Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location

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Bushie
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/12 10:22:27 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by Lone Star


Bushie - you did not mention Pecos cantelopes, our beautiful, sweet fruits from the arid Pecos Valley. There is something about the soil there that makes them the best in the world.


You're right. I also forgot to mention Texas Ruby Red Grapefruit!
#31
Bushie
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/12 10:36:10 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by Michael Stern
[br
I never knew Italian beef was unique to Chicago ... until I moved away and couldn't find it anywhere.


We are extremely fortunate that a guy from Chicago opened up a place here called Lucky Dog. There are 3 or 4 locations now (one in Round Rock - Yes!), that serve Italian Beefs, Chicago Dogs, cheese fries, sausage sandwiches, etc. He "imports" all the right ingredients from Chicago, and it's wonderful to be able to get a version of everything here.

However, the Beefs just don't taste quite as good as Al's or Mr. Beef. Must be something in the water...
#32
Lucky Bishop
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/12 15:59:37 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by Bushie
You're right. I also forgot to mention Texas Ruby Red Grapefruit!


I also haven't seen any mention of Kings Ranch Casserole, without which no Texas potluck would be complete.
#33
KimChee43
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/12 16:12:51 (permalink)
LUCKY BISHOP: Enlighten us, please! What is Kings Ranch Casserole? Would you share the recipe? You got me curious. Thanks!
#34
Lone Star
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/12 16:27:33 (permalink)
Here it is Kim. I don't know if Rotel is a staple in pantries around the country, but no Texas home is without it!

KING RANCH CHICKEN



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Ingredients:
1/4 cup margarine
1 medium green bell pepper, chopped
1 medium onion, chopped
1 can (10 3/4 oz.) condensed cream of mushroom soup
1 can (10 3/4 oz.) condensed cream of chicken soup
1 can (10 oz.) RO*TEL Diced Tomatoes & Green Chilies
2 cups cubed cooked chicken
12 corn tortillas, torn into bite-sized pieces
2 cups (8 oz.) shredded cheddar cheese
Directions:
Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. In a large saucepan, cook pepper and
onion in melted margarine until tender, about 5 minutes. Add soups,
RO*TEL and chicken, stirring until well blended. In a 13 x 9 x 2-inch
baking pan, alternately layer tortillas, soup mixture and cheese, repeating
for three layers. Bake 40 minutes or until hot and bubbling. Serves 8.


p.s. Sometimes I will use ground beef instead of chicken. This casserole freezes very well.
#35
KimChee43
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/12 17:08:52 (permalink)
LUCKY BISHOP: Many thanks for the recipe! Ro-Tel tomatoes are easy to find in my area. I'll definitely give it a try!
#36
KimChee43
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/12 17:13:07 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by KimChee43

LUCKY BISHOP: Many thanks for the recipe! Ro-Tel tomatoes are easy to find in my area. I'll definitely give it a try!


LONE STAR: Guess I have to see about getting a new eyeglass prescription! Thank YOU for the recipe! Best wishes.
#37
ocdreamr
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/12 21:35:42 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by Bushie

A somewhat "unique" item for central Texas may be Migas (eggs scrambled with tortilla chips, hot peppers, onions, tomatoes, topped with cheese). I have heard the claim that they were "invented" at an Austin restaurant, but I don't know if that's true. Generally a breakfast item, many restaurants serve them any time of day.


Bushie, my sister loves Migas, she gets them on the Island & in Port Isabel. Also she used to send my sister here in Baltimore & I a case of those Ruby Reds every year, but because of our blood pressure meds we have to limit our intake of grapefruit now, I really miss the Ruby Reds, They are so sweet you could eat them out of hand like an orange.
#38
fummunda
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/12 22:51:10 (permalink)
Kansas City here...BBQ in all its local variations: burnt ends, brisket, ribs, sausage, basically anything that once moved. Slow-smoked, with sauce (of a gazillion different varieties) slathered on the meat only upon serving. Gee whiz I guess I know what I'm having for lunch tomorrow!
#39
goldsborscht
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/12 22:52:16 (permalink)
Just came back from Montreal. As Sundance discussed, fries with gravy and cheese curd is huge there. Nasty on first bite, but starts to grow on you. I seeked it out everywhere. They even have poutine at McDonald's. Best was La Fleur. Also bbq chicken in Montreal is rotisserie chicken with slightly sweet brown gravy. Best is St. Hubert's. They also have bagels that I found better than NY's. The bagels taste more like pretzels, topped with sesame. Best was St. Viateurs. Also smoked meat, a form of pastrami, which again I found as good as Katz's. The legendary place for smoked meat is Schwartz's. Montreal is a real gold mine of Roadfood. Every little place has a lot of pride in their preparation, even fast food. It's amazing that this city exists.
#40
ocdreamr
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/12 23:03:46 (permalink)
Just thought of another Baltimore thing. Used to be easier to find than it is today. Coddie Cakes - fish cakes made from dried cod with mashed potato, must be served on saltines with mustard. These can still be found in local delis & bars. One local church makes them every friday & sells them by the tray full.
#41
Bushie
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/13 00:15:59 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by ocdreamr

...I really miss the Ruby Reds, They are so sweet you could eat them out of hand like an orange.
Hey OC, you're right about those Ruby Reds; they call them "orange-sweet" because they really are! (I wonder why grapefruit increases the potency of the BP medicine I've read about that before.)

Those "Coddie Cakes" you talked about sound very yummy!
#42
Dipstick
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/15 11:38:54 (permalink)
In Minnesota, the "Hotdish" is king. Several examples are:
-Tater Tot
-Hamburger & Noodle
-Pizza
-Seven Bean
-Chicken & Rice(sometimes called Chicken Continental)
-Kielbassa & Kraut
-Apple & Onion

Of course the one thing that is most well known in these parts is Lutefisk. In my opinion, avoid at all costs.
#43
lleechef
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/15 12:13:39 (permalink)
Growing up in western PA my mother used to make something called City Chicken. I believe it was a mixture of pork and veal, cubed, on a small wooden skewer which she floured then browned then braised with mushrooms. Anyone ever heard of this?
#44
peppertree
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/15 12:55:19 (permalink)
Philadelphia- Cheesesteak
NYC-Pizza
Texas-Chicken Fried Steak
Louisiana-Po Boy
Miami-Cuban sandwich
#45
jpatweb
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/15 17:05:27 (permalink)
In my native Connecticut, New Haven style pizza is perhaps the food most identified with the state. White clam pies, in particular, are a specialty. Along the coastline from West Haven to the Rhode Island border, lobster rolls drenched in butter (not the lobster salad type) are prevalent and sinful. Statewide, there is a very strong hot dog culture. Split buns, which add to the hot dog experience, are a Connecticut specialty that hasn't crossed over to too many, if any, other places. Also, steamed cheeseburgers, though found in only a small pocket of the state, are a true Connecticut treasure.

In my adopted area of Washington, DC, half smokes seem to be the only regional food of note. Dirty water types sold from carts on the street are repulsive and should be avoided at all costs. Finer versions can be had from Ben's Chili Bowl in the District and the much-less heralded Weenie Beanie in Arlington, Virginia.
#46
wanderingjew
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/15 17:08:41 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by jpatweb

In my native Connecticut, New Haven style pizza is perhaps the food most identified with the state. White clam pies, in particular, are a specialty. Along the coastline from West Haven to the Rhode Island border, lobster rolls drenched in butter (not the lobster salad type) are prevalent and sinful. Statewide, there is a very strong hot dog culture. Split buns, which add to the hot dog experience, are a Connecticut specialty that hasn't crossed over to too many, if any, other places. Also, steamed cheeseburgers, though found in only a small pocket of the state, are a true Connecticut treasure.

In my adopted area of Washington, DC, half smokes seem to be the only regional food of note. Dirty water types sold from carts on the street are repulsive and should be avoided at all costs. Finer versions can be had from Ben's Chili Bowl in the District and the much-less heralded Weenie Beanie in Arlington, Virginia.


How about chicken pies in Central Connecticut and Bean Pies in DC? I remember a few years ago being in DC and seeing alot of "Bean Pie" vendors.
#47
Lucky Bishop
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/15 17:25:09 (permalink)
Speaking of beans, the style of beans that I'm making for dinner tonight are part of my native Texan culture that I've never seen anywhere else: pintos cooked with tomato sauce, chorizo and chili powder until the beans are done, the chorizo has dissolved into mush and the sauce is thick and cordovan. Served with cornbread (or, if you're like me, the cornbread is crumbled into the bowl and the beans are ladled on top!) and whole scallions, with the leftover beans (always make twice as much as you're going to eat) getting turned into a pot of chili the next day, the leftovers of THAT either turned into a Frito pie or served over a pan of enchiladas, depending on how much is left.

Oh dear lord, I'm starving...
#48
seafarer john
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/15 18:16:46 (permalink)
I've wracked my brain and I can't think of a single unique food item we have here in the Hudson Valley - maybe it's just because the area is so cosmopolitan and has never been isolated from the rest of the food world. I'm sure the food historians and recreators will come up with some obscure old old Dutch dish that most of us have never heard of- but we're talking real people's food here on this site....
#49
jpatweb
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/15 19:05:27 (permalink)
Wandering - Anytime I've seen those miniature bean pies being sold on DC street corners, they are being sold by members of the Nation of Islam. I'm not sure if they are unique to DC or if they can be found wherever Farakhan has a presence. Anyhow, for many reasons that I won't go into here, I haven't tried one.

Chicken pies in Central, as well as Northeastern, CT. Good call.

quote:
Originally posted by wanderingjew

quote:
Originally posted by jpatweb

In my native Connecticut, New Haven style pizza is perhaps the food most identified with the state. White clam pies, in particular, are a specialty. Along the coastline from West Haven to the Rhode Island border, lobster rolls drenched in butter (not the lobster salad type) are prevalent and sinful. Statewide, there is a very strong hot dog culture. Split buns, which add to the hot dog experience, are a Connecticut specialty that hasn't crossed over to too many, if any, other places. Also, steamed cheeseburgers, though found in only a small pocket of the state, are a true Connecticut treasure.

In my adopted area of Washington, DC, half smokes seem to be the only regional food of note. Dirty water types sold from carts on the street are repulsive and should be avoided at all costs. Finer versions can be had from Ben's Chili Bowl in the District and the much-less heralded Weenie Beanie in Arlington, Virginia.


How about chicken pies in Central Connecticut and Bean Pies in DC? I remember a few years ago being in DC and seeing alot of "Bean Pie" vendors.
#50
ocdreamr
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/15 22:07:53 (permalink)
Ditto on the bean pies here in Baltimore, the nation of Islam guys in their Armani suits sell them on the street corners, never had one either.

Lucky Bishop, sounds like Ranchero beans to me, only I like smoked sausage & ham in there too! I Learned to love the ones at La Fogata in Nuevo Progresso so I have tried to duplicate them at home, not bad if I have to say so myself! Have some in the freezer now, Hmm, might make a good storm meal!
#51
PCC
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/16 00:40:11 (permalink)
quote from Lucky Bishop:

"I lived in Russell, Kansas, for nine months (that seemed like nine years) in the early '80s. My junior high cafeteria served a local specialty called a bierock, which was what I'd known growing up in Colorado as a cabbageburger: shredded cabbage, ground beef, onions and salt cooked together and then encased in a dough that's similar to the kind of only lightly-sweetened kolache dough that you most often find in my ancestral homeland of central Texas wrapped arround smoked sausages."

That cabbageburger/bierock is known as a runza in Nebraska. There is even a Runza chain restaurant here.
#52
wanderingjew
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/16 10:00:12 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by ocdreamr


As to Maryland - steamed crabs, yes, but also Maryland crab soup, made from scratch with crab bodies & claws, not just crab meat dumped into vegetable soup. Maryland fried chicken, Bergers cookies - an excuse for eating lots of chocolate icing(available in most groceries & convenience stores in the Baltimore area)http://www.bergercookies.com/index.htm. Pit Beef sandwiches - pit grilled beef served on a kaiser roll with horseradish & BBQ sauce - found in multiple stands around Baltimore but most notibly out Pulaski Highway


Can't forget Cheseapeake Fries also known as old bay fries or vinegar fries.
#53
KokomoJoe
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/16 13:37:36 (permalink)
"Creamed Finandhaddie" comes to mind for me! From the Boston and New England area! This is smoked haddock (NOT smoked Cod!) that is put into a cream sauce and served over mashed potatoes and served piping hot w/ a big appetite! One of my "All Time Favorites"!
Codfish cakes also come to mind for a "regional food" in New England. (It's not a favorite of mine but we used to have them on Friday night along w/ baked beans (Boston...of course!!!)!
That (Boston Baked Beans) brings me to the next regional food thought..."Boston Brown Bread" which was served along w/ Baked Beans! This "Brown Bread" we find here in New England in a can (yes...a can...) in the super market, near the baked beans. B&M the company that makes the Baked Beans...also makes "Brown Bread"!Brown bread usually has raisins in it and you remove it whole from the can (by removing both ends). We used to "steam" it when I was a kid. Now you can "nuke" it! Serve it warm w/ butter w/ the baked beans! Yum! It's sort of like the sweet "quick breads" ie pumpkin and banana breads!There's mollassses in it I'm sure! Any of these bring back memories or thoughts of NE "regional foods"? Happy eating! KokomoJoe
#54
alesrus
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/16 14:27:38 (permalink)
Lucky Bishop

Frito pie ?? Sounds Good ! Would you mind telling us more about it??

#55
Lucky Bishop
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/16 14:54:32 (permalink)
Oh, dear lord, I keep forgetting that not everyone knows about Frito Pie.

In its simplest form, it's a small bag of Fritos cut open on the side with a ladle of chili poured in and topped with mild cheddar cheese. This is what you get at snack bars and concession stands around the southwest, and the canonical version.

There's also a homestyle version that's basically a casserole of chili and Fritos mixed together and spread in a pan, then topped heavily with cheese and baked for about 20 minutes.
#56
wanderingjew
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/16 15:17:13 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by Lucky Bishop

Oh, dear lord, I keep forgetting that not everyone knows about Frito Pie.

In its simplest form, it's a small bag of Fritos cut open on the side with a ladle of chili poured in and topped with mild cheddar cheese. This is what you get at snack bars and concession stands around the southwest, and the canonical version.

There's also a homestyle version that's basically a casserole of chili and Fritos mixed together and spread in a pan, then topped heavily with cheese and baked for about 20 minutes.


I remember the first time I had frito pie. I was en route moving from Seattle to Pittsburgh back in January '96. I took the southern route thinking I would avoid the torrential snow in the mountain passes of Idaho and Montana. I couldn't deal with the thought of putting chains on my tires. Well everything was fine until I hit Oklahoma City. The day after I arrived I hit a snow storm with 15 degree temperatures and 30 mph winds. Of course in Oklahoma, no one ever heard of sand, salt and snow plows. I managed to drive 100 miles to Tulsa on solid ice and checked into the Econolodge after stopping at the metro diner for a chicken fried steak lunch (why I remember this I'll never know) Anyway, there was take out joint across from the motel which had bbq, frito pie, etc. I tried the frito pie, and If I can recall, it had raw onions in them. It was quite good. But unfortunately I haven't had frito pie since.
#57
tiki
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/16 15:29:20 (permalink)
I've had bean pie often and its GOOD! The first i had was at the Black Muslim Bakery in Oakland/Berekely years ago. Recently i have seen a guy from LA--not a Nation Islam follower,who is "The Bean Pie Guy" --he is a very good vendor at Blues Festivals on the west coast and i make it a point to grab one of his pies whenever i see him. I may have a recipe that i got from a soulfood recipe swap site,if anyone is interested let me know and i will ferret it out oif the bowls of my computer.
#58
SpicyJenny
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/16 19:38:05 (permalink)
Here in South Florida, Black Bean Soup seems to be on most lunch/dinner menus. Of course, due to our large Cuban American population, there are plenty of Cuban restaurants. But, that Black Bean Soup shows up just about everywhere, regardless of the type of eatery.
#59
Ort. Carlton.
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RE: Unique Regional Cuisine Defined by Location 2003/09/16 20:35:10 (permalink)
Dearfolk,
Has anyone ever heard of Nestlerode Pudding? My Mother was originally from Ohio, and she extolled it as a local specialty around where she grew up (Oxford/Middletown/Hamilton). Apparently it didn't travel very far, because I've seen almost no reference to it anywhere. Has anyone got a recipe/story/anecdote/antedote?
Not Pudding Y'all On, Ort. Carlton, Along The Nestle Road To Athens, Georgia.
P. S. There is not apparently any connection to the food purveyor Nestle'... pure happenstance.
#60
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