Prime Rib

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The-Porcus
Junior Burger
2003/10/04 18:02:13
I don't see anyone talking prime rib and it may be almost sacrilegious, in light of the other mouth-watering threads here, to say but to me a great prime rib rises above the best of any steak. However, as the song goes, "don't get around much anymore" so I'm wondering what say people about the best in their region? I used to frequent the venerable Durgin Park in Boston for their excellent prime and, later, came to love Jake O'Shaughenessy's in Seattle with their slow saltroasted beef. But it's been years.
Walleye
Junior Burger
RE: Prime Rib 2003/10/04 18:55:58
quote:
Originally posted by The-Porcus

I don't see anyone talking prime rib and it may be almost sacrilegious, in light of the other mouth-watering threads here, to say but to me a great prime rib rises above the best of any steak. However, as the song goes, "don't get around much anymore" so I'm wondering what say people about the best in their region? I used to frequent the venerable Durgin Park in Boston for their excellent prime and, later, came to love Jake O'Shaughenessy's in Seattle with their slow saltroasted beef. But it's been years.


That might have something to do with the fact that, except in high-end restaurants, you don't often find prime rib. Oh, it's from the rib, but the meat is usually graded Select or Choice.
peppertree
Cheeseburger
RE: Prime Rib 2003/10/04 19:05:32
Whenever I go to Las Vegas, I treat my heart and arteries to a delicious prime rib. Everyone sells it and the prices are fantastic.

It is hard to go wrong with a prime rib.
unclefudd
Junior Burger
RE: Prime Rib 2003/10/04 21:19:00
I may be wrong, but my 50-year-old memories of being an apprentice meatcutter seem to be telling me that the "prime" of prime rib has not to do with any USDA grading such as "Select" or "Choice", but rather the section of the beef side it was cut from, i.e., the "prime" or first cut of the rib section.
quote:
Originally posted by Walleye

quote:
Originally posted by The-Porcus

I don't see anyone talking prime rib and it may be almost sacrilegious, in light of the other mouth-watering threads here, to say but to me a great prime rib rises above the best of any steak. However, as the song goes, "don't get around much anymore" so I'm wondering what say people about the best in their region? I used to frequent the venerable Durgin Park in Boston for their excellent prime and, later, came to love Jake O'Shaughenessy's in Seattle with their slow saltroasted beef. But it's been years.


That might have something to do with the fact that, except in high-end restaurants, you don't often find prime rib. Oh, it's from the rib, but the meat is usually graded Select or Choice.
seafarer john
Filet Mignon
RE: Prime Rib 2003/10/04 21:53:56
A "prime rib" cut can be from any portion of the rib section of the steer.
The name implies that it is a cut from "Prime" graded beef as opposed to other grades.

My butcher of many years went out of business and I found myself searching around our area for a source of genuine "prime ribs" for our Xmas dinnner. Most buitchers were honest and said thay could not get prime beef even if they had a market for it and promised they would keep any eye out for a promising looking side of choice beef. One butcher, perhaps trained in the same school as "Unclefudd", tried to convince me that "prime rib" was merely the name of a cut of beef and had nothing to do with it's grading by USDA. I at last lucked out when my fish monger said he would get me a prime roast from a supplier of restaurants he knew in a nearby city - it was delicious. Unfortunately, prime beef is almost totally unavailable to the average consumer these days. You have to go to a very high end restaurant to get it - at a helll of a high price. I am not familiar with the widely advertised mail order sellers of Prime beef, does annyone out there have experinece with any of them?
RibDog
Double Cheeseburger
RE: Prime Rib 2003/10/04 22:28:55
I agree with Seafarer that "Prime Rib" has always referred to a standing rib roast that was graded "Prime" by the USDA. Otherwise, it should be referred to as a standing rib roast.

But if you are willing to pay for it, prime is available from a number of purveyors over the internet. If you do a search, just make sure you are dealing with someone reputable.

I myself get the Hereford aged standing rib roast from Fresh Market and I find it is of exceptional quality. I have had "prime" and this is pretty darn close. To fine a distinction for me to spend the extra money for the prime. IMHO.

John
garykg6
Cheeseburger
RE: Prime Rib 2003/10/05 08:21:39
there used to be a place in Grand Rapids,Michigan called the 'Shnitzelbank' or something akin to that, where the atmosphere was truly german(steins all over the place,etc.)and the prime rib,which had to weigh in at 2lbs+, was an absolute sensation....anyone know of this place?
essvee
Cheeseburger
RE: Prime Rib 2003/10/05 12:36:27
This might be a tad off-topic but I have grilled an 8-rib prime rib a few times and it is so voluptuous. Black and smoky-charred on the outside, brilliant pink-red and juicy on the inside. Truly the best of both worlds.
RibDog
Double Cheeseburger
RE: Prime Rib 2003/10/05 17:05:43
I agree with you Essvee. During the holidays, I always cook a standing rib roast in my smoker. It is absolutely to die for, if I do say so myself. Everyone I serve it to just loves it.

John
mayor al
Fire Safety Admin
RE: Prime Rib 2003/10/05 17:51:15
This probably belongs on a "Pet Peeve" thread, but it fits here too. I am tired of every restaurant bragging on a "Great Ribeye Steak". it seems that most of the those Ribeyes are not Ribeye, but the whole Rib Steak including a large piece fat and the 'cap' or top layer of less attractive and less tender beef. When done as a slice of the rib-roast It is a tasty addition...but when broiled as a steak it is NOT as attractive, and tasty/tender as the real rib "eye" is. Yet the price remains high. I consider the Ribeye lable to be false advertising on the part of the places who do mislead us poor consumers.
Michael Hoffman
Double-chop Porterhouse
RE: Prime Rib 2003/10/05 17:58:07
Originally posted by unclefudd

I may be wrong, but my 50-year-old memories of being an apprentice meatcutter seem to be telling me that the "prime" of prime rib has not to do with any USDA grading such as "Select" or "Choice", but rather the section of the beef side it was cut from, i.e., the "prime" or first cut of the rib section.

It certainly used to. I base that on my memories of working at my father's wholesale meat business. New Haven Packing Co. Purveyors to Hotels and Restaurants."
RibDog
Double Cheeseburger
RE: Prime Rib 2003/10/05 19:49:03
I stand corrected Uncle Fudd and Michael. I did a little hunting and found the following explanation of "prime rib" on the California Barbecue Association website.

It said:

Prime rib does not always mean "USDA prime grade"

Opinion by JOE O'CONNELL, cbbqa Past President
Posted November 30, 2001

There is a common belief that a "prime rib" refers to USDA prime-grade rib roast. This is a myth.

In beef, prime rib has long meant the best cut of the rib section. The rib section is cut from the 6th to the 12th ribs, inclusive. This means that the rib section does not include the 5th rib forward, which is part of the "chuck", and the 13th rib backwards, which is part of the "loin".

As described below, chefs like Ranhofer in 1894 used the term "Prime Rib" many years before the USDA first adopted a tentative meat grading system in 1916.

Ranhofer's reference
For example, Charles Ranhofer, the famous 19th Century chef de cuisine at Delmonico's Restaurant in Manhattan, explained the meaning of Prime Rib in his 1894 treatise, The Epicurean, at page 472. Ranhofer's illustration of the American beef cuts shows three cuts, labeled A, B and C (with C being the front-most), which are described:

Six Prime ribs, A [11th and 12th ribs] first cut, B [9th and 10th ribs] second cut, C [7th and 8th ribs] third cut. Id.

The 6th rib is also part of the rib section and can be used as a rib roast, but not a "Prime Rib".

USDA meat grading
The first tentative standards for grades of dressed beef were formulated in 1916, and the federal grading of beef began in 1927.

Conclusion
The term "Prime Rib" was in common use to mean the best part of the beef rib section, more than 25 years before the first use of the "Prime-Grade" designation by the USDA.

Related information
Harris, J.J., H.R. Cross, and J.W. Savell (Department of Animal Science, Texas A&M University). "History of Meat Grading in the United States". November 30, 2001.

This sure opened my eyes!

John
seafarer john
Filet Mignon
RE: Prime Rib 2003/10/05 21:28:30
Rib Dog et.al. : BBQers do not do Prime ribs - that would be one hell of a waste of great meat. So who cares what the California BBQ Association has to say on the subject. BBQrs might do a standing rib roast in their smokers and I'll bet it's great - but it would be one Hell of a waste to use "Prime" in that technique - a technique designed to tenderize less tender cuts of meat.

Delmonico's and chef Ranhofer are long gone and so is their definition of "Prime Ribs". Your history lesson is impressive, but it is just that - History. The modern definition, dating from about 1928 is that Prime Ribs are selected from the USDA graded beef - "Prime Grade". Ribdog was correct in his first statement , that anything other than "Prime" graded beef is a "standing rib roast" by modern definiotion.

I might also add that I am sure Delmonico's aged all their beef, and as long as it was of at least "choice" quality by modern definition the ageing gave the beef tenderness and great taste. If I could get aged
choice grade rib roast I'd no longer have to chase around trying to find
Prime for the Holidays. And, if any of you out there can give me explicit directions for safely ageing beef at home ( without investment in a walk-in meat locker with high tech temperature and humidity controls) I'd be most appreciative and would give it a try this winter.

RibDog
Double Cheeseburger
RE: Prime Rib 2003/10/05 22:12:12
Well, I think there is one you are not considering Seafarer. Just because I cook a ribroast in my smoker, whether it be prime or choice, I cook the roast at the same temps I would cook it in a kitchen oven. No low and slow for rib roasts. I cook mine at 350* until I hit internal temp of 118, take the roast and the water pan off of the smoker and run the vents wide open to get the smoker straight up to 450* and put the roast back on for a very quick outside sear. Finished internal temp will be 125 to 130. I do agree that no one should cook a rib roast at standard "smoke" temps. That would just be wasteful.

John
CheeseWit
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Prime Rib 2003/10/05 22:19:42
Mayor, I agree with you 100%. It's a pet peeve with me too. I laughed when I read your post. I was thinking about writing a similar post.
quote:
Originally posted by Al-The Mayor-Bowen

This probably belongs on a "Pet Peeve" thread, but it fits here too. I am tired of every restaurant bragging on a "Great Ribeye Steak". it seems that most of the those Ribeyes are not Ribeye, but the whole Rib Steak including a large piece fat and the 'cap' or top layer of less attractive and less tender beef. When done as a slice of the rib-roast It is a tasty addition...but when broiled as a steak it is NOT as attractive, and tasty/tender as the real rib "eye" is. Yet the price remains high. I consider the Ribeye lable to be false advertising on the part of the places who do mislead us poor consumers.
Hillbilly
Double Cheeseburger
RE: Prime Rib 2003/10/06 08:40:38
The best prime rib I ever had was at "SLUG'S RIB" on Independence Blvd in Charlotte, NC. Slug Claiborne opened up several other "Slug's" restaurants across town (including one on top of the First Union tower) with varied menus, but the first one on Independence at Albemarle served only fantastic prime rib.
mek
Cheeseburger
RE: Prime Rib 2003/10/06 10:26:35
When in Baltimore, go to The Prime Rib. I believe they opened in 1965. Consistently the best, despite the arrival of Ruth Chris, Morton's, Fleming's, etc.
seafarer john
Filet Mignon
RE: Prime Rib 2003/10/06 18:34:07
Ribdog: I bow to your superior technique on the smoker - your recipe sounds great, but i wont attempt it here in the Hudson Valley on December 24th when i am craving the warmth of the fireplace not the chill of the patio.
redtressed
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Prime Rib 2003/10/06 19:53:02
I positively hate going into the fancier chain places and see what they usually come with as "prime rib", most looks more like a slice of eye of round. My favorite place to indulge in prime rib is a place outside of Cumberland, Maryland on I-68 called JB's Steak Cellar, which lies under a family type place on top, Mason's Barn.
The Prime there is truly prime.....aged and all.....and you watch them cut your portion off a large spit. It ALWAYS fills your French White dinner plate and lops over the edges. And they KNOW it's sacrilege not to offer horseradish cream and Yorkshire Pudding by it's side. Another eccentricity of theirs I just love is the opening offering of crusty bread loaves surrounded by huge heads of roasted garlic......as spread instead of butter. The price is right there also...A 6 oz prime, with salad, 3 sides, bread runs about 7 dollars. They also offer the best of confections such as Beesting Cake, Rum Cake, cheesecakes from Philly, Mississippi Mud et al.
RibDog
Double Cheeseburger
RE: Prime Rib 2003/10/07 08:45:05
Seafarer: No reason to bow. I think we all know that there are always many different ways to cook a piece of meat. I just really like mine with the taste of hardwood charcoal and hickory every once in a while. If you ever want the full recipe, let me know and I will post it.

John
baybey
Junior Burger
RE: Prime Rib 2003/10/07 10:09:36
To reply to the initial post searching for a great prime rib place. The best to my mind is Kreis just west of St.Louis. They specialize in prime rib and serve up a humongous cut that is 2 ribs thick and almost looks like a cake (of meat) on the plate. Other diners turn and stare as it is brought through the dining room. An unforgetable meal
lleechef
Sirloin
RE: Prime Rib 2003/10/07 16:44:39
redtressed,
What is Beesting cake??? Sounds dangerous. " />
Oneiron339
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Prime Rib 2003/10/07 17:09:00
quote:
Originally posted by seafarer john

Rib Dog et.al. : BBQers do not do Prime ribs - that would be one hell of a waste of great meat. So who cares what the California BBQ Association has to say on the subject. BBQrs might do a standing rib roast in their smokers and I'll bet it's great - but it would be one Hell of a waste to use "Prime" in that technique - a technique designed to tenderize less tender cuts of meat.

Delmonico's and chef Ranhofer are long gone and so is their definition of "Prime Ribs". Your history lesson is impressive, but it is just that - History. The modern definition, dating from about 1928 is that Prime Ribs are selected from the USDA graded beef - "Prime Grade". Ribdog was correct in his first statement , that anything other than "Prime" graded beef is a "standing rib roast" by modern definiotion.

I might also add that I am sure Delmonico's aged all their beef, and as long as it was of at least "choice" quality by modern definition the ageing gave the beef tenderness and great taste. If I could get aged
choice grade rib roast I'd no longer have to chase around trying to find
Prime for the Holidays. And, if any of you out there can give me explicit directions for safely ageing beef at home ( without investment in a walk-in meat locker with high tech temperature and humidity controls) I'd be most appreciative and would give it a try this winter.


Seafarer Alton Brown did an aged beef standing rib roast show where he demonstrated how to age the roast in his frig in a plastic container. You may check the Food Channel.com for the exact details but it looked pretty easy.
seafarer john
Filet Mignon
RE: Prime Rib 2003/10/07 17:33:03
Thanks Ribdog, yes, I'd like the recipe, I'll pass it along to my son who is becomming a master at the smoker (Big Green Egg) and hope that sometime he'll do it for us.

And, thanks One Iron, I'll look into the alton Brown thing- he's quite a genius at improvising ways that really work well...
Rick F.
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Prime Rib 2003/10/07 18:12:33
quote:
Originally posted by seafarer john

I am not familiar with the widely advertised mail order sellers of Prime beef, does annyone out there have experinece with any of them?
I've shopped at[url='http://www.lobels.com']Lobel's[/url] and been very happy with the results. Their meat is dry-aged and never frozen. Their meat is also (sigh) very expensive.
redtressed
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Prime Rib 2003/10/07 19:10:29
Beesting cake is actually of German origin, original name being "Bienenstich" There are several variations of it including a rum one, Chocolate one etc, but the key ingredient in any Beesting Cake is honey. Here's a very good recipe for it found on ALLRECIPES.com that sticks to the original very well.


BeeSting Cake

Ingredients


2 (.25 ounce) packages active dry yeast
1/4 cup warm water
3/4 cup unsalted butter, softened
3/4 cup white sugar
2 eggs, room temperature
3 egg yolks
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup warm milk
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
1/2 cup sour cream, room temperature
4 cups all-purpose flour
2 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted

2/3 cup packed light brown sugar
6 tablespoons unsalted butter
3/8 cup heavy whipping cream
3/8 cup honey
1/4 cup lemon juice
5/8 cup sliced almonds

2 cups pastry cream


Directions
1 Combine the yeast, and the warm water; set aside to proof for 5 minutes.
2 Cream 3/4 cup butter and sugar until light. Beat in the eggs and yolks one at a time. Add the vanilla, milk, sour cream, and yeast. Beat until smooth. Add the flour a little at a time to form a soft dough. Add all of the flour, and continue to beat until elastic, about 8 minutes. Place dough into an oiled bowl, cover and place in a warm spot until doubled in size, about 50 minutes. Can be placed in the refrigerator overnight instead.
3 Beat down the dough, and divide into two pieces. Place each in a buttered 9 inch square pan. Brush the top of each with 1 tablespoon of the melted butter. Cover and let rise until doubled.
4 For the glaze, place the brown sugar, 6 tablespoons butter, cream, and honey in a saucepan over medium heat. Bring to a boil, and stir until the sugar dissolves. Boil for 30 seconds. Remove from heat; add the lemon juice and almonds. Let cool slightly. Drizzle the warm glaze, not hot, over each of the cakes.
5 Bake at 375 degrees F (190 degrees C) for 30 minutes, or until the nuts are golden. Cool on a rack.
6 Split the cakes lengthwise using a serrated knife, and fill with the pastry cream. Sandwich cakes back together and serve.

Pastry Cream:

Ingredients


1 cup milk
3 egg yolks
1/2 cup white sugar
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
1 tablespoon butter
1 tablespoon vanilla extract


Directions
1 In a small saucepan, Heat milk to boiling point and remove from the heat.
2 In a heatproof mixing bowl, beat egg yolks until smooth. Gradually add the granulated sugar and continue beating until pale yellow. Beat in the flour.
3 Pour the hot milk into the egg yolk mixture in a steady stream, beating constantly. When all the milk has been added, place the bowl over (not in) a pan of boiling water, or pour the mixture into the top of a double boiler. Heat, stirring constantly, until thickened. Cook 2 minutes more, then remove from the heat. Stir in the butter and vanilla. Cover with plastic wrap and allow to cool.



Makes 8 servings


It's delicious, rich and as sinful as they come



RibDog
Double Cheeseburger
RE: Prime Rib 2003/10/07 22:13:40
Here you go Seafarer:

On the night before you want to cook the roast, take the roast and rub it down with Worchestshire. Then sprinkle fairly heavily with McCormick's Montreal Steak Seasoning. Wrap the roast in plastic wrap and pop it in the fridge for the night. The next day, take the roast out about three hours before you plan to pop it in the smoker and pack the two ends of the roast with finely ground rock salt or kosher salt. Put the roast back in the fridge. About one hour before cooking, take the roast out and leave on counter to warm up some. Put the roast in a smoker running anywhere from 275* to 325*. If you are shooting for medium rare, cook the roast until you reach an internal temp of 118*. If you can, use a Polder thermometer so you don't have to keep opening the smoker to check the roast. When it hits 118*, take it out and cover with foil. Then open all the vents on the smoker and run it up to 450-500 and pop the roast back in for five minutes. This will give you a little better carmelization on the outside. The roast is now ready to sliced and served.

BTW, when I cook a rib roast, I use lump charcoal in my smoker along with two to three chunks of hickory. Since your son is already using a BGE, he is use to lump.

Enjoy.

John
Oneiron339
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Prime Rib 2003/10/08 08:49:04
Hey, Rib... about how long (cooking time)for this smoked rib roast, say 4-6 lbs.?
seafarer john
Filet Mignon
RE: Prime Rib 2003/10/12 12:48:30
Our little Village of New Paltz has been blessed for the past 30 years with the best Italian Deli outside NYC, Toscani and Sons. Recently they have expanded and opened a butcher shop as part of the Deli and therein lies the really good news. The butcher has solved my problem of trying to find prime beef and especially aged prime beef. He stocks it all the time. We had a beautiful inch-and-a-half porterhouse ($12 / lb) for dinner last night and are looking foreward to an aged rib roast for the Holidays. We just hope he will get the support he needs from our community to continue to carry such a luxury item all the time.
spadoman
Cheeseburger
RE: Prime Rib 2003/10/12 18:26:03
When I worked as a cook in a resort up-north in Minnesota, we made grilled prime rib steaks. We used a restaurant cut lip on prime rib and cut about one inch thick steaks.
I put these in a marinade for at least one day, two is better.
The marinade was made with soy sauce, worchestershire sauce and garlic powder, cut with a little water.
Then just grilled on a very hot charcoal fired grill, searing the juices in.
These were a marvelous way to cook prime rib. We did this a lot in Winter and the aroma of the charcoal fired grill in the cold cleab northern air permeated the area, especially when the barometer was in a high perssure mode.
Makes me think I'd like to get that job back. maybe the Hungry Jack lodge in Grand marais, MN needs a backup cook for the snowmobilers this winter.
RibDog
Double Cheeseburger
RE: Prime Rib 2003/10/12 22:16:27
Sorry OneIron, I was gone at a BBQ contest and had not seen your question. If you are cooking at 275 - 300, I would roughly say 1 1/2 to two hours. But internal temp is the best way to tell it is done. I use a Polder cooking theremometer; one that has the thermometer on a wire. This way you can watch the internal temp without having to open the cooker until it reaches temp.

John
berndog
Double Cheeseburger
RE: Prime Rib 2003/10/13 00:10:07
Many restaurants serve a passable prime rib, but one of the best I have had is at the Conesus Inn near Lakeville, NY. I once dined at a Lawry's in Los Angeles whch claimed to serve the best prime rib in the world. it was OK, but the four of us all agreed it didn't compare to Conesus Inn.
Wachusettgrad61
Junior Burger
RE: Prime Rib 2003/10/13 19:23:55
Holey Moley, all this talk of Prime Rib and roasted garlic has me about ready to spaz out. One of the best Prime Ribs I have eaten lately was from our local Elks Club...thick, very tender and oh so delicious. I once had a grilled PR at a restaurant in Tampa that was to die for, but haven't found anywhere else that does that.
I will be testing the PR waters at a local restaurant in Columbia Tn in a few weeks that boast of fabo PR...we shall see.

WG61
Argent
Cheeseburger
RE: Prime Rib 2003/10/14 07:33:21
Anyone tried a Salt crusted Prime Rib. I have seen Recipe For it. and have done other salt crusted dishes, Mainly fish,[Whole Salmon fillets]with geat results,
I have been wanting to try it with a standing rib
Spudnut
Double Cheeseburger
RE: Prime Rib 2003/10/14 07:40:05
quote:
Originally posted by Argent

Anyone tried a Salt crusted Prime Rib. I have seen Recipe For it. and have done other salt crusted dishes, Mainly fish,[Whole Salmon fillets]with geat results,
I have been wanting to try it with a standing rib



Not a salt-crusted prime rib, but I have had salt-crusted steak (which is a popular preparation among Brazilians and, I assume, others.) A Brazilian friend introduced me to it. Too salty for my personal taste, but there was no doubt that it added a tremendous flavor to the meat. Friends who didn't mind the salt level loved it.
rbpalmer
Cheeseburger
RE: Prime Rib 2003/10/14 10:51:17
quote:
Originally posted by mek

When in Baltimore, go to The Prime Rib. I believe they opened in 1965. Consistently the best, despite the arrival of Ruth Chris, Morton's, Fleming's, etc.


They also have a location in Washington, D.C., which is great, too. I was there two weeks ago and enjoyed a tremendous bone-in ribeye steak. Ate salad for the rest of the week to compensate for it, and it was worth it!
tamandmik
Double Cheeseburger
RE: Prime Rib 2003/10/14 12:36:51
Has anyone ever been to Durgin Park in Boston? I was there once, and the Prime Rib I ordered was memorable. It overhung both sides of the plate. I barely had the appetite to finish it. It stands as my favorite prime rib ever.
UncleVic
Sirloin
RE: Prime Rib 2003/10/14 15:04:56
Gary, place still exists!

Schnitzelbank Restaurant
342 Jefferson SE, Grand Rapids 49503 (616) 459-9527
www.schnitzelbankgr.com

quote:
Originally posted by garykg6

there used to be a place in Grand Rapids,Michigan called the 'Shnitzelbank' or something akin to that, where the atmosphere was truly german(steins all over the place,etc.)and the prime rib,which had to weigh in at 2lbs+, was an absolute sensation....anyone know of this place?
2005Equinox
Cheeseburger
RE: Prime Rib 2003/10/27 01:50:47
We have a few local restauraunts that serve Prime Rib. My favorite is B.J Clancys a locally owned place in Menasha Wisconsin. If you want to make it yourself we can get it at Haens Meats our local meat market in Kaukauna. We heard them explaining to someone how to cook it and it sounded really good!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
flowercat
Junior Burger
RE: Prime Rib 2003/10/27 15:58:50
The best Prime Rib that I've ever eaten was at the Rib Room located in the Omni Royal Orleans Hotel in the heart of the French Quarter. The Prime Rib is so tender that you can cut it with a fork, the Steak Au Poivre is the best that I've ever eaten, their "specials" whether fish, beef or fowl are always excellent. I also have to rave about their perfect oysters-en-brochette and don't want to think about their desserts or I'll start to drool ..
The-Porcus
Junior Burger
RE: Prime Rib 2003/11/22 18:35:53
quote:
Originally posted by tamandmik

Has anyone ever been to Durgin Park in Boston? I was there once, and the Prime Rib I ordered was memorable. It overhung both sides of the plate. I barely had the appetite to finish it. It stands as my favorite prime rib ever.


Yesirree bob and I certainly rank it high. I consumed everything but the bone and got "food drunk" and entered a food fight with my dinner companion - well, I just tossed the bone at him. Can there be a higher commendation for a restaurant's quality than to induce such mirth?
Theedge
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Prime Rib 2003/11/23 10:02:06
My prime rib recipe:

Poke holes in the prime rib. Soak it in worcestershire and lawreys salt over night. Pre Heat oven to 375. Place in oven uncovered. After one hour turn oven off (don't open the door)and let sit 2-7 hours. Heat oven to 375 again for 35-40 min.

I have found that for 4.5 pound piece of meat the off time for the oven should be 4 hours and 45 minutes.

The biggest thing is never ever ever open the oven door. Letting that heat out even once won't work. I made the mistake of leaving in my pizza stone once as well, it held the heat and overcooked the meat.
Theedge
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Prime Rib 2003/11/23 10:08:15
Oh, almost forgot. The cut I get is what the butcher sells as ribeye. I just have him cut off a roast size piece before he makes the steaks. Some cuts are better than others. All I know is people keep asking me to make. Good times, good times.
Messmore
Junior Burger
RE: Prime Rib 2004/01/07 14:41:44
NE1 ever tried salt crusted standing prime rib roast? U can use any roast.
Here is my recipe for Salt Crusted Prime Rib, It turns out great.

Salt Crusted Prime Rib

Ingredients

1 Prime rib roast
Rock salt/ice cream rock salt
1 ts Monosodium glutamate (MSG) <Optional>
2 tb Worcestershire sauce
1 ts Paprika
Salt and pepper to taste

Instructions

Mix MSG, worcestershire, paprika, salt and pepper and rub into meat. Completely cover the bottom of a heavy roasting pan with a layer of rock salt. Lightly dampen the salt with water until salt is just moist. Place roast on the salt in standing position. Cover the roast completely with more salt, then dampen lightly. Roast in preheated oven at 500 degrees for 12-15 minutes per pound. When done, rock salt will be extremely hard. Crack it, pull away from meat and brush any remaining salt particles from roast.

http://www.yummmy.com
saps
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Prime Rib 2004/01/07 15:34:36
I generally don't like prime rib, but my wife ordered the Wagyu (Kobe) Prime Rib at Gibson's Steak House in Chicago, and it was phenomenal. It was about a 2.25 inch slab of meat, easily enough for two, cooked rare in the center and crusted on the outside.

John
L&R
Junior Burger
RE: Prime Rib 2004/02/04 10:17:03
I think the Texas Roadhouse up here in MA has the Besat Prime Rib. It's always juicy and not too fatty like some other places.

After eating there I will never got back to the Outback.

Longhorns Steakhouse is pretty good too, but sometimes there are too many spices for me on it.
I have gone to some more expensive resaunts and ordered primerib and it is never as good as the Texas Roadhouse.
L&R
Junior Burger
RE: Prime Rib 2004/02/04 10:42:48
I think the Texas Roadhouse up here in MA has the Besat Prime Rib. It's always juicy and not too fatty like some other places.

After eating there I will never got back to the Outback.

Longhorns Steakhouse is pretty good too, but sometimes there are too many spices for me on it.
I have gone to some more expensive resaunts and ordered primerib and it is never as good as the Texas Roadhouse.
anselmo1
Cheeseburger
RE: Prime Rib 2004/02/06 04:54:26
Without a doubt, the best prime rib on the planet earth is the Landmark Red Osier Restaurant in Stafford, NY. Here is their site:
http://www.redosier.com/

Bulldozer Rectangle
Cheeseburger
RE: Prime Rib 2004/02/06 23:30:45
Gotta agree on the Durgin Park recommendation. That might be the best prime rib I've ever had.

Best investment I ever made was $20 in a digital probe thermometer, one that connects with a base unit that sits outside the oven. Set the temp for medium rare +10 degrees for carryover (~122) and the thing goes off when it's done. No opening and closing the oven, and you can watch the temp rise.

Not sure I agree with all these spice concoctions for prime rib, especially the MSG one, which makes my limbs feel numb due to an allergic reaction. But I haven't tried, so I won't judge.

Best thing I've found is to age the beef for a good 4 days in a container in the fridge, and let the water drain from the beef. Less water = more concentrated beef flavor. Yummy.

My standing rib roast was pretty good for X-mas, but the Au Jus was a disaster. Anyone got any recommendations?
Bluemaxx
Cheeseburger
RE: Prime Rib 2004/05/10 00:27:28
C'mon down to central Florida and I will gladly introduce you to the best Prime Rib I have ever eaten anywhere! Towns like Sebring, Okeechobee and Indiantown have restaurants with some of the best cuts available anywhere. Simply awesome!!

Rich
[url]www.BluemaxxRacing.com[/url]
rbpalmer
Cheeseburger
RE: Prime Rib 2004/05/10 08:28:28
quote:
Originally posted by mek

When in Baltimore, go to The Prime Rib. I believe they opened in 1965. Consistently the best, despite the arrival of Ruth Chris, Morton's, Fleming's, etc.


They also have a branch in Washington DC, which has the best prime rib I've had in this area. Their $20 prime rib lunch is, IMHO, one of the best fine dining bargains in DC.
steaklover
Hamburger
RE: Prime Rib 2004/07/29 02:31:05
quote:
Originally posted by RibDog

I stand corrected Uncle Fudd and Michael. I did a little hunting and found the following explanation of "prime rib" on the California Barbecue Association website.

It said:

Prime rib does not always mean "USDA prime grade"

Opinion by JOE O'CONNELL, cbbqa Past President
Posted November 30, 2001

There is a common belief that a "prime rib" refers to USDA prime-grade rib roast. This is a myth.

In beef, prime rib has long meant the best cut of the rib section. The rib section is cut from the 6th to the 12th ribs, inclusive. This means that the rib section does not include the 5th rib forward, which is part of the "chuck", and the 13th rib backwards, which is part of the "loin".

As described below, chefs like Ranhofer in 1894 used the term "Prime Rib" many years before the USDA first adopted a tentative meat grading system in 1916.

Ranhofer's reference
For example, Charles Ranhofer, the famous 19th Century chef de cuisine at Delmonico's Restaurant in Manhattan, explained the meaning of Prime Rib in his 1894 treatise, The Epicurean, at page 472. Ranhofer's illustration of the American beef cuts shows three cuts, labeled A, B and C (with C being the front-most), which are described:

Six Prime ribs, A [11th and 12th ribs] first cut, B [9th and 10th ribs] second cut, C [7th and 8th ribs] third cut. Id.

The 6th rib is also part of the rib section and can be used as a rib roast, but not a "Prime Rib".

USDA meat grading
The first tentative standards for grades of dressed beef were formulated in 1916, and the federal grading of beef began in 1927.

Conclusion
The term "Prime Rib" was in common use to mean the best part of the beef rib section, more than 25 years before the first use of the "Prime-Grade" designation by the USDA.

Related information
Harris, J.J., H.R. Cross, and J.W. Savell (Department of Animal Science, Texas A&M University). "History of Meat Grading in the United States". November 30, 2001.

This sure opened my eyes!

John



I'm disappointed. I just assumed that "prime" meant USDA prime grade.
I recently posted a message on another board insisting that a stated grade of prime meant exactly that.

Man, was I embaressed.

I buy my meat at a local butcher shop that calls its steaks and roasts prime, and because it's better than anything available locally, I never questioned it. Their's is always fresh, never frozen, good price, better marbeled than anything labeled as "choice" anywhere else. I now won't buy meat anywhere else.

Many supermarkets in this area are now calling "select grade" meat "certifed" or "selected" and charging premium prices. To me it's barely edible, and sticking fancy labels on it without stating the USDA grade is misleading. I thought this was illegal, and I've complained about it to meat managers. I usually get a blank stare and a shrug of the shoulders.

I admit to being naive, but I remember just a few years ago all meat was labeled with its USDA grade.

Is this the way it is all over the country? Was grade labeling always voluntary, or did something change?

Edwaste
Cheeseburger
RE: Prime Rib 2004/07/29 13:08:04
I used to attend a company banquet every year that always offered Prime Rib. To me it was a juicey, tender hunk of undercooked beef, sitting in what looked like a puddle of blood that had no taste at all, begging for tabasco. While everyone else seemed to love it, I considered bringing in a propane torch to finish off the bloody thing, that was barely cooked within food safety margins. I felt like some predator eating something I just captured, and it was still mooing as I stuck a fork into it.
Then I was learned to ask for the "end cut". Sometimes I had to beg, bribe, or threaten the waiters to get one. Ahhh, Crispy, tasty charred crust surrounding perfectly cooked meat. Yum.
jbburn
Junior Burger
RE: Prime Rib 2004/07/29 13:39:12
skips other place in new buffalo ,michigan fact period amen!
eaglerich
Junior Burger
RE: Prime Rib 2004/07/29 14:14:39
Steaklover, our local grocery chains recently started labeling their beef that way. Vons calls theirs " Rancher's Reserve " and Albertsons calls theirs "Blue Ribbon ". I know this beef is USDA Select grade beef. While these stores aren't charging a premium, they are still misleading their customers. I miss Raleys because they sold only Choice grade beef. I buy all my beef from Costco, which is also USDA Choice.
steaklover
Hamburger
RE: Prime Rib 2004/07/29 19:33:11
eaglerich, I didn't know about Costco only selling choice beef. I'll have to check it out. I'm a member of BJ's which has pretty good meat, but also sells some select cuts. They're mixed in with the choice cuts. You have to read the fine print on the labels very carefully.

I think I'll check out Costco when my BJ's renewal comes up.

There's a couple of places in this area which stick impressive silver foil labels on their meats which look the same, but one will say "choice" and the other won't state a grade. Since their sale items change weekly, you have to check the labels carefully to see which is the better buy. Sometimes you may find choice beef selling for 50 cents less a pound than select, which, IMHO, is one step above dog food.
MikeS.
Fire Safety Admin
RE: Prime Rib 2004/11/23 01:46:28
Well I too think that the charcoal grill is the way to cook a rib roast or a hunk of tenderloin. I like to buy my rib roasts and tenderloins from Costco. This time of year they offer bone in roast, which makes for a better presentation.

I like to cook mine at ~350 until the internal temp hits 140. I use the Polder type thermometer so that there is no guessing about doneness. I use an indirect fire with 2 good sized hunks of well soaked hickory. I season the meat with salt, pepper and garlic powder.

Man the meat comes out sooo good you want to smack your Momma! But Don't!

MikeS.
tmiles
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Prime Rib 2004/11/23 12:36:55
A defunct local steakhouse chain used to have a small butcher shop out front. The prices were high, and I never bought. All the beef was prime. I think, but don't know, that much of the beef being served in mid scale restaurants today is no better than what you can buy at your local supermarket.I got an education 10 years ago, when random seating on a cruise made the CEO/partner of one of the best packing companies my dinner companion for 3 nights. At the time, his company was the largest supplier of beef to cruise ships. He was of the opinion that the public would not pay retail the cost that he wholesaled his product for, but as he said, "You get what you pay for"
Mosca
Filet Mignon
RE: Prime Rib 2004/11/23 13:58:25
Wegman's groceries here in the northeast carry top choice meats that are truly excellent, but nevertheless no match for the true "prime" rib that I've had in the better steakhouses.

This year I'm getting the Christmas roast at either Peter Luger's or Lobel's, I'm not sure which.

The real drag is that some of us like it rare, some medium, and some won't touch it id there's any pink at all, so I have to cook to rare and then broil individual servings.


Tom
Biggerguy
Junior Burger
RE: Prime Rib 2004/11/24 11:47:02
Love to talk Prime Rib! Best in Chicago & Vegas...Lawry's, Best in Baltimore...The Prime Rib, Best in Detroit...The Fox & Hounds (Best I've had), Best in Toledo...Mancy's. Be sure it's bone-in, or don't bother.
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