Catfish Capital

Post
Sundancer7
Fire Safety Admin
2007/06/27 12:21:02
I drove through Belzona, MS a couple of days ago and I noticed thousands of huge pools of blue water. I stopped in the city and they had a catfish museum.

I learned a few things that I was not aware of. They teach the fish to eat off the top of the water with pellets that float to keep the fish from bottom feeding. They do not add antibiotics to the fish. The water is constantly freshed with well water. The county is the largest producer of catfish in the USA. They have thousands and thousands of acres of aquaculture.

I did not know that catfish farming was this huge.

http://www.catfishinstitute.com/

Paul E. Smith
Knoxville, TN
CajunKing
Sirloin
RE: Catfish Capital 2007/06/28 16:05:26
Paul

Yes it is a huge industry, I have a friend who raised catfish, and never knew that is why they fed them that way, it makes sense. it was always fun to watch a perfectly flat pond get totally trashed, when the feeding frenzy occured.

Ms does raise some mighty fine catfish, and GOOOOOOOOD tasting ones too.
Extreme Glow
Double Cheeseburger
RE: Catfish Capital 2007/06/28 17:03:59
It's Belzoni.

If you want to see how extensive it is, just check out the area on Google Earth and see all the catfish ponds.
Sundancer7
Fire Safety Admin
RE: Catfish Capital 2007/06/28 17:45:48
quote:
Originally posted by Extreme Glow

It's Belzoni.

If you want to see how extensive it is, just check out the area on Google Earth and see all the catfish ponds.


You are correct and I am sorry about the misspell.

Paul E. Smith
Knoxville, TN
Adjudicator
Sirloin
RE: Catfish Capital 2007/06/28 19:05:04
You might notice that the CFI has a lot of tasty recipes and other such stuff on their website, also.
Sundancer7
Fire Safety Admin
RE: Catfish Capital 2007/06/30 16:15:21
It was incredible driving down the four lane highway out of Greenville and seeing the thousands of acres of pools of blue water that was 6-8 feet deep with the millions of catfish that they train to eat on top of the water instead of being bottom feeders. That improves the flavor of the fish and makes the flesh soft and sweet.

Paul E. Smith
Knoxville, Tn
sellsfish
Junior Burger
RE: Catfish Capital 2007/07/04 03:06:37
Did you know that most of those farms are USDA certified. The quality on farm raised / grain fed catfish is head and shoulders above trotline caught cats.
Adjudicator
Sirloin
RE: Catfish Capital 2007/07/06 20:00:41
quote:
Originally posted by sellsfish

Did you know that most of those farms are USDA certified. The quality on farm raised / grain fed catfish is head and shoulders above trotline caught cats.


Although I don't hold an ounce of competence with the USDA, I know what you mean. The catfish caught in my area; from the Flint River and especially Lake Seminole all taste like ammonia. I quit eating them years ago.
mbrookes
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Catfish Capital 2007/07/17 13:11:28
Be on the alert for Vietnamese basa that is sold as catfish. NOT GOOD! That has really hurt the catfish industry here. Many of us always ask if the catfish is Mississippi pond raised, and if not we skip it.
Catfish farmers (I know a few) are hard working people striving to praduce a superion product. They deserve a lot of credit.
Sundancer7
Fire Safety Admin
RE: Catfish Capital 2007/07/17 13:32:49
I believe the catfish farmers in Mississippi pride themselves on the fresh water and teaching the catfish to forage on top of the water due to they type of food that floats and keeps them off the bottom.

Their claim is that the flesh is white, sweet and has no bottom taste. They also use no antibiotics.

I bought a very good catfish dinner while in the area and my experience as that it was sweet, tasty and very light.

It is a huge industry in Mississippi.

Paul E. Smith
Knoxville, TN
Robearjr
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Catfish Capital 2007/07/17 18:21:03
Catfish may be one of the few fish that is better farmed than wild. No one would prefer a farmed salmon, shrimp, or rock fish (stripers), and no one would ask his fishmonger for a wild catfish.

I've read that farmed carp is also starting to gain traction, not so much in America but in the rest of the world. In blind taste testing, people could not distinguish it from tuna.