Cornell Chicken

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Post
Lone Star
Double Chili Cheeseburger
2003/07/18 10:37:18
I have just read about this style of grilled chicken, and it sounds delicious!

Has anyone made this at home, or have a good recipie to share.

This Texas girl doubts she will be able to find it served in any eateries down here.
Willly
Cheeseburger
RE: Cornell Chicken 2003/07/18 11:34:30
This came straight off the first website in my Google search for "cornell chicken."

1 egg
1 cup vegetable oil
2 cups cider vinegar
3 tablespoons salt
1 tablespoon poultry seasoning
1 teaspoon ground black pepper


I have used this many times and it works great. Marinate the chicken overnight, but hold back some of the recipe to baste as you cook without contaminating the cooked chicken. Grill as high as you can over coals, turning and basting frequently.

I also do this with wings and they are delicious.

Avoid the temptation to add anything to the recipe -- its simplicity is one of its charms.
chezkatie
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Cornell Chicken 2003/07/18 11:40:05
I was born and raised in central New York State and this is the only kind of chicken barbeque that I ever knew. Cornell chicken can be found most any Saturday or Sunday as a fund raiser by volunteer fire departments and by church groups. One half a chicken is usually served with potato and macaroni salad and a soft dinner roll with pat of butter.

The recipe was developed by a professor at Cornell University and that is the reason for the name.

The recipe is as follows:

1 egg
1 cup vegetable oil
2 cups cider vinegar
3 tablespoons salt
1 tablespoon poultry seasoning
1 teaspoon ground black pepper

You beat the egg well and add the rest of ingredients and blend very well. I usually shake it in a quart jar. You then pour this over chicken halves and let marinade overnight. Grill the chicken over med heat and baste occasionally with the marinade.

This is absolutely delicious!
Cosmos
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Cornell Chicken 2003/07/18 13:54:16
See my thread "Roadside Chicken BBQ" on page 2 of the BBQ forum. Michael had posted a great photo. There's also an interesting history to it posted there. As a Central New Yorker it is definitely a fav!
Lone Star
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Cornell Chicken 2003/07/18 13:58:36
Thanks Y'all! I am going to give it a try this weekend.
garykg6
Cheeseburger
RE: Cornell Chicken 2003/07/18 16:27:26
a legendary dish!!....as the guy says,DON'T ADD ANYTHING!! serve w/ new potato salad,corn on the cob and you are in a wonderful place
Cosmos
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Cornell Chicken 2003/07/18 17:15:28
quote:
Originally posted by Lone Star

I have just read about this style of grilled chicken, and it sounds delicious!


Did you read about it here or somewhere else?
wallhd
Cheeseburger
RE: Cornell Chicken 2003/07/18 22:23:51
Seems as if I posted about this in another thread, but here goes again: The sauce was developed by Cornell Poultry Science Prof. Robert C. Baker. It was part of a larger project to improve the lot of New York poultry farmers. Prior to Dr. Baker's project, most chickens were not slaugthered until they reach a "dressed weight of 4 or 5 #. These were fryers. Any bird larger than this was a roaster.

Dr. Baker reasoned that if a market could be developed for a bird with a dressed weight of 2 3/4 to 3 #, the grower could get more turns and also open up a new market for his prodduct. Thus the "broiler" with an optimum wt of 1 1/4 to 1 1/2 # per half.

You will get the best results with your chicken 1/2 cooked on racks exactly 26" above the base of the charcoal fire. I would expect that this dimension, along with the sauce recipe was the result of much trial and error in the late 1940's and early to mid 1950's.

During my years as a Cornell undergrad, I never took a course from Dr. Baker, but I did get to know him casually.

GO BIG RED

Wally
Cornell '67
RockyB
Cheeseburger
RE: Cornell Chicken 2003/08/05 18:59:52
Like Chezkatie, I grew up in what's known as the Southern Tier of New York and the Cornell recipe was the only BBQ chicken I ever knew, nobody cooked it any different. No red sauce allowed here. I have deviated a bit from the original recipe, I cook it most any sunday, even in the winter! Here's my take on it.

3 x-large eggs <I prefer brown eggs>
1 and a half cups vegetable oil
3 cups apple-cider vinegar
1 Tbsp salt
3 Tbsp garlic powder
1 Tbsp onion powder
2 Tbsp poultry seasoning
2 Tbsp WHITE pepper
1 Tbsp Old Bay Seasoning

Whirl the daylights outta this mixture in the blender and then introduce it to your chicken parts and let them sleep together for at least a day..then cook 'em up.
Cheers!
RockyB
Cheeseburger
RE: Cornell Chicken 2003/08/05 19:02:22
Actually the best resturant-version of this recipe was just reviewed by Michael. It's a place called Phil's Chicken House in West Corners, New York <just outside Endicott>. If you can get there, you'll have a fabulous Cornell Chicken dinner, and no mess.
bobo3039
Junior Burger
RE: Cornell Chicken 2003/08/09 15:29:47
RockyB--Your variation sounds great! I love Phil's, too. (Do you happen to know how they make their coleslaw dressing?)
RockyB
Cheeseburger
RE: Cornell Chicken 2003/08/11 15:58:00
No, Bobo, I don't. It's from what I hear a closely guarded secret.
Rocky
bobo3039
Junior Burger
RE: Cornell Chicken 2003/08/11 20:20:48
Thanks, Rocky. I guess I'll have to keep going and try to figure it out.
seafarer john
Filet Mignon
RE: Cornell Chicken 2003/08/11 23:03:17
Recently saw an Emeril show in his usual bad tatste about BBQ.
A "winner" (they apparently had a contest - no one invited me) boiled a chicken for an hour in water and butter and then grilled it. Has anyone here tried anything like that?
gala62
Junior Burger
RE: Cornell Chicken 2003/09/20 07:45:35
I just posted a bit about NY Barbeque chicken under the Regional specialities thread. Forgot that its actually known as Cornell chicken, been away from home too long!

This is one of my all-time favorite ways to cook chicken, the family has to cook it any time I'm home (and its not too cold to grill!)

Salt potatoes are the best side dish....4 pounds of tiny new potatoes boiled in 1 pound of salt until tender. Melt one stick of butter over them and serve. The flesh is creamy and not too salty. Wonderful!

I am sooooooooooooo hungry!
Gail
Cosmos
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Cornell Chicken 2003/10/11 10:44:35
I picked up two birds from Bob's BBQ in Homer NY, last night. It was good timing, they are closing for the winter after this weekend....sigh.

But the Homer Fire Department had the grills cranked and smokin this morning, so there's hope for more cornell chicken this fall!
tiki
Filet Mignon
RE: Cornell Chicken 2003/10/11 18:00:03
Sounds wonderful---and salt potatos,too---got a few questions though if you experts dont mind-----1. i am assuming we are "grilling" rather then "smoking", meaning does this work as well with coals and gas? 2.i can do this outdoors with either gas or wood but with this great a distance from the heat,should i do this in a enclosure or open air,or semi enclosed? and #3 being transplanted New Englander and know alot of New Yorkers--(thats we 18 -20 yrs olds from Mass went to party back in 65-66-67)-i have a feeling this stuff was often accompineed by copius amounts of Gennie Cream Ale and wonder if i should try to find it--what do you all suggest we drink with this fine sounding bird!
Rick F.
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Cornell Chicken 2003/10/11 22:01:13
quote:
what do you all suggest we drink with this fine sounding bird!
Why, tiki, as we were in college about the same time, you should remember a song composed for just such occasions: "Cold Malt Duck."
seafarer john
Filet Mignon
RE: Cornell Chicken 2003/10/12 12:57:31
We are thankful to our upstate friends on this forum for information about "Cornell chicken". It turns out that it is just about the same as the chicken halves frequently available around the Hudson Valley at church and other organization's picnics.

We have been experimenting with it all Summer and have found that we prefer herbs like tarragon and rosemary to the basic herbs in the
real Cornell Chicken, and that the beauty of the recipe is its simplicity
and adapability. Just the marinating, in whatever blend of herbs, seems to be the secret of the success of the recipe. We also find that marinating in a brine solution with the herb mix also makes for a delicious bird.
WildWalker
Junior Burger
RE: Cornell Chicken 2004/01/23 20:52:22
I used RockyB's recipe (w/o Old Bay), and used fresh, not powdered garlic and onion, used rosemary flavored olive oil after seafarer john.

I had too much rosemary for my taste. I should have upped the garlic instead of using strongly rosemary flavored oil. But I got some raves.

I still have a batch of marinade. But I would rather have some original cornell next time.

Don


WildWalker
Junior Burger
RE: Cornell Chicken 2004/01/25 11:09:49
quote:
Originally posted by chezkatie

One half a chicken is usually served with potato and macaroni salad and a soft dinner roll with pat of butter.

The recipe was developed by a professor at Cornell University and that is the reason for the name.

The recipe is as follows:

1 egg
1 cup vegetable oil
2 cups cider vinegar
3 tablespoons salt
1 tablespoon poultry seasoning
1 teaspoon ground black pepper

You beat the egg well and add the rest of ingredients and blend very well. I usually shake it in a quart jar. You then pour this over chicken halves and let marinade overnight. Grill the chicken over med heat and baste occasionally with the marinade.

This is absolutely delicious!


With the raw egg in the marinade, how long would it keep in the refrigerator?
Barth
Junior Burger
RE: Cornell Chicken 2004/01/25 13:34:00
quote:
Originally posted by wallhd

Seems as if I posted about this in another thread, but here goes again: The sauce was developed by Cornell Poultry Science Prof. Robert C. Baker. It was part of a larger project to improve the lot of New York poultry farmers. Prior to Dr. Baker's project, most chickens were not slaugthered until they reach a "dressed weight of 4 or 5 #. These were fryers. Any bird larger than this was a roaster.

Dr. Baker reasoned that if a market could be developed for a bird with a dressed weight of 2 3/4 to 3 #, the grower could get more turns and also open up a new market for his prodduct. Thus the "broiler" with an optimum wt of 1 1/4 to 1 1/2 # per half.

You will get the best results with your chicken 1/2 cooked on racks exactly 26" above the base of the charcoal fire. I would expect that this dimension, along with the sauce recipe was the result of much trial and error in the late 1940's and early to mid 1950's.

During my years as a Cornell undergrad, I never took a course from Dr. Baker, but I did get to know him casually.

GO BIG RED

Wally
Cornell '67
WildWalker
Junior Burger
RE: Cornell Chicken 2004/01/26 18:57:43
I increased the ginger and garlic in the marinade to balance the rosemary, which I found too strong. Didn't cut up the chicken breast as before, but left it whole...skinless, boneless. Marinated for only 2 hours, cooked in fry pan in more reserved marinade. Delicious. I am astounded.

Don

WildWalker
Junior Burger
RE: Cornell Chicken 2004/02/05 12:12:50
quote:
Originally posted by WildWalker

quote:
Originally posted by chezkatie


The recipe is as follows:
1 egg
1 cup vegetable oil
2 cups cider vinegar
3 tablespoons salt
1 tablespoon poultry seasoning
1 teaspoon ground black pepper

With the raw egg in the marinade, how long would it keep in the refrigerator?


I read in the Food Code (FDA, 2001) that foods with pH below 4.6 are off the "potentially dangerous list". I'd guess the vinager's pH is below 2.0, but I don't have a pH meter handy now, so does anyone have a table of the pH of common foods including vinager?

Wild Walker
mad scientist at work in the kitchen
Cakes
Double Cheeseburger
RE: Cornell Chicken 2004/02/05 12:21:40
quote:
Originally posted by WildWalker

quote:
Originally posted by WildWalker

quote:
Originally posted by chezkatie


The recipe is as follows:
1 egg
1 cup vegetable oil
2 cups cider vinegar
3 tablespoons salt
1 tablespoon poultry seasoning
1 teaspoon ground black pepper

With the raw egg in the marinade, how long would it keep in the refrigerator?


I read in the Food Code (FDA, 2001) that foods with pH below 4.6 are off the "potentially dangerous list". I'd guess the vinager's pH is below 2.0, but I don't have a pH meter handy now, so does anyone have a table of the pH of common foods including vinager?

Wild Walker
mad scientist at work in the kitchen


Titration Junction!

Given a very accurate table it would still require a degree in chemistry to calculate the resulting pH of a recipe. If you really want to know you will need a pH meter.

Cakes
chezkatie
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Cornell Chicken 2004/02/05 12:22:10
quote:
Originally posted by WildWalker

quote:
Originally posted by chezkatie

One half a chicken is usually served with potato and macaroni salad and a soft dinner roll with pat of butter.

The recipe was developed by a professor at Cornell University and that is the reason for the name.

The recipe is as follows:

1 egg
1 cup vegetable oil
2 cups cider vinegar
3 tablespoons salt
1 tablespoon poultry seasoning
1 teaspoon ground black pepper

You beat the egg well and add the rest of ingredients and blend very well. I usually shake it in a quart jar. You then pour this over chicken halves and let marinade overnight. Grill the chicken over med heat and baste occasionally with the marinade.

This is absolutely delicious!


With the raw egg in the marinade, how long would it keep in the refrigerator?


Akways thow any leftover marinade away! We never save it.
WildWalker
Junior Burger
RE: Cornell Chicken 2004/02/05 12:46:10
quote:

The recipe is as follows:
1 cup vegetable oil
2 cups cider vinegar
1 tablespoon poultry seasoning
1 teaspoon pepper mix

Without the raw egg in the marinade, how long would the reserved marinade that had not touched the raw chicken, keep in the refrigerator?
I read in the Food Code (FDA, 2001) that foods with pH below 4.6 are off the "potentially dangerous list". I'd guess the vinager's pH is below 2.0, but I don't have a pH meter handy now, so does anyone have a table of the pH of common foods including vinager?

Wild Walker
mad scientist, with enough science degrees, at work in the kitchen
quote:

Titration Junction!
Given a very accurate table it would still require a degree in chemistry to calculate the resulting pH of a recipe.

I have the degrees, where is the table?
quote:

If you really want to know you will need a pH meter.
Cakes

You are saying food establishments need a pH meter to implement the Food Code of the FDA? I think it's easier than that.
Using my modified recipe, the pH of the marinade is very close to that of vinager of 5% acid.

WildWalker
Mad scientist at work in the kitchen.
Cosmos
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Cornell Chicken 2004/03/18 13:50:26
I hit my first chicken BBQ of the season a couple of weekends ago. The Cortlandville Fire Department was out in the snow raising funds. Good chicken was had by all... Can't wait for the weather to warm up a bit, and see more some white smoke rise to the sky.
chezkatie
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Cornell Chicken 2004/03/18 15:19:41
quote:
Originally posted by Cosmos

I hit my first chicken BBQ of the season a couple of weekends ago. The Cortlandville Fire Department was out in the snow raising funds. Good chicken was had by all... Can't wait for the weather to warm up a bit, and see more some white smoke rise to the sky.


I sure envy you............miss those central NY chicken BBQ's so much. Somehow, it just doesn't taste as good done on our grill in Maryland.
Cosmos
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Cornell Chicken 2004/03/18 18:00:01
I intend to attempt to recreate the recipies published above on my weber this summer...we'll see if its as good. Otherwise, I'll have to build one of the concrete block monstrosities. Think my nieghbors would mind if I put one by the curb?
chezkatie
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Cornell Chicken 2004/03/18 19:14:25
quote:
Originally posted by Cosmos

I intend to attempt to recreate the recipies published above on my weber this summer...we'll see if its as good. Otherwise, I'll have to build one of the concrete block monstrosities. Think my nieghbors would mind if I put one by the curb?


Hey, the fragrance of that BBQ would enhance any neighborhood. Go for it!
stanpnepa
Double Cheeseburger
RE: Cornell Chicken 2004/03/18 22:01:07
Mom always made really bland chicken, serving it plain from out of the pot. We had it at least once a week. I buried it with salt, pepper and whatever else I could round up.

I never order chicken out in PA, unless it's fried or a southern barbecue...and even then, it's not golden up here. So, I was skeptical a few weeks back entering Phil's.

Though not fried, or covered in sauce...the bird couldn't be any different than Mom's---and in this instance, that's a good thing!

The marinade soaked in for a nice favorful meat, and the skin had a spicy kick. Good stuff. Excellent chicken noodle soup too I may add.

So, I may even try to whoop some up for myself sometime soon. (And obviously because of my predispostion, I've never cooked chicken).

Cornell Chicken---Northern Chicken that doesn't stink!!!
Cosmos
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Cornell Chicken 2004/04/07 11:45:40
quote:
Originally posted by Cosmos

I intend to attempt to recreate the recipies published above on my weber this summer...we'll see if its as good. Otherwise, I'll have to build one of the concrete block monstrosities. Think my nieghbors would mind if I put one by the curb?


Ok folks, I did it. Fortunately, my free range chicken supplier gave us a couple batches of small chickens (there was a fox nearby and the little things were too stressed to eat) so I had the perfect size for cooking.

I marinated them most of the day, (would have liked to have done it overnight) and cooked them indirectly on my weber, basting every ten minutes or so, for about an hour.

They came out great, a bit salty (next time I'll halve the salt). We wolfed them down with the first potato salad of the year....yum!

Its nice to be able to control the cooking. My one complaint with the firemen / church chicken, is it is often dry.

So give it a shot, its practicaly fool proof.
dbear
Cheeseburger
RE: Cornell Chicken 2004/04/07 15:36:04
My wife's family is from Rochester, NY, which seems to be close enough to Ithaca to have the Cornell Recipe as a de facto standard. Growing up in Boston, I remember not liking chicken that much since it always seemed to come out dry. I don't think this is possible using the Cornell method. This recipe and method was not referred to as Cornell or anything else by name, it was simply how chicken was cooked. Adding a little Cholula to the marinade gives a slightly different flavor. Warm enough to BBQ here, I'm going to cook this tonight!
r0dkn0cker
Junior Burger
RE: Cornell Chicken 2004/06/13 18:57:58
What? Where did you all get that story????
chezkatie
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Cornell Chicken 2004/06/13 19:14:04
quote:
Originally posted by r0dkn0cker

What? Where did you all get that story????


What story are you referring to?
r0dkn0cker
Junior Burger
RE: Cornell Chicken 2004/06/13 19:25:20
Cornell chicken was invented for a specific reason by one man, Bob Baker, who as the person earlier stated is a retired Professor at Cornell University. The sauce was invented for a specific goal which had nothing to do with BBQ. The occasion was a dinner held in 1946 for Pennsylvania governor Edward Martin. At that time Dr. Baker was a young professor at the University of Pennsylvania. He was asked to come up with something unusual to serve at the function. Baker's goal was to get people to eat more chicken. See, back in the 1930's and 40's chicken were raised primarily for their eggs, not for eating. Apparently everyone loved his chicken recipe and when Dr. Baker joined Cornell University in 1949 he brought his chicken recipe with him. Two years later his recipe appeared in a university publication and became known as Cornell chicken...and that my friends, is where Cornell chicken sauce originated from...

Original Cornell Chicken Sauce

1 Large Egg (Not for flavor, to hold ingredients together)
1 C. Vegetable Oil
2 C. Cider Vinegar
3 Tbs. Coarse Salt (Kosher or Sea)
1 Tbs. Poultry Seasoning
1/2 Tsp. Freshly Ground Black Pepper

My personal opinion is not to marinade your chicken for more than one hour as it will take on a strong vinegar taste. Let the other ingredients flavor the chicken by dipping the chicken every time you turn it on the grill.

We have found other variations of Dr. Baker's Cornell sauce that are also delicious...

Cornell Chicken with Mustard Baste

1 Large Egg
1/2 C. Extra Virgin Olive Oil
1/2 C. Mustard Oil, or more Olive Oil
1/4 C. Dijon Mustard
2 C. Distilled White Vinegar
3 Tbs. Coarse Salt (Kosher or Sea)
1 Tbs. Mustard Seeds
2 Cloves Garlic, Minced
1/2 Tsp. Freshly Ground Black Pepper


Cornell Chicken with Curry Orange Baste

1 Large Egg
1 C. Vegetable Oil
1 C. Fresh Lime Juice or Distilled White Vinegar
1 C. Fresh Orange Juice
3 Tbs. Coarse Salt (Kosher or Sea)
2 Tbs. Curry Powder
2 Cloves Garlic, Minced
1/2 Tsp. Freshly Ground Black Pepper

If you would like to sample Dr. Baker's chicken, such as President's have, visit Baker's Chicken Coop at the New York State Fair in Syracuse, NY. If you are unable to visit the great New York State Fair, you can also find him at the Tea Room at Baker's Acres just outside of Ithaca, NY.


joanie41
Cheeseburger
RE: Cornell Chicken 2004/06/13 19:47:10
This may be sacrilege, but has anyone ever tried baking or broiling the chicken? Our grill is out of commission presently, so I thought it might be fun to try the recipe indoors. Also...does anyone precook the chicken a little before grilling to lower the amount of time it takes?!

Yes, I know these are shortcuts. But life around here is pretty hectic!!
r0dkn0cker
Junior Burger
RE: Cornell Chicken 2004/06/13 19:58:34
Yes we have tried cooking this in the oven... however it is not as crispy. The flavor is there but it's not the same as cooking it on the grill, it becomes very vinegarry (if that's a word...ha ha). However, for someone who has grill out of commission, you can try another chicken recipe, although it's not a Cornell recipe. The crock pot recipe is the best. Simple and DELICIOUS Take a whole chicken 4-7 pounds, depending on the size of your crock pot or how many you have to feed, sprinkle the chicken with seasoning salt until well coated, and then just throw it in the crock pot on low for 6-8 hours. DO NOT ADD WATER OR ANY JUICES! This makes so much juice for gravy it's incredible. Throw down some french fries or make some mashed potatos and the gravy is fantastic. My husband also recommends using some of the broth to cook his rice in instead of using water.
joanie41
Cheeseburger
RE: Cornell Chicken 2004/06/13 20:08:41
Yes, I have done whole chickens in the crock pot, and they are wonderful. And yes, there is a ton of juice to play with afterward! I'm so intrigued by this Cornell recipe that I may have to get out our grill and see if it's workable (hubby thinks it's on its last legs...) just to try it out.

My mouth just waters when I surf the Roadfood site...!
r0dkn0cker
Junior Burger
RE: Cornell Chicken 2004/06/13 20:16:06
Go to Wal-Mart, spend the $30 and buy a small Smokey Joe Grill...I would...it's better than the oven and worth the money.
Cosmos
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Cornell Chicken 2004/06/14 20:22:03
quote:
Originally posted by r0dkn0cker

Go to Wal-Mart, spend the $30 and buy a small Smokey Joe Grill...I would...it's better than the oven and worth the money.


A Joe would work, but the original process was to cook them slowly... let the juices mingle . I used my ancient 22" Weber with indirect cooking for mine, but by all means try it, the taste of marinade and smell of the smoke alone is well worth it. You can always experiment with how you like it cooked.
chezkatie
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Cornell Chicken 2004/06/14 20:33:42
quote:
Originally posted by Cosmos

quote:
Originally posted by r0dkn0cker

Go to Wal-Mart, spend the $30 and buy a small Smokey Joe Grill...I would...it's better than the oven and worth the money.


A Joe would work, but the original process was to cook them slowly... let the juices mingle . I used my ancient 22" Weber with indirect cooking for mine, but by all means try it, the taste of marinade and smell of the smoke alone is well worth it. You can always experiment with how you like it cooked.



We had the Cornell chicken on Saturday evening and I swear that it smelled so wonderful while grilling that the cicada's stopped their "love call"!
r0dkn0cker
Junior Burger
RE: Cornell Chicken 2004/06/14 22:39:33
Bakers recipe is unusual in the annals of American barbecue. First of all, it contains not a speck of tomato or any sweet red barbecue sauce. And the bird grills -directly- over the fire; its not smoked in a pit. the ingredients Baker uses for basting-cider vinegar, vegetable oil, poultry seasoning, an egg, a hefty dose of salt, and some black peper- make a combination that would raise the eyebrows of most pit masters. "the vinegar, salt, and poultry seasoning act to boost flavor," explains Baker. "the oil keeps the bird from burning."
santacruz
Cheeseburger
RE: Cornell Chicken 2004/06/25 16:11:19
Is Cornell chicken anything like Oneonta chicken at Brooks? Brooks has a very delicious chicken recipe last time I was on the East Coast
I thougt is one of the best I have ever tasted. Also does the Cornell recipe taste much different from the Vestal chicken spiedies?
Cosmos
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Cornell Chicken 2004/06/25 17:21:15
There is a post somewhere from someone who contends Brooks does not use the cornell recipe. I've only had theirs once and its very similar. The marinade has that vinegar kick but is not as "herby" as a speidie marinade
RubyRose
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Cornell Chicken 2004/06/26 10:02:57
There is a long tradition of chicken BBQ dinners as fundraisers for churches, fire companies, V.F.W.'s, Lions' Clubs, etc. in east central PA but I have never seen it served in amy restaurants in the same area. Chicken halves are not marinated but slowly grilled on metal racks about 3 1/2 feet from the coals. Since vinegar is one of the major food groups in PA Dutch cooking, the chicken is brushed often with a wash (have never heard it called a sauce) that's usually:

3 or 4 parts cider vinegar
1 part worcestershire sauce
Salt, pepper and lots of paprika
No oil, herbs, etc.

Typical side dishes are a baked potato, pepper cabbage and/or applesauce and a dinner roll and butter pats. Some offer a small container of bottled tomato-based BBQ sauce for dipping but only upon request. Once in a while in mid-summer when it's too hot to have the oven going for the baked potatoes, side dishes would be an ear of cooked corn, sliced tomatoes and pepper cabbage.

Just thought I would offer a local variation that most visitors would not get to taste.
seafarer john
Filet Mignon
RE: Cornell Chicken 2004/06/26 16:37:36
OK.what's pepper cabbage?
RubyRose
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Cornell Chicken 2004/06/26 19:47:45
quote:
Originally posted by seafarer john

OK.what's pepper cabbage?


It's a type of mayonnaiseless coleslaw (is that like a victimless crime?) with cabbage, a little bit of green pepper and onion ground or chopped up small instead of sliced. The dressing is cider vinegar, sugar and celery seeds, plus salt and pepper. Some places add some salad oil like Crisco oil but that's not the norm. Sometimes the dressing is boiled and poured hot onto the cabbage and then chilled.
Pwingsx
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Cornell Chicken 2004/06/27 00:51:12
My sister's MIL makes this kind of coleslaw. It's incredible! I've always been a big fan of the more mayo, the better, in a coleslaw, but this stands in a league all it's own.
seafarer john
Filet Mignon
RE: Cornell Chicken 2004/06/27 13:30:27
Thanks, Rubyrose, that looks interesting- think we'll try it sometime soon. My guess is that it is a dish with wide variations in taste due to the quantities of each ingredient being left up to each individual cook - I think I'll try mine on the sweet side...
wallhd
Cheeseburger
RE: Cornell Chicken 2004/06/27 15:16:49
For some reason, the chicken always seems to taste soooo much better when cooked in larger scale quantities.

Last Sunday my wife brought home "leftover" Cornell chicken from a BBQ held the previous day at her church.

I reheated it on the gas grill, it still was pretty good, but most of it was sort of undercooked originally. Too bad. Guess I'll have to offer them my expertise next year!

Wally
Cornell '67
Cosmos
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Cornell Chicken 2005/01/29 10:16:30
I stopped for coffee this morning at Linani's, Main St, Homer, NY, and was greeted by the smell of cornell chicken getting started on a big grill accross the street. Some club was cranking up the grills for a fund raiser.

What a great thing to experience on a sub-zero morning! I'll have to call my wife and have her pick some up for dinner, as I'm stuck in my office in Syracuse, and it'll be all gone by the time I get home.....maybe we'll make potato salad.
santacruz
Cheeseburger
RE: Cornell Chicken 2005/01/31 15:04:52
Hey Cosmo, Pretty soon it will also be Spiedie season, there is heat at the end of that cold Western NY winter tunnel.

My younger brother has to drive from Vestal to Syracuse everyweek to give roadtests for NYDMV. The poor guy went over to the vegan side no more Great Cornell,Brooks or Lupo's. I don't know how he keeps his strengh and spirits up.

Spring is in the air.
Cosmos
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Cornell Chicken 2005/01/31 17:15:12
Speidies I can do on my Smokey Joe on the front porch, but I'm not diggin' my 27" kettle out of the snow drift to do cornell chicken!

By the way, I got busy, and forgot to call my wife to pick-up the chicken, and by the time I got to Homer they were all gone...nothing but ash in the snow! Damn!
chezkatie
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Cornell Chicken 2005/01/31 17:20:42
quote:
Originally posted by Cosmos

Speidies I can do on my Smokey Joe on the front porch, but I'm not diggin' my 27" kettle out of the snow drift to do cornell chicken!

By the way, I got busy, and forgot to call my wife to pick-up the chicken, and by the time I got to Homer they were all gone...nothing but ash in the snow! Damn!


I cannot believe you..........the smell of that cooking would not have left my mind until I had made that call
Cosmos
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Cornell Chicken 2005/03/07 10:01:40
There, I did it this weekend! The Homer Elks were set-up on the same corner, and I picked up three halves for $10.50 (the aroma driving me crazy until I got home). I made some potato salad with a touch of cajun mustard, a nice green salad with a tarragon vinegrette, and we had a nice summer dinner on a 29 degree day.

I bought some Hoffmanns german franks to help finish-off the potato salad on Sunday.

I'm ready for summer now! Unfortunately, we are looking at another couple weeks of cold and snow...oh well it is Central New York!
rwschemquest
Hamburger
RE: Cornell Chicken 2005/03/30 17:28:00
Found another restaurant (besides Brooks House of BBQ in Oneonta, NY that serves up a great Cornell Chicken -- Giffy's on Rt 9 in Clifton Park, NY. Great please and the chicken is almost as good as Brooks.
Cosmos
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Cornell Chicken 2005/03/31 08:11:32
My brother-in-law lives in Clifton Park. I'll ask him to test it out.
shanlee
Junior Burger
RE: Cornell Chicken 2005/06/29 14:19:29
My family had their own version of how this recipe came about...My great Uncle Jim Green held BBQ's at the Oakland Hotel in Glen Aubrey NY in the late 50's. The story goes that Heinz wanted to buy the recipe...he wouldn't sell and so...a professor at cornell broke the recipe down by chemical analysis and that is the Cornell Recipe...Jin Green's is not sold anymore but can be found as a dry ingredients packaged fund raiser for the Race for a cure...manufactured by his son. Thats what I was always told. Anyhow I know for a fact these recipes are leaving out a "secret" ingredient. HEH HEH HEH

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