment. This is obviously a ripe field for the display of eccentricity, but in my experience once you get certain flavors in the mix the essential nature of chili goes away and you wind up with a sort of muddy spaghetti sauce if you're lucky. I've got an amusingly appalling cookbook with a recipe for Chinese Chili by Buddy Hackett. It contains canned bamboo shoots and water chestnuts. Brrr...

I've been experimenting with chili since I was given a bowl of roast beef chili as a child. It was a restaurant meal and I'm pretty sure it was the result of having to find a use for leftovers but it was incredible. So I had to try and figure out how to beat it. (I'm working on giving up false modesty. I'll deal with the arrogance after I've got the FM whipped.)

These days I have two patterns for chili. One is very loosely based on the Stern's recipe for Cincinnati-style chili and is intended for use on hot dogs and such. Just gave my dad three pounds of it for his birthday and my guitar buddy half of what I had left. They both glowed, I'm here to tell you... Thank you, Sterns!

The other is a little something I call Chili con Carnage. It's a technique, not a recipe, and is dependent on a number of things that might not be readily accessible to everyone, but for the sake of curiosity and inspiration, here's how I do it. (As a side note, I once had a friend diagnosed with anemia. I gave her a substantial supply of the chili and she ate it every day for a couple of weeks. The next time she saw the doc he was amazed by her complete recovery. She credits the chili...)

The first ingredient is strong meat stock, the kind that turns into hard rubber at fridge temperatures. I'm in the habit of simmering meat in stock, freezing the stock, and then cooking the next chuck roast/pork shoulder/etc. in the same stock. I do this for as long as a year. Just meat, salt, and water -- if you use any seasonings the flavors accumulate in an unsavory fashion. (This probably is closer to a symptom than a technique...)

So I start off the chili by popping a bunch of meat into the crock pot and covering it with the stock. What I use depends on what looks good in the butcher counter, but I like to use chuck roast and then fill in the gaps with stuff like shank and oxtail. When I'm feeling dangerous I throw in a ham hock. (If the people who made oxtail and flank expensive ever find out how good chuck actually is I may have to switch over to an Anthro-vegetarian diet for economy's sake.) I let it simmer on low overnight -- at the lowest setting the meat cooks fork-tender, the fat and connective tissue melt, and the meat still stays pink through.

The next day I let the crock pot full of dead animal parts cool, then pop it into the refrigerator overnight to give the fat a chance to rise and solidify for easy removal.

The next day I go out hunting for chilies. I get a mix of everything that wants to go in the pot, if you know what I mean. I use a mix of fresh and dried chilies. I get a lot more fresh chilies than you'd think, including a few pounds of red, orange, and/or yellow bell peppers.

Back at the kitchen I degrease the meat and put the meat itself into a separate pot, removing any bones and visible chunks of fat and then shredding the meat with my hands. No chopping, no cutting. It's the long disintegrated fibers that will dominate the finished dish.

Then I start processing the chilies.

The fresh chilies go into my wife's Champion juicer. You don't wanna hold your face too close to the works when you put the habeneros and scotch bonnets through there... I run the pulp through twice to get as much of the juice as possible. Dump it in with the meat. There should be a lot of it, enough to make the meat soupy. Put it in the fridge.

I do this at the same time that I'm dealing with the dried chilies. Since the dried chilies will have to cool, try and time it so that you're done with them as soon as possible, but the process includes some waiting time and while you're in the kitchen you may as well cook.

The dried chilies I look at and decide which ones are gonna be used straight and which are going to be roasted. It's about a fifty/fifty mix, tie goes to the roasted. The ones to be roasted go into a 350 oven until they get fragrant and display a few dark spots. This provides a hint of nearly-burnt flavor that is another crucial element in this death-laden hellbrew. After roasting, they go into a pot with the stock in which the meat was cooked and simmered until they're soft and rehydrated. Let them cool until they can be handled comfortably.

At that point I pull out the food mill my sister gave me with the specific intent of getting more chili out of me, put in the finest screen and run the dried chilies through it, putting the pulp into a bowl. Keep the skins and seeds out of the pulp; if you slop some in, run it through the food mill again.

Then add the pulp/stock mix to the pot with the meat and chili juices. Put it on the stove and start it simmering. Grind as much black pepper as you think it's gonna take into the pot.

Then start chopping garlic. Don't be shy -- I think in terms of multiple heads. They mellow when cooked, you know, and I stink anyway.

Then simmer and stir the chili until it boils down to a thick paste. Taste while you're doing this and adjust your levels of salt, pepper, and garlic.

At this point start adding baker's chocolate or cocoa powder. I can't for the life of me figure out why, but the bitterness of the chocolate restrains the bitterness of the chilies and gives the whole dish a smoothness and coherency it would otherwise lack.

And there you are. I've been tempted for years to add the other traditional seasonings -- cumin, onions, tomato, Mexican oregano -- but the stuff doesn't want to be messed with.(I'm a firm believer that food, like any other work of art, has its own set of intentions and the trick is listening to what the work has to say.)

I prefer to make it in large quantities and freeze most of it.

I serve it with rice and beans or a three-bean salad as my first choice. I'll use it as burrito filling. I'll spread some on a slice of bread and top it with cheese and pop it in the broiler. I'll serve it party-style with onions, sour cream, grated cheese, green onions, chopped tomatoes, avocado, etc,etc. I'll throw leftovers into beans, add homemade barbecue sauce and adjust the seasonings for ranch-type beans.

This isn't a daily occurrence, something more like a once-or-twice a year ritual.

And I'll tell you what. If it really bothers you to hear me describe it as chili, give me a functional noun and I'll use it. Or not. I have to confess that the minute I saw the slogan, "Don't mess with Texas," I immediately started trying to figure out how to mess with an entire state. If this will do the job I might not be able to resist...

(And it has to be said that Texas ain't the first state I'd choose to mess with. Too many good people there, too much good food I'd like to eat someday. California I'd love to mess with because I'm from here and I know why it deserves a little pain. Delaware also ranks high on the list... for political/economic reasons. On the other hand, they didn't put a flat-out demand for impertinence on a friggen' license-plate frame, now did they?)


FOR GOD'S SAKE, JUST TELL US WHAT TIME IT IS, NOT HOW TO BUILD A WATCH!!!! [|)][|)][|)] I fell asleep half way through this Epistle!!


IMHO...I agree...too long winded....[|)]

PapaJoe8
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RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine - Wed, 01/9/08 9:57 PM
0
I liked that post. Sooo glad you guys made it bigger by quoting it twice!
joe

roossy90
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RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine - Wed, 01/9/08 10:01 PM
0
quote:
Originally posted by PapaJoe8

I liked that post. Sooo glad you guys made it bigger by quoting it twice!
joe


Hardee har har....Thats funny Papa!..
Nice to see you back again....
I knew I could find you sniffing around the chili threads!

MiamiDon
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RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine - Thu, 01/10/08 7:57 AM
0
Chili #3

4 Ancho Chiles
1 Dried Habenero Chile

4 slices thick, smoked bacon, diced

2 Tbsp. Coarsely-chopped Garlic
2 Cups Coarsely-chopped Onion

2 lbs. Chuck, 1 lb. diced, 1 lb. ground
1/2 lb. Pork, ground

1 Qt. Beef Broth
40 Oz. Canned Tomatoes

2 Tbsp. Ground Cumin
1 tsp. Dried Oregano, preferably Mexican
1 tsp. Sugar
1 tsp. Salt
1 tsp. Black Pepper

1 Green Bell Pepper, chopped
32 Oz. Canned Dark Red Kidney Beans

Pulverize chiles in a spice/coffee grinder. Alternately, chop and place in a blender with a little water, blend until finely pureed.

In a large pot or dutch oven, brown bacon. Remove with slotted spoon.

Carefully brown onion and garlic. Don't burn garlic! Remove with slotted spoon.

Brown meats. May take two batches, depending upon pot size.

Add broth, tomatoes, bacon, onions, garlic, herbs and spices.

Simmer, and stir regularly, until flavors develop, and meat is tender (2-3 hours). Add bell pepper and beans, simmer an additional thirty minutes. Adjust seasonings to taste.

Bone Man
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RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine - Wed, 01/16/08 10:01 AM
0
I searched for YEARS for the correct recipe for CINCINNATI CHILI -- finally, a friend whose great aunt worked at the original EMPRESS CHILI (the very first Cincy Chili restaurant!) for eons gave me the correct recipe (there's NO chocolate in Cincinnati Chili if it's made correctly!). I substituted canned chicken broth for the water and this one now tastes most closely like GOLD STAR CHILI. Home made chicken STOCK, de-fatted, makes it even better. Enjoy, my friends!

REAL CINCINNATI CHILI
by Patrick W. Crabtree

1 quart water (or, substitute chicken broth/stock for Gold Star)
2 pounds ground chuck (never ground round -- too lean!)
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 teaspoon ground cumin
2 large onions, chopped
1 toe fresh garlic, whole
1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 teaspoon black pepper
1 teaspoon table salt
1 1/2 teaspoons ground allspice
1/2 tablespoon cayenne (ground red) pepper
1 6-oz. can tomato paste
1 1/2 teaspoons cider vinegar
3 large bay leaves, whole
2 16-oz. cans dark red kidney beans, rinsed and drained
1 jalapeno pepper, whole
2 pounds dry Cappellini or other spaghetti
few drops of olive oil for spaghetti water

1. In a large cooking pot, break up the burger into the water or stock.

2. Add all other ingredients, except for the jalapeno pepper, the beans, (and, excepting of course the spaghetti and olive oil), and bring to a boil. Lower the heat to a simmer (slow bubble is best) and continue, covered, for 3 hours, stirring often.

3. At the end of three hours, remove the garlic toes and bay leaves and add the jalapeno pepper and simmer, covered for two more hours.

4. At the end of this time, add the drained and rinsed kidney beans and simmer, covered, for one additional hour.

5. In the last hour of cooking, start the two pounds of spaghetti in several quarts of boiling water which has been salted (1 Tbsp.) and to which a few drops of olive oil has been added.

6. When Chili and Spaghetti are done, make sure Sharp Cheddar Cheese (shredded fine) and Tabasco Sauce are available at the table.

If you try to shortcut this ancient recipe (1922) by cutting back on time, or by changing/subbing ingredients, you'll be disappointed. Also, use a thick-bottomed pot over VERY low heat, covered (barely boiling) or it will scorch.

This chili can be eaten as is, over spaghetti with toppings (cheese, Tabasco, etc.), or, as the very best hot dog/coney sauce. Cincinnati Chili purists will note that the kidney beans are heated separately at all the cincy chili outlets (Skyline, Gold Star, Empress, and Dixie) and placed on top of the respective dish, IF they use beans at all. I mix mine into the chili during the final hour or so with good results. I also toss my hot dogs right into the chili for the last half-hour of cooking time.



pat

Bone Man
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RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine - Wed, 01/16/08 10:12 AM
0
I'm sort of the "Chili Emperor" around south-central Ohio and you'll find most of my chili recipes (I don't know, about 8 or 10) here:

http://www.recipezaar.com/recipes.php?chef=196369


....and here is a chili spin-off (pseudo-Mexican) that everyone around here loves. They bug me to make it all the time. Even the neighbors "drop in" when they know that I'm making this one:


http://www.recipezaar.com/180678



My final comment is that the key to a good regular chili is partly due to using a great chili powder. Here is an outlet who use my "chili" recipes to advertise their products:

http://www.kokopelliskitchen.com/pasetechno4.html

http://www.kokopelliskitchen.com/oscachre.html

enjoy!

pat

Howdy Doodat
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RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine - Thu, 01/17/08 8:56 AM
0
quote:
Originally posted by Bone Man

I searched for YEARS for the correct recipe for CINCINNATI CHILI -- finally, a friend whose great aunt worked at the original EMPRESS CHILI (the very first Cincy Chili restaurant!) for eons gave me the correct recipe (there's NO chocolate in Cincinnati Chili if it's made correctly!). I substituted canned chicken broth for the water and this one now tastes most closely like GOLD STAR CHILI. Home made chicken STOCK, de-fatted, makes it even better. Enjoy, my friends!

REAL CINCINNATI CHILI
by Patrick W. Crabtree

1 quart water (or, substitute chicken broth/stock for Gold Star)
2 pounds ground chuck (never ground round -- too lean!)



Thanks for this. I used to have this recipe - but, it got toasted when I lost my Meal Master data base in a hard drive crash and my backup disks were corrupted.

Couple things, though - I have better luck with a very fine grind beef (i.e. 73% lean) rather than chuck grade.

What brand chilli powder do you use? They are all different and they all give a different result. I mostly use Mexene for stuff like this as Chilli Man has been changed by its new owners (Faribault Foods) and is severely lacking in all the things that makes chilli chilli.

Why would you de-fat your chicken stock? This ain't, and never will be, a heart-healthy dish. And fat carries flavour. Which is one of the reasons that I use ground beef vs ground chuck.

ENJOY!!!

"Dying is a very dull, dreary affair. And my advice to you is to have nothing whatever to do with it." -- W Somerset Maugham


MikeS.
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RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine - Mon, 03/24/08 11:10 PM
0
From a female friend at work;

White Chile

3 15-oz. cans Great Northern beans, drained
48 oz. cooked and shredded chicken breasts
1 cup chopped yellow, red, orange, and green peppers
Minimum of each
1 ½ cup chopped onion
2 jalapeno chili peppers, stemmed, seeded, and chopped (optional)
2 garlic cloves, minced
2 tsp. ground cumin
½ tsp. salt
½ tsp. dried oregano
3 ½ cups chicken broth
Shredded cheddar cheese
Tortilla chips or Tostitos

1. Combine all ingredients except cheddar cheese and chips in slow cooker.
2. Cover. Cook on Low 8-10 hours, or High 4-5 hours.
3. Ladle into bowls and top with cheese and chips.

CookieMonster84
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RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine - Thu, 04/3/08 4:27 PM
0
see i don't eat red meat - and sometimes i'll make chili with ground turkey, but i also like this vegetarian chili from parents connect:

http://www.parentsconnect.com/dishes/vegetarian_chili.jhtml

* 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
* 1 10-ounce package frozen chopped onions
* 1 10-ounce package frozen chopped green pepper
* 1 tablespoon bottled minced garlic
* ¼ cup chili powder
* 1 tablespoon ground cumin
* 1 teaspoon salt
* 2 14 and ½-ounce cans Mexican-style stewed tomatoes
* 1 15-ounce can lentils, rinsed and drained
* 1 15-ounce can red kidney beans or pinto beans, rinsed and drained
* 1 15 and ¼-ounce can whole kernel corn, drained

Dish It Out:

1. In a large pot over medium heat, heat the vegetable oil.
2. Add the onion, pepper, and garlic, and cook until tender, about 10 minutes.
3. Add the chili powder, cumin and salt, stirring well to mix. Cook for 2 minutes to release flavors, stirring frequently.
4. Add the tomatoes, lentils, kidney beans or pinto beans, and corn, stirring well to mix.
5. Bring to a boil, cover, reduce the heat to low, and simmer for 10 minutes.

* Chili powder and cumin are the "hot-makers" in this recipe. Feel free to adjust them, according to your tolerance.
* Serve the individual bowls of chili with shredded sharp Cheddar cheese, a dollop of sour cream and/or a scoop of leftover rice on top.

SeamusD
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RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine - Mon, 05/5/08 5:07 PM
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I guess I make your basic run-of-the-mill chili with beans (black, red, and dark red kidney), the only thing I may do differently is throw in a pound or two of hot chorizo when I can get my hands on it. I cook it up with the ground beef or cubed steak, garlic, onions and green peppers, then throw in tomato paste and make a thick ragu, and let it almost start to burn while stirring it around, then put the canned whole and crushed tomatoes in, then everything else, and let it simmer a few hours. Always better the next day!

Slim Strummer
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RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine - Wed, 05/7/08 6:01 PM
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quote:
Originally posted by ocerg

The best i ever made.

Ingredients
6 ounces hot turkey Italian sausage
2 cups chopped onion
1 cup chopped green bell pepper
8 garlic cloves, minced
1 pound ground sirloin
2 jalapeño pepper, chopped
2 tablespoons chili powder
2 tablespoons brown sugar
1 tablespoon ground cumin
3 tablespoons tomato paste
1 teaspoon dried oregano
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1/4 teaspoon salt
2 bay leaves
1 1/2 cups Merlot or other fruity red wine
2 (28-ounce) cans Muir Glen Fire roasted tomatoes, undrained and coarsely chopped
2 (15-ounce) cans Progresso kidney beans, drained
shredded sharp cheddar cheese


Preparation
Heat a large Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Remove casings from sausage. Add sausage, onion, and the next 4 ingredients (onion through jalapeño) to pan; cook 8 minutes or until sausage and beef are browned, stirring to crumble.
Add chili powder and the next 7 ingredients (chili powder through bay leaves), and cook for 1 minute, stirring constantly. Stir in wine, tomatoes, and kidney beans; bring to a boil. Cover, reduce heat, and simmer 1 hour, stirring occasionally.

Uncover and cook for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. Discard the bay leaves. Sprinkle each serving with cheddar cheese.




Made this, with the following modifications:

Subbed turkey for the beef (unless I want to eat the whole batch to my head, I have to use turkey).

Used a different brand of canned tomato (but it was still fire roasted).

It definitely tastes better the next day and actually aged quite well. The merlot is just wierd--this may not be chili--it comes out more like a bourginon stew or something--tasty, but nmot what I think of when I think of chili.

Having said that, a bottle of strong beer might be a good substitute for the merlot (which was awfully sweet).

Big Ugly Mich
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RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine - Wed, 05/7/08 8:19 PM
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This is more for when you need supper in half an hour, but it's not bad if you keep that in mind
  1. Nuke a pound of ground beef until the pink's all gone.
  2. Carefully remove the blood for the dog. If you don't have a dog, send it to me.
  3. Remove all the fat and get rid of it. One day, I'll get some lye and make soap out of it, perhaps. If the dog gets hold of it, it will make him/her EXTREMELY gassy and difficult to receive kisses of gratitude from. Never mind how I know this.
  4. Break the beef with a stick blender while nuking some chopped onions and/or peppers for 45 seconds.
  5. Mix your beef with your onions and/or peppers.
  6. Add a bag of taco seasoning or whatever spices you like, and a 14 oer 15 oz. can of diced tomatoes.
  7. Nuke the mix for one or two more minutes.
  8. Eat.
This recipe will feed me and Big Beautiful Mich, and the dog gives us much kisses of gratitude when she finishes her portion.

BarenakedChef
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RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine - Mon, 07/7/08 10:36 PM
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Here's mine, I have it posted to Recipezaar as well.

Christmas Chili Recipe #105517
From U of Alabama's "Nothing but the Best!" I made this for a football party Dustin hosted and everyone enjoyed it!
by Barenaked Chef
2½ hours | 20 min prep

SERVES 12

1 1/2 lbs ground round
2 medium white onions, diced
2 large bell peppers, diced
3 tablespoons chili powder, divided
2 tablespoons garlic powder, divided
1 teaspoon basil
3 (14 1/2 ounce) cans stewed tomatoes
3 (14 1/2 ounce) cans chili beans
1 (8 ounce) can beer
1 tablespoon black pepper
grated cheddar cheese
chopped onions
Place beef, onions and bell peppers in large Dutch oven.
Sprinkle with 1 ½ tablespoons chili powder, 1 tablespoon garlic powder, and basil.
Using a wooden spoon, blend together and brown very slowly.
You may drain if desired, but mine didn’t have a lot of grease, so I didn’t bother.
Place tomatoes in food processor and process just long enough to cup up large pieces.
Put tomatoes, beans and beer in with meat and bring to a low simmer.
Add remaining chili and garlic powder.
Add pepper.
Cook slowly for at least 2 hours.
Serve with cheese and onion.



Edited to add a picture of my chili.

Zythos
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RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine - Fri, 07/25/08 3:10 PM
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Remember me? Yes, even I can cook simply.

Crazy Ed’s White Pork Chili

1 Tbsp.
olive oil

4 cloves
chopped garlic

1 large sweet onion,
chopped

1 - 4 oz.
can chopped green chilies

1 jalapeno - diced

3/4 tsp.
ground cumin

1 tsp.
Italian herbs

2 – 16 oz. cans
Great Northern beans – undrained

32 oz. chicken stock

3 pounds pork loin, cooked and cut into large pieces

8 oz. shredded
Monterey Jack cheese

¼ tsp. salt and coarse ground black pepper to taste

Makes 4 quarts.

Instructions:

Using the olive oil and onion, cook until golden. Add the garlic and cook one more minute. Then add the chilies, cumin, Italian herbs and jalapeno sautéing 1 more minute. Transfer ingredients to a 6-quart slow cooker. Add the beans and stock. Add the prepared pork (rubbed) and grated cheese, along with your salt and pepper adjustments. Make sure to fully incorporate the cheese as it begins to melt. Cook until fully heated or until the pork reaches the texture of your choice.

PapaJoe8
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RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine - Sat, 07/26/08 11:54 AM
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Z, I like that one! Bell pepper, green chiles, and jalapenos are things I like in chili! A variation... leave out the great northerns and serve over wild rice.
Joe

Zythos
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RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine - Sat, 08/30/08 12:50 PM
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I do love this thread.

I thought I would share a previous thread I had on about.com's food thingy.

I always like a good chili discussion.

http://forums.about.com/n/pfx/forum.aspx?tsn=1&nav=messages&webtag=ab-homecooking&tid=412

E

MetroplexJim
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RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine - Fri, 10/31/08 6:53 PM
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I love chili; here are my two favorites.

The "quick way" is to get Wick Fowler's "Two Alarm Chili" spices and play with the ingredients to taste. I did this for years and still do when I'm in a hurry.

The "other way" is this 2003 "from scratch" recipe from Emeril; it is OMG good and is just as good the next day, week, or month out of the fridge or freezer. The only ingredient I don't add is the tequila simply because we only keep bourbon and wines in the house:

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/emeril-live/texas-style-chili-recipe/index.html

(After you "click" the URL, don't forget to read the reviews! Several of the reviewers even admit to winning "chili cookoffs" with this recipe).

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