Regional breakfasts

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NYNM
Filet Mignon
2008/03/25 08:21:07
NM: Breakfast burritos (with lotsa green chile)
NY: Bagels w/lox & creme cheese
PA: Scrapple


Tell me more.....
MiamiDon
Filet Mignon
RE: Regional breakfasts 2008/03/25 08:49:15
Seemingly every little mom & pop latin restaurant here in Miami offers a breakfast special of huevos y tostada y cafe con leche. That's eggs, toasted and buttered cuban bread, and coffee with milk (sweet espresso with steamed milk).

A typical take-out breakfast is the same cafe con leche, with guava- or cheese-filled pastries.

The cafe con leche is on the left, the pastelito de guayaba (guava pastry) is in the front of the basket:



This basket of pastries is from El Arte Bakery on Bird Road.
NYNM
Filet Mignon
RE: Regional breakfasts 2008/03/25 09:02:24
Mmmm good, I assume that is Miami..
Also NJ: Taylor Pork Roll
NYC: Egg-on-a-roll (from deli or street cart)
the ancient mariner
Filet Mignon
RE: Regional breakfasts 2008/03/25 09:06:22
And don't forget the grits. Stopped for breakfast
in Mass. at a real roadfood type truck stop. A sign
over the counter, a big sign, said -- We now serve Grits

It seems that a lot of truck drivers are from the south
(wood U bee-leave) and now even in Mass----the home of John
Adams and the wacky Kennedy's they now serve grits.

Jimeats
Filet Mignon
RE: Regional breakfasts 2008/03/25 09:11:18
We've been serving grits in the Boston area for years. You just didn't know how to order them. We call grits Polenta. Chow Jim
ann peeples
Sirloin
RE: Regional breakfasts 2008/03/25 09:12:22
Beignets in New Orleans...
wanderingjew
Sirloin
RE: Regional breakfasts 2008/03/25 09:16:37
Here in Rhode Island, Jonnycakes (cornmeal griddle cakes) can be found at some of the diners in Sakonnet and in South County. Linguica "portuguese sausage" is also common around the East Bay and Blackstone Valley.

In Seattle and the Pacific Northwest, besides strong stellar dark roast coffee, scones are almost always included among the various bread choices with your breakfast.

jettababs
Cheeseburger
RE: Regional breakfasts 2008/03/25 09:38:47
In the heartland, it's probably more the size of the breakfast--the classic 4x4 or trucker or farm boy breakfast, with 2 eggs/sausage/bacon/pancakes/toast/sausage gravy etc.
Jim in NC
Cheeseburger
RE: Regional breakfasts 2008/03/25 09:40:12
In NC, the not-so-appetizingly named livermush. With grits and hot biscuits.
gsquared81
Junior Burger
RE: Regional breakfasts 2008/03/25 09:41:26
quote:
Originally posted by Jim in NC

In NC, the not-so-appetizingly named livermush. With grits and hot biscuits.


Livermush is one of the finer things in life
Jimeats
Filet Mignon
RE: Regional breakfasts 2008/03/25 10:29:25
Baked beans are pretty common around here, at least the joints I frequent.
Creamed cod on toast use to be available but the only places I can find it today is down Maine way. Chow Jim
Jim in NC
Cheeseburger
RE: Regional breakfasts 2008/03/25 10:35:10
Nearly vanished from commercial establishments in this area: Brains'n'eggs.
mr chips
Filet Mignon
RE: Regional breakfasts 2008/03/25 11:04:47
Salmon hash or pan-fried oysters here in the Pacific Northwest. Marionberry pancakes.
X1
Double Cheeseburger
RE: Regional breakfasts 2008/03/25 11:07:37
quote:
Originally posted by annpeeples

Beignets in New Orleans...


You took my answer!!!!

Also: Beignets w/Cafe au Lait

Grillades and Grits


Davydd
Sirloin
RE: Regional breakfasts 2008/03/25 13:24:17
I don't know if Minnesota has any regional specialty you can't get for breakfast anywhere else but I can tell you that you will most likely never find grits on the menu.
sammur
Cheeseburger
RE: Regional breakfasts 2008/03/25 13:34:36
Miami Don,
I used to eat breakfast at the Latin American Cafeteria when I was in Miami but it's been torn down. I've moved to Sergio's and Carreta's but it's not quite the same. What would you recommend for a good Cuban breakfast spot? I love to dunk my Cuban bread in my cafe con leche. Thanks.
wanderingjew
Sirloin
RE: Regional breakfasts 2008/03/25 13:46:13
quote:
Originally posted by Davydd

I don't know if Minnesota has any regional specialty you can't get for breakfast anywhere else but I can tell you that you will most likely never find grits on the menu.


I read somewhere that the "caramel roll" is somewhat unique to Minnesota.
doggydaddy
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Regional breakfasts 2008/03/25 14:04:14


Dunkin' Donuts or Breakast McGriddle wraps. Either of them served with coffee.

mark
TJ Jackson
Filet Mignon
RE: Regional breakfasts 2008/03/25 14:04:57
In Cincinnati, it's goetta
Davydd
Sirloin
RE: Regional breakfasts 2008/03/25 14:25:08
quote:
Originally posted by wanderingjew

quote:
Originally posted by Davydd

I don't know if Minnesota has any regional specialty you can't get for breakfast anywhere else but I can tell you that you will most likely never find grits on the menu.


I read somewhere that the "caramel roll" is somewhat unique to Minnesota.

Tobies in Hinckley, MN halfway between the Twin Cities and Duluth plays up the caramel roll but I don't think they are unique to Minnesota. Of course you knew I would have a picture.

MiamiDon
Filet Mignon
RE: Regional breakfasts 2008/03/25 14:28:29
quote:
Originally posted by sammur

Miami Don,
I used to eat breakfast at the Latin American Cafeteria when I was in Miami but it's been torn down. I've moved to Sergio's and Carreta's but it's not quite the same. What would you recommend for a good Cuban breakfast spot? I love to dunk my Cuban bread in my cafe con leche. Thanks.


Where do you stay when you visit? I'd hate to send you all the way across town.

The "Latin American Cafeteria" name has resurfaced at three locations. They have received some promising reviews, and I got a good take-out Cuban sandwich from the Sunset Drive location. I don't know whether there is any relationship to the old one on Coral Way.

One is in the Bayside Marketplace downtown.

Another is at 9608 SW 72 Street (Sunset Drive two miles west of the Palmetto Expressway).

The third is at 2740 SW 27 Avenue (27 Ave between Coral Way and US-1).

If you are on South Beach, I would recommend Puerto Sagua, at 700 Collins Ave (Collins & 7th Street)

If you want to go to the heart of Cuban Calle Ocho (8th Street), I would recommend Versailles as a tourists' "gotta see", and they do Cuban breakfasts well. 3555 SW 8th Street. Here is the 3 Guys from Miami take that I found when looking up the address, with some photos:

http://3guysfrommiami.com/versailles.html

Except for Versailles, call before you go. Restaurants open and close like crazy here.
iqdiva
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Regional breakfasts 2008/03/25 14:30:53
Biscuits,grits,eggs,sausage,ham,or bacon ( or salmon patties,fried fish,seafood,chicken,pork chops,or steak )gravy,preserves,cane syrup or honey,butter, hot coffee...Typical southeast Alabama old-time breakfast ! The best !
wanderingjew
Sirloin
RE: Regional breakfasts 2008/03/25 14:56:03
quote:
Originally posted by Davydd

quote:
Originally posted by wanderingjew

quote:
Originally posted by Davydd

I don't know if Minnesota has any regional specialty you can't get for breakfast anywhere else but I can tell you that you will most likely never find grits on the menu.


I read somewhere that the "caramel roll" is somewhat unique to Minnesota.

Tobies in Hinckley, MN halfway between the Twin Cities and Duluth plays up the caramel roll but I don't think they are unique to Minnesota. Of course you knew I would have a picture.


I haven't really seen them around here, or in the NYC area or even Pittsburgh, maybe when I lived in Seattle, but I'm not really sure. It probably isn't "unique" to Minnesota but is generally probably more of a Northern Midwest thing...

BTW, I'm surprised you don't have a photo of a BPT served on top of a Caramel Roll!" />
enginecapt
Filet Mignon
RE: Regional breakfasts 2008/03/25 15:13:42
Chorizo and scrambled eggs with papas (fried potatoes), either on the plate or stuffed in a tortilla.
Davydd
Sirloin
RE: Regional breakfasts 2008/03/25 15:43:33
quote:
Originally posted by wanderingjew


BTW, I'm surprised you don't have a photo of a BPT served on top of a Caramel Roll!" />

Tempting me aren't you. Would you accept a breaded walleye instead of bacon for breakfast?



That's the Angler's Breakfast at the Blue Waters Cafe in Grand Marais, MN. Now that is truly regional.
tiki
Filet Mignon
RE: Regional breakfasts 2008/03/25 15:51:59
quote:
Originally posted by Davydd

quote:
Originally posted by wanderingjew


BTW, I'm surprised you don't have a photo of a BPT served on top of a Caramel Roll!" />

Tempting me aren't you. Would you accept a breaded walleye instead of bacon for breakfast?



That's the Angler's Breakfast at the Blue Waters Cafe in Grand Marais, MN. Now that is truly regional.



And BEAUTIFUL!!!
Doatsie82
Cheeseburger
RE: Regional breakfasts 2008/03/25 16:04:48
In San Diego it's the egg, cheese, bean and pico de gallo buritto with hot salsa on the side. Oh, now I want one and it's after 1 pm! Doatsie
Big Ugly Mich
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Regional breakfasts 2008/03/25 16:05:51
http://www.franksdinerkenosha.com/

George Webb's is good, too.
ann peeples
Sirloin
RE: Regional breakfasts 2008/03/25 16:20:59
If its a stop at a bakery here in the Milw.area, you have to get a cruller!!
naxet76
Cheeseburger
RE: Regional breakfasts 2008/03/25 23:32:38
In south texas:
Huevos rancheros, with refried beans, fried potatoes, bacon, tortillas, coffee/juice. And on the weekends...all this PLUS barbacoa and a bowl of menudo. Well, that's how we eat at my hubby's grandmother's house anyway! And yes,except for the barbacoa and menudo, it's all cooked by his 98 year old grandmother in---you guessed it, lard!
MellowRoast
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Regional breakfasts 2008/03/26 02:52:02
I don't know if it's common throughout the state, but I fell in love with tomato gravy & biscuits from Pea Ridge, Alabama almost 30 years ago, and I've been eating it ever since.

It's prepared as you would regular sausage gravy, but instead of milk you add tomatoes fresh out of a blender along with a dash of Worcestershire and Tabasco.

It's the most delicious breakfast I've ever eaten, and looks beautiful on a plate.
leethebard
Sirloin
RE: Regional breakfasts 2008/03/26 04:29:03
Now..that is something different!!!!
sammur
Cheeseburger
RE: Regional breakfasts 2008/03/26 09:18:26
Miami Don, thanks so much for your reply.
I'm in Coconut Grove every Jan on business. I know that the LAC on 27th is gone and I think the one on Coral way is out of business. You are right about Versailles, it's a must. Do you know anything about El Pub on Calle 8 for breakfast?
MiamiDon
Filet Mignon
RE: Regional breakfasts 2008/03/26 09:40:07
quote:
Originally posted by sammur

Miami Don, thanks so much for your reply.
I'm in Coconut Grove every Jan on business. I know that the LAC on 27th is gone and I think the one on Coral way is out of business. You are right about Versailles, it's a must. Do you know anything about El Pub on Calle 8 for breakfast?


I've never been there for breakfast, and it has been years since I had lunch there.

I looked on their web site,

http://www.elpubrestaurant.com/index1.htm

but, I could not find breakfast dishes on the menu, nor the operating hours. As they have a cafe window, they might have an abreviated (toast, pastries) breakfast menu. Well, since you have until January, I'll go have a look. I can always use a coffee break!
RubyRose
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Regional breakfasts 2008/03/26 09:49:38
Many diners/family restaurants in this area of eastern PA have a dish usually called “farmers’ breakfast” on the menu. It’s fried diced or sliced potatoes, ham and onions (and occasionally peppers) with a couple of beaten eggs poured on top and cooked until firm. It’s served in one piece and covers the whole plate.

Since nearly all of the diners here are Greek owned, spinach and feta cheese omelets are on most menus. Two items that are rarely seen are grits and sausage gravy, although dried beef gravy (creamed dried beef) on toast is served in all the locally owned places.
mikez629
Cheeseburger
RE: Regional breakfasts 2008/03/26 10:05:40
Philadelphia-Creamed chipped beef over white toast
allyk
Cheeseburger
RE: Regional breakfasts 2008/03/26 19:15:50
Here in the South, fried chicken, fish, or pork chops are not unheard of with eggs, grits, biscuits and gravy. In some areas rice is served instead of grits. My personal favorite is salmon croquettes, eggs over easy, cheese grits, salmon gravy, and biscuits. Yum! MellowRoast: yes, tomato gravy is divine!
wanderingjew
Sirloin
RE: Regional breakfasts 2008/03/26 19:45:51
quote:
Originally posted by mikez629

Philadelphia-Creamed chipped beef over white toast


I see that in Baltimore alot too- actually most of Maryland
MellowRoast
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Regional breakfasts 2008/03/26 20:23:47
Allyk, when I tell people about tomato gravy & biscuits, I normally get a blank stare! Thanks for the thumbs up!

And I agree on the fried chicken & eggs for breakfast. Hard to find in restaurants, but it was the first meal I had at the Loveless Cafe back in '74.
Ort. Carlton.
Filet Mignon
RE: Regional breakfasts 2008/03/26 22:53:32
quote:
Originally posted by gsquared81
quote:
Originally posted by Jim in NC
In NC, the not-so-appetizingly named livermush. With grits and hot biscuits.

Livermush is one of the finer things in life


Oh, Dearfolk,
You ain't just whistlin' Dixie there!
My favorite of all I've tried is Frank Corriher's Hot, from China Grove, N. C. You don't need a dollop of Texas Pete with that!
Here in Georgia, I can buy Jenkins' (regular and hot) from Shelby, N. C. and Greenwood Packing from S. C.
Some recommended brands that I've tried are Mack's (regular and hot) from Shelby, N. C., Jamison's from Charlotte, and Neese's (regular liver mush and regular and hot liver pudding) from Greensboro, N. C. -- And this is only the tip of the iceberg, folks... there must be 35 brands of livermush, liver mush, and liver pudding on the market, and some of these are only sold in one county.
In S. C., liver pudding takes on another dimension as it is made with rice instead of corn, as is customary in N. C. Two leading brands there are Counts' from Prosperity, S. C. and Harvin's from Sumter.
If anyone wants to talk about their favorite brand of livermush, I'd love to hear from them -- here or in an e-mail.
Mush Obliged, Ort. Carlton in I'm Not Pudding You On Athens, Georgia.
P. S. Thanks for posting this, Jim and gsquared81... if I'd've found it earlier, I would've mentioned it sooner.
P. P. S. Y'all making me hongry!! -- I sure do wish my all-night Kroger carried livermush.
Ort. Carlton.
Filet Mignon
RE: Regional breakfasts 2008/03/26 22:57:10
quote:
Originally posted by Jim in NC
Nearly vanished from commercial establishments in this area: Brains'n'eggs.


Jim,
I am told that this is ubiquitous on mom-and-pop restaurant menus around Jefferson City, Missouri. There's also an eatery there that specializes in brain sandwiches.
One serving of brains and I've received a month's supply of cholestrol! I'd rather enjoy killing myself and eat livermush.
Feeling Mush Better Now, Ort. Carlton in Ever-Effervescent Athens, Georgia.
Ort. Carlton.
Filet Mignon
RE: Regional breakfasts 2008/03/26 23:00:26
quote:
Originally posted by X1
quote:
Originally posted by annpeeples
Beignets in New Orleans...

You took my answer!!!!
Also: Beignets w/Cafe au Lait
Grillades and Grits


Dearfolk,
On the New Orleans track, don't forget about PAIN PERDU! Only one or two places still prepare it, but it's still available at (I think it is) The Coffee Pot in The French Quarter.
Do any other places still make it? It's getting to be a PAIN to find it.
As Per Due Me, Ort. Carlton in Decidedly UnFrench Athens, Georgia.
Ort. Carlton.
Filet Mignon
RE: Regional breakfasts 2008/03/26 23:10:47
quote:
Originally posted by MellowRoast
I don't know if it's common throughout the state, but I fell in love with tomato gravy & biscuits from Pea Ridge, Alabama almost 30 years ago, and I've been eating it ever since.


MellowRoast,
Do you have any suggestions as to where I ought to go to find me some of that? I'm planning to head over to Alabama to do some research later this Spring.
It used to be served in Wauchula, Florida at a long-gone eatery run by Alabama expatriates (three generations back), but since they retired, tomato gravy (usually made with local vine-ripened tomatoes) is a bygone edible in those parts.
I wish I had me some right about now.
'Materingly Nostalgically, Ort. Carlton in Less Chilly Athens, Georgia.
NYNM
Filet Mignon
RE: Regional breakfasts 2008/03/26 23:20:27
Dear First Responders: I find your comments fascinating. Isn't it amazing that we even start the day in different ways based on location. I always enjoy hearing about regional differences. Thanks.
slcgrad
Junior Burger
RE: Regional breakfasts 2008/03/26 23:37:37
Growing up outside of Philadelphia, I used to have fried cornmeal mush with maple syrup for breakfast. Good stuff. You could buy it, frozen, at the A&P, in a long rectangular block. Is cornmeal mush gone forever now? I think there's some restaurant mentioned in Roadfood that still serves it. But I'll never remember what that restaurant is...
MellowRoast
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Regional breakfasts 2008/03/27 00:00:06
quote:
Originally posted by Ort. Carlton.

quote:
Originally posted by MellowRoast
I don't know if it's common throughout the state, but I fell in love with tomato gravy & biscuits from Pea Ridge, Alabama almost 30 years ago, and I've been eating it ever since.


MellowRoast,
Do you have any suggestions as to where I ought to go to find me some of that? I'm planning to head over to Alabama to do some research later this Spring.
It used to be served in Wauchula, Florida at a long-gone eatery run by Alabama expatriates (three generations back), but since they retired, tomato gravy (usually made with local vine-ripened tomatoes) is a bygone edible in those parts.
I wish I had me some right about now.
'Materingly Nostalgically, Ort. Carlton in Less Chilly Athens, Georgia.


I hate to tell you this, Ort. Carlton, but I don't have a clue. I don't think I've ever seen it served in a restaurant, though I've suggested it to countless proprietors. But I still received that blank stare!

It was introduced to me in Alabama homes, and I'm forever grateful. (Thank you, Susan McCoy, where ever you are!)

You're right about the fresh tomatoes (though canned will work). They were tossed in a blender so the gravy consistency would be similar to that of milk gravy. But, oh, the flavor!

Foodbme
Porterhouse
RE: Regional breakfasts 2008/03/27 01:01:21
In the old Rust Belt; Pittsburgh,Cleveland etc, breakfast for the guys coming off the "Hootowl" Shift was a Shot & a Beer Chaser with Pickled Hard Boiled Eggs at 7:05AM in a bar usually located about 50 feet outside the plant gate!
MellowRoast
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Regional breakfasts 2008/03/27 06:15:50
I'm not familiar with livermush. Guess I'll have to search for it. Have I missed out on something good?
doggydaddy
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Regional breakfasts 2008/03/27 07:35:36
quote:
Originally posted by MellowRoast

I don't know if it's common throughout the state, but I fell in love with tomato gravy & biscuits from Pea Ridge, Alabama almost 30 years ago, and I've been eating it ever since.

It's prepared as you would regular sausage gravy, but instead of milk you add tomatoes fresh out of a blender along with a dash of Worcestershire and Tabasco.

It's the most delicious breakfast I've ever eaten, and looks beautiful on a plate.


I did not know that there was a regional basis and appreciation for tomato/beef gravy for breakfast. In the Navy, we called it 'Minced Beef' and we served it on cold pre-toasted bread. Ummmm...
Though I am of the cream gravy camp, I would love to see and order tomato gravy instead.

mark
MellowRoast
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Regional breakfasts 2008/03/27 07:53:49
Mark, the only version I'm familiar with or have had is made with crumbled breakfast sausage and served over buttermilk biscuits ("biskits" as I call them). The liquefied tomatoes simply replaced the milk.

I've only seen it in Alabama, but it's possible other regions are onto the secret! I just didn't know it!




gsquared81
Junior Burger
RE: Regional breakfasts 2008/03/27 09:11:24
quote:
Originally posted by Ort. Carlton.

quote:
Originally posted by gsquared81
quote:
Originally posted by Jim in NC
In NC, the not-so-appetizingly named livermush. With grits and hot biscuits.

Livermush is one of the finer things in life


Oh, Dearfolk,
You ain't just whistlin' Dixie there!
My favorite of all I've tried is Frank Corriher's Hot, from China Grove, N. C. You don't need a dollop of Texas Pete with that!
Here in Georgia, I can buy Jenkins' (regular and hot) from Shelby, N. C. and Greenwood Packing from S. C.
Some recommended brands that I've tried are Mack's (regular and hot) from Shelby, N. C., Jamison's from Charlotte, and Neese's (regular liver mush and regular and hot liver pudding) from Greensboro, N. C. -- And this is only the tip of the iceberg, folks... there must be 35 brands of livermush, liver mush, and liver pudding on the market, and some of these are only sold in one county.
In S. C., liver pudding takes on another dimension as it is made with rice instead of corn, as is customary in N. C. Two leading brands there are Counts' from Prosperity, S. C. and Harvin's from Sumter.
If anyone wants to talk about their favorite brand of livermush, I'd love to hear from them -- here or in an e-mail.
Mush Obliged, Ort. Carlton in I'm Not Pudding You On Athens, Georgia.
P. S. Thanks for posting this, Jim and gsquared81... if I'd've found it earlier, I would've mentioned it sooner.
P. P. S. Y'all making me hongry!! -- I sure do wish my all-night Kroger carried livermush.
gsquared81
Junior Burger
RE: Regional breakfasts 2008/03/27 09:14:16
Ort. Carlton, I swear by Neese's livermush and sausages. Livermush for dinner is a staple in our house. Fry it up, and serve it with some mac & cheese, cabbage and pintos with cornbread on the side!
Jim in NC
Cheeseburger
RE: Regional breakfasts 2008/03/27 09:53:02
quote:
Originally posted by Ort. Carlton.

quote:
Originally posted by gsquared81
quote:
Originally posted by Jim in NC
In NC, the not-so-appetizingly named livermush. With grits and hot biscuits.

Livermush is one of the finer things in life


Oh, Dearfolk,
You ain't just whistlin' Dixie there!
My favorite of all I've tried is Frank Corriher's Hot, from China Grove, N. C. You don't need a dollop of Texas Pete with that!
Here in Georgia, I can buy Jenkins' (regular and hot) from Shelby, N. C. and Greenwood Packing from S. C.
Some recommended brands that I've tried are Mack's (regular and hot) from Shelby, N. C., Jamison's from Charlotte, and Neese's (regular liver mush and regular and hot liver pudding) from Greensboro, N. C. -- And this is only the tip of the iceberg, folks... there must be 35 brands of livermush, liver mush, and liver pudding on the market, and some of these are only sold in one county.
In S. C., liver pudding takes on another dimension as it is made with rice instead of corn, as is customary in N. C. Two leading brands there are Counts' from Prosperity, S. C. and Harvin's from Sumter.
If anyone wants to talk about their favorite brand of livermush, I'd love to hear from them -- here or in an e-mail.
Mush Obliged, Ort. Carlton in I'm Not Pudding You On Athens, Georgia.
P. S. Thanks for posting this, Jim and gsquared81... if I'd've found it earlier, I would've mentioned it sooner.
P. P. S. Y'all making me hongry!! -- I sure do wish my all-night Kroger carried livermush.




Ort.,
Neese's now sells both liver pudding and livermush, the difference being the puddin' is made with rice as is favored by our neighbors in SC. The livermush is a relatively new product for Neese's. Pretty similar stuff except for texture. I've got another brand for you: Hunter's from Marion, NC, from which cholestrol is coursing through my veins as I write this... I believe it's available from Asheville over to about Gastonia.
Big Ugly Mich
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Regional breakfasts 2008/03/27 12:38:49
quote:
Originally posted by MellowRoast
You're right about the fresh tomatoes (though canned will work). They were tossed in a blender so the gravy consistency would be similar to that of milk gravy. But, oh, the flavor!
There are two problems with that approach:

  1. Here in the Midwest, tomato season is too brief. I sometimes can my own tomatoes, but problem #2 will explain why even that plan has a fatal flaw.
  2. When tomatoes are ripe, that's when they make it to the tummy before they make it to the kitchen.

That's why so many of us cook with canned tomatoes.
quote:
Originally posted by slcgrad
Growing up outside of Philadelphia, I used to have fried cornmeal mush with maple syrup for breakfast. Good stuff. You could buy it, frozen, at the A&P, in a long rectangular block. Is cornmeal mush gone forever now?
I could be wrong, but I believe that's what our southern members refer to as grits. Grits do have the outer husk removed from the grain, which is why I admit I may be wrong.

Most of you know this, but canned corn is made cream style by halving each grain so the starch will make the end result cream style.
billyboy
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Regional breakfasts 2008/03/27 15:46:21
I don't know if it is available elsewhere, but I grew up on greens (sauteed escarole with olive oil and garlic) and toast at many restaurants in Rome, NY. Very Italian-American and delicious.

As part of my Breakfast Supreme Platter at the now closed Suburban Cafe in Rome, NY.


MellowRoast
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Regional breakfasts 2008/03/27 16:59:56
Never heard of greens for breakfast, Billyboy, but I wouldn't turn it down. Looks good to me!
Sundancer7
Fire Safety Admin
RE: Regional breakfasts 2008/03/27 18:37:56
quote:
Originally posted by Big Ugly Mich

quote:
Originally posted by MellowRoast
You're right about the fresh tomatoes (though canned will work). They were tossed in a blender so the gravy consistency would be similar to that of milk gravy. But, oh, the flavor!
There are two problems with that approach:

  1. Here in the Midwest, tomato season is too brief. I sometimes can my own tomatoes, but problem #2 will explain why even that plan has a fatal flaw.
  2. When tomatoes are ripe, that's when they make it to the tummy before they make it to the kitchen.

That's why so many of us cook with canned tomatoes.
quote:
Originally posted by slcgrad
Growing up outside of Philadelphia, I used to have fried cornmeal mush with maple syrup for breakfast. Good stuff. You could buy it, frozen, at the A&P, in a long rectangular block. Is cornmeal mush gone forever now?
I could be wrong, but I believe that's what our southern members refer to as grits. Grits do have the outer husk removed from the grain, which is why I admit I may be wrong.

Most of you know this, but canned corn is made cream style by halving each grain so the starch will make the end result cream style.


I do not know about the rest of the country but in Tennessee, mush is not made from grits but cornmeal. Mamaw Smith makes it all the time.

Paul E. Smith
Knoxville, TN
NYNM
Filet Mignon
RE: Regional breakfasts 2008/03/28 15:13:05
Just read that a favorite breakfast in Southern Florida for local "Crackers" is mullet & grits..
wanderingjew
Sirloin
RE: Regional breakfasts 2008/03/28 15:25:59
quote:
Originally posted by NYNM

Just read that a favorite breakfast in Southern Florida for local "Crackers" is mullet & grits..




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mayor al
Fire Safety Admin
RE: Regional breakfasts 2008/03/28 15:33:27
WJ
What or Who is That?
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