PICKLED BEANS

Post
skylar0ne
Cheeseburger
2003/09/25 13:05:10
Is anybody here familiar with pickled green beans? My grandparents used to go to my great aunt's house in Wilkesboro, and she would give them jars of green beans that she had pickled somehow in a crock, like the way they used to make saurkraut. I have bought canned dilled beans off the grocery store shelf, but they don't even begin to approach the taste of those homemade ones Aunt Vera used to make...anybody ever heard of this? Hillbilly, are you familiar with pickled beans?
KimChee43
Cheeseburger
RE: PICKLED BEANS 2003/09/25 13:28:46
SKYLARONE: My mother-in-law used to make what she called "Dilled Green Beans"...fresh dillweed, a clove of garlic, some red pepper flakes, and fresh, young green beans stacked in a jar, with vinegar poured over them. I remember that it was a regular canning project for her with the waterbath, Mason jars, etc. I don't can, so forgive me if my description isn't the greatest. Is this kind of what you're looking for? If so, I will dig up the recipe for you.
Mayhaw Man
Double Cheeseburger
RE: PICKLED BEANS 2003/09/25 13:53:34
quote:
Originally posted by skylar0ne

Is anybody here familiar with pickled green beans? My grandparents used to go to my great aunt's house in Wilkesboro, and she would give them jars of green beans that she had pickled somehow in a crock, like the way they used to make saurkraut. I have bought canned dilled beans off the grocery store shelf, but they don't even begin to approach the taste of those homemade ones Aunt Vera used to make...anybody ever heard of this? Hillbilly, are you familiar with pickled beans?


I put up twelve quarts of pickled beans about two weeks ago. Whaddya wanta know. Any fool can do it. When I get home I will post my Mom's brine recipe. You make it by the gallon and use when needed (in my case a couple of jars worth a day off of my kentucky wonders and I sacrificed a few rattlesnakes (green beans that is, although there is a sake frim Okinawa with pickled poisonous snakes in it, but that's another thread" />) to see how they would do (I suspect they will be a mite tough).

If you are looking for commercial brands the Tabasco(R) ones are pretty good, but some might not like them quite that spicy. Although they are the brand used by The Columns Hotel in New Orleans (hey Elise, have you called those guys, awesome wedding and reception spot right on the avenue) on St Charles Avenue, the makers of the finest bloody mary in New Orleans and a really cool place to boot (Louis Malle's Pretty Baby with young vixennette Brooke Sheilds and slightly older vixen Susan Sarandon was filmed there).
Lone Star
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: PICKLED BEANS 2003/09/25 14:10:18
Mayhaw - do you pickle okra the same way? I think I would like to try making my own. I can't seem to find any hot enough!
Hillbilly
Double Cheeseburger
RE: PICKLED BEANS 2003/09/25 17:21:15
quote:
Originally posted by skylar0ne

Is anybody here familiar with pickled green beans? My grandparents used to go to my great aunt's house in Wilkesboro, and she would give them jars of green beans that she had pickled somehow in a crock, like the way they used to make saurkraut. I have bought canned dilled beans off the grocery store shelf, but they don't even begin to approach the taste of those homemade ones Aunt Vera used to make...anybody ever heard of this? Hillbilly, are you familiar with pickled beans?

I most certainly am familiar with pickled beans, as are most people from Wilkes County, NC. We fixed them the same way we did sauerkraut and pickled cucumbers, in an earthenware churn covered by a heavy cotton cloth. We would take them out of the churn and warm them in a cast iron skillet, put on the table with some skillet fried potatoes, a glass of buttermilk and a cake of corn bread and have a feast! My wife "put some up" about every year until we started travelling full time 4 years ago. I will see if she still has the recipe. We still pickle boiled eggs in a vinegar and beet juice (for a nice red color) mixture for a couple of weeks and enjoy the hell out of them, too.
Bushie
Filet Mignon
RE: PICKLED BEANS 2003/09/25 20:05:54
Mayhaw, please post that brine recipe of your Mom's.

A question: Do you also put up Salt Pickles? If so, I would LOVE to have your recipe.

Mayhaw Man
Double Cheeseburger
RE: PICKLED BEANS 2003/09/25 22:36:08
Here is the deal. It is nothing special until you do it for a while and get the adjustments down to your own taste, but no joke and I am not trying to sound like some cracker bragging about his mama, but she does make amazing pickles. The boys that hang around my house (not just my kids but their friends) will eat these things until they have to be stopped. I can only get so many from her. I do lots of canning and so forth, but her pickles with my daddy's cucumbers are awesome.

Brooksie's Dill Pickles

Sterilize jars and pack into each jar beans or cucumbers (standing end on end) along with one large clove garlic, one tabasco or other small hot pepper, 1 dill stalk top

Brine
1 Quart White Vinegar
3 Quarts DISTILLED Water
1 scant cup salt

Heat brine to boiling and pour over cucumbers in jars.

Seal and Invert Jars until cool

Ready to eat in three or 4 weeks

Many times the dill will be ready in your garden before the cucumbers. In that case you may preserve the dill by breaking into 2 inch pieces and putting into large jar and pouring mixed brine solution on it until covered. Keep this jar in a dark place and when the cucumbers are ready use the dill AND the brine, but remove the dill from the brine before boiling.



There you go simple and easy. You will notice that the cucumbers are never blanched or par boiled, etc. The beans should not be either, although I have noticed that they really take 4 to 6 weeks, just a little longer than the cukes.

Incidentally, the dill will keep until after the nuclear war (when there will be a great shortage of dill pickles and Mama's to make them) as long as it is kept in the dark

Hey Bushie, My brother in Round Rock has got a stach of these things if you screw yours up, but he was always bad about sharing

skylar0ne
Cheeseburger
RE: PICKLED BEANS 2003/09/26 17:31:50
quote:
We would take them out of the churn and warm them in a cast iron skillet, put on the table with some skillet fried potatoes, a glass of buttermilk and a cake of corn bread and have a feast!


Boy, does that ever bring back some wonderful memories! My great aunt and uncle lived on and took care of the old Suncrest Orchard there in Wilkes county, then when Holly Farms bought the place, they took care of the chickens until Uncle Belo died. Aunt Vera usually always had pickled beans, and she always gave some to my Granpa when we went to visit. He loved them so much he'd eat them three times a day until they were gone. Grandma always heated them in the iron skillet too, on a wood stove. Now those, my friend, were the days!
cindyloo
Cheeseburger
RE: PICKLED BEANS 2003/09/26 17:41:39
Pickled beans sound very yummy. Might they be a nice garnish for a bloody mary?

And what about snippled beans? Seems like my mom and aunt used to make them, but I haven't seen them in years. I think they're a German thing. The green beans were cut thin at an angle, then it seems like they were very heavily salted and canned. I'm sure there was bacon or salt pork in there, too. If I remember correctly, they had to be rinsed once or twice before they were eaten to get rid of all that sale. It seems like they actually had a gadget/machine to cut them. Aptly called a bean snippler. Mom served them as a side along with hot german potato salad, homemade applesauce (often eaten on top of the snippled beans), and whatever meat she fancied to cook that day.

Is this ringing a bell with anyone?

Cindy
Bushie
Filet Mignon
RE: PICKLED BEANS 2003/09/26 18:09:20
quote:
Originally posted by cindyloo

Pickled beans sound very yummy. Might they be a nice garnish for a bloody mary?

And what about snippled beans? Seems like my mom and aunt used to make them, but I haven't seen them in years. I think they're a German thing.

Pickled beans are wonderful as a Bloody Mary garnish, but you can't stop at just one! (The beans, I meant, but it's also hard to stop at just one Bloody Mary. )

The snippled beans you talk about sound like what I've had at a German restaurant a little ways north of here (north of Austin), but I'm not positive. They usually always have a green bean dish on their buffet. I'll be up there at least a couple of times for Oktoberfest, so I'll pay more attention.
Liketoeat
Double Cheeseburger
RE: PICKLED BEANS 2003/09/26 18:19:58
While I do like pickled green beans, hope other posters to this topic will forgive my diversion here, for just had to mention to skylarOne that he/she is the only person I've encountered who also had an Aunt Vera. My Aunt Vera was an excellent cook in all regards, but I remember particularly her specialties being roast chicken, gravy, and rice (which my mother got to doing just about as well), but my mother (her sister-in-law) or my other aunt (her sister) could never approach her coconut cake, even when following precisely her recipe - a fact they both readily admitted. And I have never eaten any other coconut cake which remotely approached hers in flavor, lightness, just total deliciousness. Don't know what her magic touch with coconut cake was, but it was there. Again, pardon me, now back to the green beans.
JJAY
Junior Burger
RE: PICKLED BEANS 2004/09/22 16:32:04
quote:
Originally posted by skylar0ne

Is anybody here familiar with pickled green beans? My grandparents used to go to my great aunt's house in Wilkesboro, and she would give them jars of green beans that she had pickled somehow in a crock, like the way they used to make saurkraut. I have bought canned dilled beans off the grocery store shelf, but they don't even begin to approach the taste of those homemade ones Aunt Vera used to make...anybody ever heard of this? Hillbilly, are you familiar with pickled beans?
JJAY
Junior Burger
RE: PICKLED BEANS 2004/09/22 16:35:07
quote:
Originally posted by skylar0ne

Is anybody here familiar with pickled green beans? My grandparents used to go to my great aunt's house in Wilkesboro, and she would give them jars of green beans that she had pickled somehow in a crock, like the way they used to make saurkraut. I have bought canned dilled beans off the grocery store shelf, but they don't even begin to approach the taste of those homemade ones Aunt Vera used to make...anybody ever heard of this? Hillbilly, are you familiar with pickled beans?
Rusty246
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: PICKLED BEANS 2004/09/22 16:48:35
quote:
Originally posted by Hillbilly

<blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<div style="border: 1px #999999 solid; background-color: #DCDCDC; padding: 4px;">Originally posted by skylar0ne

Is anybody here familiar with pickled green beans? My grandparents used to go to my great aunt's house in Wilkesboro, and she would give them jars of green beans that she had pickled somehow in a crock, like the way they used to make saurkraut. I have bought canned dilled beans off the grocery store shelf, but they don't even begin to approach the taste of those homemade ones Aunt Vera used to make...anybody ever heard of this? Hillbilly, are you familiar with pickled beans?

I most certainly am familiar with pickled beans, as are most people from Wilkes County, NC. We fixed them the same way we did sauerkraut and pickled cucumbers, in an earthenware churn covered by a heavy cotton cloth. We would take them out of the churn and warm them in a cast iron skillet, put on the table with some skillet fried potatoes, a glass of buttermilk and a cake of corn bread and have a feast! My wife "put some up" about every year until we started travelling full time 4 years ago. I will see if she still has the recipe. We still pickle boiled eggs in a vinegar and beet juice (for a nice red color) mixture for a couple of weeks and enjoy the hell out of them, too.


My Mom does the same thing with pickled eggs, but it seems that she uses white vinegar opposed to apple cider. Right, wrong, and what would be the difference? I love the eggs but leave the beets for her!
emsmom
Double Cheeseburger
RE: PICKLED BEANS 2004/09/23 09:38:58
Pickled eggs are an Easter tradition at our house. I always use the white vinegar. I also keep my dyed Easter eggs in the fridge and the day after Easter, I add them to my pickled beet mixture
quote:
Originally posted by Rusty246

quote:
Originally posted by Hillbilly

<blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<div style="border: 1px #999999 solid; background-color: #DCDCDC; padding: 4px;">Originally posted by skylar0ne

Is anybody here familiar with pickled green beans? My grandparents used to go to my great aunt's house in Wilkesboro, and she would give them jars of green beans that she had pickled somehow in a crock, like the way they used to make saurkraut. I have bought canned dilled beans off the grocery store shelf, but they don't even begin to approach the taste of those homemade ones Aunt Vera used to make...anybody ever heard of this? Hillbilly, are you familiar with pickled beans?

I most certainly am familiar with pickled beans, as are most people from Wilkes County, NC. We fixed them the same way we did sauerkraut and pickled cucumbers, in an earthenware churn covered by a heavy cotton cloth. We would take them out of the churn and warm them in a cast iron skillet, put on the table with some skillet fried potatoes, a glass of buttermilk and a cake of corn bread and have a feast! My wife "put some up" about every year until we started travelling full time 4 years ago. I will see if she still has the recipe. We still pickle boiled eggs in a vinegar and beet juice (for a nice red color) mixture for a couple of weeks and enjoy the hell out of them, too.


My Mom does the same thing with pickled eggs, but it seems that she uses white vinegar opposed to apple cider. Right, wrong, and what would be the difference? I love the eggs but leave the beets for her!
Barney
Cheeseburger
RE: PICKLED BEANS 2004/09/23 10:46:25
Along with the pickled beans, my grandma made pickled corn on the cob in a big white crock. Then, at Christmas time, when we visited in eastern KY, we'd have that tasty cob to chew on! It was a great dish and I have no idea of how to make it. Great memories of family food fests!
trolasater
Hamburger
RE: PICKLED BEANS 2004/09/23 11:41:10
quote:
Originally posted by Barney

Along with the pickled beans, my grandma made pickled corn on the cob in a big white crock. Then, at Christmas time, when we visited in eastern KY, we'd have that tasty cob to chew on! It was a great dish and I have no idea of how to make it. Great memories of family food fests!


A farm family that sold my grandmother bought butter and eggs used to take sweet corn cobs and make roasting ear wine. Pearl would pick white corn (in Eastern North Carolina, yellow corn was fed to mules) and cut the kernels off. She wouldn't scrape the cobs, but would stand them vertically in a stoneware churn and cover them with boiling water. Enough fresh corn remained to ferment in a few days. The end result was slightly sweet and smelled like corn. I only got a sip because I was small, but supposedly it had a real kick.

Pearl made her own saurkraut and put whole apples in along with the cabbage. These would be chopped up and browned along with the kraut.

I have heard rumors of pickled turnips made like saurkraut, but have never tasted any.
emsmom
Double Cheeseburger
RE: PICKLED BEANS 2004/09/23 11:50:55
My Grandmother always made kraut. She had a big crock on her closed in back porch and would fill it with the cabbage and put the lid on and a big rock on top. She also made pickled beets. It remember the big black pot that they would have out in the yard and would light a fire underneath and bring the beets in from the garden and cook them before the pickled them.
UncleVic
Sirloin
RE: PICKLED BEANS 2004/09/23 12:18:03
quote:
Originally posted by Mayhaw Man

Here is the deal. It is nothing special until you do it for a while and get the adjustments down to your own taste, but no joke and I am not trying to sound like some cracker bragging about his mama, but she does make amazing pickles. The boys that hang around my house (not just my kids but their friends) will eat these things until they have to be stopped. I can only get so many from her. I do lots of canning and so forth, but her pickles with my daddy's cucumbers are awesome.

Brooksie's Dill Pickles

Sterilize jars and pack into each jar beans or cucumbers (standing end on end) along with one large clove garlic, one tabasco or other small hot pepper, 1 dill stalk top

Brine
1 Quart White Vinegar
3 Quarts DISTILLED Water
1 scant cup salt

Heat brine to boiling and pour over cucumbers in jars.

Seal and Invert Jars until cool

Ready to eat in three or 4 weeks

Many times the dill will be ready in your garden before the cucumbers. In that case you may preserve the dill by breaking into 2 inch pieces and putting into large jar and pouring mixed brine solution on it until covered. Keep this jar in a dark place and when the cucumbers are ready use the dill AND the brine, but remove the dill from the brine before boiling.



There you go simple and easy. You will notice that the cucumbers are never blanched or par boiled, etc. The beans should not be either, although I have noticed that they really take 4 to 6 weeks, just a little longer than the cukes.

Incidentally, the dill will keep until after the nuclear war (when there will be a great shortage of dill pickles and Mama's to make them) as long as it is kept in the dark

Hey Bushie, My brother in Round Rock has got a stach of these things if you screw yours up, but he was always bad about sharing




Thank You for sharing this recipe!
Hillbilly
Double Cheeseburger
RE: PICKLED BEANS 2004/09/23 12:39:50
quote:
Originally posted by emsmom

My Grandmother always made kraut. She had a big crock on her closed in back porch and would fill it with the cabbage and put the lid on and a big rock on top. She also made pickled beets. It remember the big black pot that they would have out in the yard and would light a fire underneath and bring the beets in from the garden and cook them before the pickled them.

I remember my grandmother's pickled peaches! With no electricity in the North Carolina hills until the 1940s, she became adept at pickling, canning, preserving, drying and curing the home grown bounty for out of season use.
emsmom
Double Cheeseburger
RE: PICKLED BEANS 2004/09/23 15:45:58
I had forgotten about pickled peaches. My Mom always made them each year. We would get a special size peach and she would pickle those with cloves in the jar. I remember one year we took some to a family reunion and some of the people acted like they were scared to try them. They were wonderful.
WILLS
Junior Burger
RE: PICKLED BEANS 2004/11/06 09:34:25
YES, I AM FAMILIAR WITH THE BEANS OF WHICH YOU SPEAK. MY RELATIVES IN W.V (GRAFTON AREA), USED TO MAKE THE BEST. IN FACT WHEN I WAS A KID IN INDIANA, I CAN STILL REMEMBER HELPING MY MOTHER MAKE THE INFAMOUS "PICKLED BEAN". MY MOUTH IS WATERING THINKING ABOUT IT. NOTHING LIKE IT IN THE WORLD.
DAVE WILLS, NAPOLEON OH.
quote:
Originally posted by skylar0ne

Is anybody here familiar with pickled green beans? My grandparents used to go to my great aunt's house in Wilkesboro, and she would give them jars of green beans that she had pickled somehow in a crock, like the way they used to make saurkraut. I have bought canned dilled beans off the grocery store shelf, but they don't even begin to approach the taste of those homemade ones Aunt Vera used to make...anybody ever heard of this? Hillbilly, are you familiar with pickled beans?
CarolinaBill
Cheeseburger
RE: PICKLED BEANS 2004/11/10 15:10:48
MMMMMMMMMMM - pickled green beans!!!!

Love anything pickled, but favorite has to be pickled okra!
marycath
Junior Burger
RE: PICKLED BEANS 2004/12/07 10:34:06
quote:
Originally posted by cindyloo

Pickled beans sound very yummy. Might they be a nice garnish for a bloody mary?

And what about snippled beans? Seems like my mom and aunt used to make them, but I haven't seen them in years. I think they're a German thing. The green beans were cut thin at an angle, then it seems like they were very heavily salted and canned. I'm sure there was bacon or salt pork in there, too. If I remember correctly, they had to be rinsed once or twice before they were eaten to get rid of all that sale. It seems like they actually had a gadget/machine to cut them. Aptly called a bean snippler. Mom served them as a side along with hot german potato salad, homemade applesauce (often eaten on top of the snippled beans), and whatever meat she fancied to cook that day.

Is this ringing a bell with anyone?

Cindy
jmckee
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: PICKLED BEANS 2004/12/07 11:06:40
I am indeed familiar. There's a recipe in A Gracious Plenty, a marvelous book about Southern food. These are pickled in a heavily dilled solution. They're great as an alternative to celery in a Bloody Mary.
gottatravel
Hamburger
RE: PICKLED BEANS 2004/12/07 11:46:28
Hello from cold and wet Pennsylvania Dutch Country.
Around here they seem to pickle almost anything you can think of.
For a few online sites Google "Jake and Amos" or "Intercourse Canning Company"
I think they are almost one and the same but both are interseting to look at.
Donna Douglass
Double Cheeseburger
RE: PICKLED BEANS 2004/12/07 12:17:27
Having read these posts regarding pickled green beans set me to thinking....why wouldn't my short cut that I use for pickled Brussels Sprouts, work for green beans? So I saved the brine from a jar of the refrigerated dill pickles I love, briefly cooked some tender green beans from Trader Joe's and put them while still hot, in the jar of pickle juice. They are delicious, believe me. I know this is the lazy woman's way of pickling something, but it works and supplies the two of us with just the right amount of whatever we want pickled. Now onward to trying other veggies in the brine.

Donna