Equipment list

Post
dogman
Junior Burger
2007/12/14 05:11:29
Opening up a hot dog restaurant and trying to put together a equipment list. I will be steaming with the option to have grilled dogs as well. Do hot dog restaurants use regular steam tables for dogs and buns or is it something else? I know I've seen the roll top hoods on these tables. Also, trying to come up with a good flow system as well as speed will be key to do high volume sales. If anyone in the business has pictures of a layout or drawings it would be great![url='mailto:vabbq1@aol.com']vabbq1@aol.com[/url]
UncleVic
Sirloin
RE: Equipment list 2007/12/14 16:20:21
You're questions are of a true novice. I strongly suggest making a minor investment in HotDogU. (www.hotdogu.com) Most questions will be answered thru the course, and if not, you have pros to question.. Mark at HotDogU is good people, he'd bend over backwards to answer your questions. (consider the class a business / learning expense). Just a side note, his course is for a mobile food service biz, but the info should be easily carried into the brick and mortar end..

Dr of BBQ
Filet Mignon
RE: Equipment list 2007/12/15 00:27:18
quote:
Originally posted by chicagostyledog
Vic,During January, February, and March, we're offering a specialized program for would-be vendors seeking to open a hot dog stand. One day of class and one day of "Behind-the-Counter" training at a hot dog stand. The program will be offered mid-week. Class size limited to two.CSD




I'm opening a BBQ school! LMAO
dogman
Junior Burger
RE: Equipment list 2007/12/15 08:12:52
Thanks for the feedback! I've owned a restaurant for 3 years that is pretty successful and back in the early 90's had a couple of dog carts myself. I guess I could go to some of the better hot dog restaurants and take notes on thier systems and equipment. The business part shouldnt be a problem. I just want to start with a good floor plan that will incorporate speed, ease of operation and structure.
dogman
Junior Burger
RE: Equipment list 2007/12/15 09:02:30
Dr. BBQ, I think Paul Kirk already beat you to the BBQ School. That's what my current restaurant is....BBQ
dogman
Junior Burger
RE: Equipment list 2007/12/15 09:34:49
Yeah, little pricier than Hot Dog U. Steve wants 3K. Yes, you stay at the wonderful resort but hell, how much you going to really learn in 3 days. It has taken me 10 years to make great Que and I am still learning a thing or two!

I figure with a Hot Dog Restaurant I will be fully utilizing every aspect of the pig!
Dr of BBQ
Filet Mignon
RE: Equipment list 2007/12/15 11:22:52
quote:
Originally posted by dogman
Yeah, little pricier than Hot Dog U. Steve wants 3K. Yes, you stay at the wonderful resort but hell, how much you going to really learn in 3 days. It has taken me 10 years to make great Que and I am still learning a thing or two!


Boy if that isn't the truth. Every day is a new life lesson when you cook Q. It never stops, and I never stop learning. Well I have to go cook now (ribs and Tips) in four inches of snow.
Jack
kensandyeggo
Double Cheeseburger
RE: Equipment list 2007/12/15 19:33:24
Too many factors for someone to give you a floor plan. The size and shape of your location will determine a lot of that. Basically, you'll need a steam-table (we use a 4-well with 3 dome-lids and one well with flat lids where we heat up the dogs and sausages before putting them under one of the domes.

You'll also need a reefer and a freezer. Canned or fountain drinks is your choice. The gub'mint will determine the rest.....sink system, hand sink(s)can-wash, exit lights, hot-water heater capacity, electrical capacity and on and on and on. In most urban areas, you'll need an architect to submit drawings for approval and a licensed, insured contractor and licensed insured sub-contractors. I think you can act as your own contractor if you feel confident about it. We have a 400 sq. ft. joint and the logistics were mind-boggling. If the place was a former food joint, that helps a lot.
dogman
Junior Burger
RE: Equipment list 2007/12/22 15:31:08
quote:
Originally posted by kensandyeggo

Too many factors for someone to give you a floor plan. The size and shape of your location will determine a lot of that. Basically, you'll need a steam-table (we use a 4-well with 3 dome-lids and one well with flat lids where we heat up the dogs and sausages before putting them under one of the domes.

You'll also need a reefer and a freezer. Canned or fountain drinks is your choice. The gub'mint will determine the rest.....sink system, hand sink(s)can-wash, exit lights, hot-water heater capacity, electrical capacity and on and on and on. In most urban areas, you'll need an architect to submit drawings for approval and a licensed, insured contractor and licensed insured sub-contractors. I think you can act as your own contractor if you feel confident about it. We have a 400 sq. ft. joint and the logistics were mind-boggling. If the place was a former food joint, that helps a lot.



My location will be a store of about 1500sqft. I plan on offering steamed dogs and grilled if preferred. Also, a few sandwiches, beer, high and low end sodas with a 50's theme. I'm trying to open a destination hot dog joint. Something people will travel for. It will also be located right off Interstate
Dr of BBQ
Filet Mignon
RE: Equipment list 2007/12/24 21:19:38
quote:
Originally posted by dogman
Dr. BBQ, I think Paul Kirk already beat you to the BBQ School. That's what my current restaurant is....BBQ


Not to steal the thread but: I know Paul I cooked with him on the Klose team, at the world championship he is a BBQ Magician. And over and above that a heck of a nice guy. I can't remember his daughters name but she was a looker last time I saw her.I shouldn't say I cooked with him I pretty much followed him around and watched what he did.

The problem with any school is they just can't teach enough in 3 or 4 days let alone a week or two for a guy or gal to run a successful operation. I have been cooking BBQ for some time now and I learn something almost every day. And it's 50% BBQ and 50% business, in fact that's the part I like the best. I love the struggle of overcoming the problems that arise or the challenges that crop up when you try to do things better and improve on your own system. If I had it all down to a science, I'd be bored and find something else to do for a living.But that just my personality I guess.I'm going to post another thread that relates to this topic so look for step van build out.

Jack
UncleVic
Sirloin
RE: Equipment list 2007/12/25 00:42:50
quote:
Originally posted by dogman

Thanks for the feedback! I've owned a restaurant for 3 years that is pretty successful and back in the early 90's had a couple of dog carts myself. I guess I could go to some of the better hot dog restaurants and take notes on thier systems and equipment. The business part shouldnt be a problem. I just want to start with a good floor plan that will incorporate speed, ease of operation and structure.


Well, then you should know the equipment to say the least.. Set it up in your garage or basement and play with it (the production line). Create a worse case scenario (someone that don't know the food biz) and see how well they can handle it after an hour or so of training. Take their input on what they don't like, then try it on another victim, and get their input as well. Simple things like being right handed and left handed could throw the design off, along with height and reach. Most lines are learned, employees reaching out of habit (same location of the product every time), but simplifying this reach and location aspect with their input could prove worthy in speed.
dogman
Junior Burger
RE: Equipment list 2007/12/25 07:26:57
quote:
Originally posted by UncleVic

quote:
Originally posted by dogman

Thanks for the feedback! I've owned a restaurant for 3 years that is pretty successful and back in the early 90's had a couple of dog carts myself. I guess I could go to some of the better hot dog restaurants and take notes on thier systems and equipment. The business part shouldnt be a problem. I just want to start with a good floor plan that will incorporate speed, ease of operation and structure.


Well, then you should know the equipment to say the least.. Set it up in your garage or basement and play with it (the production line). Create a worse case scenario (someone that don't know the food biz) and see how well they can handle it after an hour or so of training. Take their input on what they don't like, then try it on another victim, and get their input as well. Simple things like being right handed and left handed could throw the design off, along with height and reach. Most lines are learned, employees reaching out of habit (same location of the product every time), but simplifying this reach and location aspect with their input could prove worthy in speed.


Thanks Uncle Vic!

I'm with you on the umb it down part. It took me trail and error to get a system down that "even a caveman could do it"!!

I guess what I was really looking for is maybe some pics of someone elses line in a hot dog environment.

Thanks and Merry Exmas!
Sonny Funzio
Double Cheeseburger
RE: Equipment list 2007/12/27 17:16:41

Dogman, here's a few suggestions ...

1) become acquainted with some possibilities for your floorplan and equipment. From other restaurants - books on commercial kitchens (try large bookstores and local college culinary arts programs) - equip suppliers etc.

2) find out if the health department has any information about floorplans and any equipment specs they require etc on a (their) website.
Get as much advance info as possible. If you call them at this time, have a list of questions prepared in advance and sweet talk the secretary as possible - dig for every bit of information you can. If you actually get the inspector on the phone - ask him when the best time to call is once you get a bit better prepared.
If it's possible to eventually be on an inspector's good side, being prepared when you deal with him/her will help.

3) Call the local *Building* Department to determine anything they will also require of you. Have them come out if they are willing to examine your proposed premises. This starts, and is the foundation for, your startup expense list ... and unless you have an unlimited amount of capital, also impacts the other things you will or will not have money for.
(while you're talking to them, for future reference, ask whether they have any part in the process of getting your liquor/beer license while you're at it)

4) now while re-evaluating your running-list of accumulating costs for refrigeration repairs, grease trap replacements, ventilation system replacements, digging up the floors etc etc ... put together a *tentative* floor plan and equipment list along with spec sheets for EACH potential piece of equipment. New ... used ... leased ... etc.

5) *Now* call the Health Department inspector and find out the specifics for floorplans and equipment they will require of you. Try to talk to the person who will actually handle your case. Have your written tentative floor plan in-hand as you talk. Never assume that because something was used by a previous tenant it will be acceptable now. Don't forget to find out the fee they will charge to evaluate your plans/drawings and open your case. Try to get a brief comment on each piece of your equipment. Go to the bar for the rest of the day.

6) go back and re-figure what you can now afford ... re-do your floorplans and equipment lists accordingly. Double and triple check that everything is in order ... then, submit your drawings/plans and go to church - pray and light candles.

7) finally, once your plans are *approved*, now and ONLY now go and obtain ANY equipment.

It is an expensive mistake to spend money on equipment that will turn out not to be acceptable. It is amazing how quickly new restaurant setup and opening costs can stack up. You can get bit in the ass easily and not have seen it coming. Get bit hard enough and you'll be out of business before you even get going.

Best of luck,
Sonny
kensandyeggo
Double Cheeseburger
RE: Equipment list 2007/12/28 22:10:10
But, be ready for the city/county that won't tell you what time it is before you hand in plans drawn up by an architect. They'll then dissect them and tell you the changes necessary, but not before you submit the plans.....with a fee, of course. If you have to go this route, get an architect that specializes in food places in your area. Many places charge for each re-submission of plans.
MiamiDon
Filet Mignon
RE: Equipment list 2007/12/29 08:47:45
Dogman,

If you have time, I would love to see some photos and commentary about your experiences opening the new 'dog shop. No doubt, other would also.

Thanks.