Dry Age vs Wet Age

Post
CajunKing
Sirloin
2006/12/20 12:49:18
Over the years I have had the opportunity to enjoy several very good dry aged steaks.

I have tried dry aged and wet aged steaks, I was wondering what you all thougt about the 2 ways to age a steak and your pros or cons.

LMK
RE: Dry Age vs Wet Age 2006/12/20 15:17:46
Those unfamiliar with beef aging might find this article useful: http://www.extension.umn.edu/distribution/nutrition/DJ5968.html.

Since he's at Minnesota I wonder if he dry-ages his lutefisk, too...

Brad
CajunKing
Sirloin
RE: Dry Age vs Wet Age 2006/12/20 16:33:37
Brad

Good article thanks for posting it.
Now how about your preference??

For me, I like a good dry aged steak, I like the "BEEF" flavor, but the wife does not like the "strong" flavor dry aging imparts.

Then there is that whole gotta trim the mold off to get to the meat thing that totally has her turning green, yet she loves blue cheese......... WOMEN!!

BT
Filet Mignon
RE: Dry Age vs Wet Age 2006/12/20 16:52:02
"It is known that the predominant microorganisms present after dry aging are the pseudomonads whereas the lactobacilli are the most prevalent in beef aged in the bag. It is also well-known that less shrinkage occurs with beef aged in the bag as compared with dry aging."

Eeeew! That did it for me. Pseudomonads are nasty bugs. I'll take mine from the bag in future.
RE: Dry Age vs Wet Age 2006/12/20 21:38:35
quote:
Originally posted by cajunking

Brad

Good article thanks for posting it.
Now how about your preference??
I know a little bit about the aging process but have no real-word experience upon which I can base an opinion. If anything I suspect any "aged" steaks I've had in my lifetime have all been wet-aged. I wish I could offer more, but...sorry.

Brad
lleechef
Sirloin
RE: Dry Age vs Wet Age 2006/12/21 12:34:19
I prefer dry aged. When I worked in Traverse City I bought dry aged strip loins, tenderloins and prime ribs from Chicago. Best beef I ever ate (and I'm not a big beef person).......that layer of green fuzz didn't bother anyone, as it was trimmed off before cutting the steaks.

Zman said that on the farm in Iowa they dry aged their beef for their grocery store. Dry aged is spendy but it's definately worth it.
Twinwillow
Sirloin
RE: Dry Age vs Wet Age 2006/12/21 13:12:54
I've been told that when doing a large standing prime rib roast, let it sit in the fridge uncovered for about 2-3 days to sort of "dry age" it and make it more tender and "beefier" Anyone out there with experience doing this procedure?
What was the result? Do you reccomend this tip?
MilwFoodlovers
Filet Mignon
RE: Dry Age vs Wet Age 2006/12/21 20:41:29
quote:
Originally posted by twinwillow

I've been told that when doing a large standing prime rib roast, let it sit in the fridge uncovered for about 2-3 days to sort of "dry age" it and make it more tender and "beefier" Anyone out there with experience doing this procedure?
What was the result? Do you reccomend this tip?

It really tenderizes the cut but you have to have air circulation or your meat will spoil. Place on a rack with several layers of paper towels underneath. Highly recommended. If you do this too long, the outer surface will dry out. You might want to then trim off the dry area which of course will mean a smaller roast. Up to 5 days or so this will not happen.
RE: Dry Age vs Wet Age 2006/12/28 10:02:44
Just for clarification, the roast sits on the rack and the towels are underneath with clearance between them and the rack so that air can fully circulate around the meat, right? I'm getting a roast Saturday for Monday grilling and am thinking about trying this. Thanks!

Brad
lleechef
Sirloin
RE: Dry Age vs Wet Age 2006/12/28 13:29:13
quote:
Originally posted by Brad_Olson

Just for clarification, the roast sits on the rack and the towels are underneath with clearance between them and the rack so that air can fully circulate around the meat, right? I'm getting a roast Saturday for Monday grilling and am thinking about trying this. Thanks!

Brad


Right! In fact I am going to start to dry age a duck today in the fridge. This process ensures crispy skin.