Gyro

Page: 12 > Showing page 1 of 2
Post
BillyCheesesteak
Junior Burger
2004/02/25 22:35:18
I have had great Gyro's in Chicago and believe it or not in Columbus, Ohio. Where can I find one in the Philadelphia area?
arianej
Cheeseburger
RE: Gyro 2004/02/28 00:08:42
Can't help you with Philadelphia, but I'd be interested to hear where you had good gyros in Columbus. :)

Best I've had to date were in Bloomington, IN, at King Gyros on Walnut. The place sure doesn't look impressive, but the gyros were far better (and cheaper) than what you could get downtown at the Trojan Horse.

Ariane
Rapunzll
Cheeseburger
RE: Gyro 2004/02/29 10:26:57
This doesn't answer your question about Philadelphia, but Greektown in Detroit is a great place to go for Greek food and it's fun!
Michael Hoffman
Double-chop Porterhouse
RE: Gyro 2004/02/29 10:36:28
quote:
Originally posted by arianej

Can't help you with Philadelphia, but I'd be interested to hear where you had good gyros in Columbus. :)

Best I've had to date were in Bloomington, IN, at King Gyros on Walnut. The place sure doesn't look impressive, but the gyros were far better (and cheaper) than what you could get downtown at the Trojan Horse.

Ariane


King Gyros on Hamilton Road, just north of Broad. Another gyro place on Hamilton Road in Gahanna. There are a couple more around the area, too.
meowzart
Double Cheeseburger
RE: Gyro 2004/03/01 15:23:12
In my research (and I've done lots, becuase gryos are just the most addicting sandwich on the face of the planet!) the best gyros (and soulvaki) to be had are at Greek Orthodox Church/Food festivals. I am sure there have to be some in the Philly area--always good to check the weekend papers that list when church services are. They usually list when the churches are having fundraisers and festivals, too. You won't be disappointed!
scbuzz
Double Cheeseburger
RE: Gyro 2004/03/01 15:41:17
I second that. We have one at the Greek Orthodox church here in Columbia SC each year and the food is almost the best I have ever tasted !! (I lived in greece for 3 months !!)

howard8
Cheeseburger
RE: Gyro 2004/03/02 08:43:52
I love Gyros. I've wondered. What is the correct pronunciation for this tasty concoction. Is it Giro, Gee-ro, Hee- ro or what?
Michael Hoffman
Double-chop Porterhouse
RE: Gyro 2004/03/02 09:24:38
quote:
Originally posted by howard8

I love Gyros. I've wondered. What is the correct pronunciation for this tasty concoction. Is it Giro, Gee-ro, Hee- ro or what?

YEER-oh
Cakes
Double Cheeseburger
RE: Gyro 2004/03/02 09:35:19
There is a good roadfood place in south Manatee county, FL. The Crazy Greek's. Corner of Whifield and 15 Street East aka old 301. I can't comment on how good their Gyros are as it is the only place I have had them. Taste good to me.

Good Greek salad. Good burgers and great fries. The fries are cut fairly small and cooked in peanut oil.

Cakes
Lucky Bishop
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Gyro 2004/03/02 14:13:47
Technically, the proper pronunciation is "YEE-rozh." That last sound sounds kinda like the first syllable of "ocean."
TJ Jackson
Filet Mignon
RE: Gyro 2004/03/02 14:20:59
Best Gyros (pronounced any way you like) in Cincinnati are also to be had at the big Greek Orthdox church festival, called Panegyri. There is a good greek presence in the restaurant busness here in Cincinnati - most of the ownership of the famous Cincinnati chili chains is greek. On the other hand, there is no 'upscale' greek dining I am aware of.
Michael Hoffman
Double-chop Porterhouse
RE: Gyro 2004/03/02 15:06:27
quote:
Originally posted by Lucky Bishop

Technically, the proper pronunciation is "YEE-rozh." That last sound sounds kinda like the first syllable of "ocean."


You're right.
IansMom
Cheeseburger
RE: Gyro 2004/03/02 15:13:04
Best place to get Gyros here in Louisville at the the Big greek Fest held now at the waterfront looking over the Ohio River.. everything is awesome there
buggsy
Junior Burger
RE: Gyro 2004/03/03 01:35:57
Gyros are not difficult to find in the Philadelphia area. "Kronos" is a company that supplies the gyro meat and associated ingredients for gyros to wholesalers. They are excellent at marketing and have suceeded in introducing gyros to the menus of many diners, pizza joints, and sandwich shops throughout the Delaware valley.
Personally, I prefer the gyro meat carved from the spinning "cone" that you will find at Greek restaurants in the area. The places that use the Kronos marketing posters typically use a frozen, sliced product that they reheat on the grill. Understand that although the person who sells you a gyro will swear up and down that the meat is lamb that there is NO WAY that one of those cones ever resembled a sheep, much less a small, tender one. Anyway, I'm sorry. If you want a gyro right away go to any mall food court in the counties, down to South Street or over to the Reading terminal market. Gyros rule!
emsmom
Double Cheeseburger
RE: Gyro 2004/04/16 12:33:37
There is a place right in the middle of the action ( Pavilion Area) at Myrtle Beach called Abrahams right on the ocean front. It is run by a man from Greece. He serves some of the best Gyros (he pronounces them YEE-rohs) that I have ever eaten with the best cucumber sauce. He also has potatoes that his sister makes that are like fried potatoes with some wonderful seasonings. Also, for a change, if you want a good foot long hot dog, his are the best.
hatteras04
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Gyro 2004/04/16 13:21:16
In Columbus, OH the best gyros used to be available on campus at the Souvlaki Palace II on Hight St. But since the idiot organization known as Campus Partners tore it down in the name of %&*#!#* progress and put up a Steak and Shake, the guy who ran the place moved down the street to be part of Buckeye Donuts. I have not tried them in this location but I assume they are still very good. There were many nights that I stumbled up there after spending a few hours at Street Scene (which is now a Chipotle's - thanks again Campus Partners) and had a jumbo gyro, great crinkle cut fries and a coke. Ahh the days of grad school.

I also recently discovered a great place for them up on the Northeast side at Cleveland Ave and 270 called Yanni's. Great little hole in the wall the serves many greek specialties along with other subs and burgers. Some of the best Saganaki I've had in a long time even though they don't flame it at your table like most places do.
Michael Hoffman
Double-chop Porterhouse
RE: Gyro 2004/04/16 15:15:19
Of course, you could always get your gyros from the cart in front of University Hospitals during the lunch hour.

Now, the original Souvlaki Palace on East Broad, right near High Street downtown, was really terific. Ah, but that's been gone a long time.
hatteras04
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Gyro 2004/04/16 15:42:21
quote:
Originally posted by Michael Hoffman

Of course, you could always get your gyros from the cart in front of University Hospitals during the lunch hour.

Now, the original Souvlaki Palace on East Broad, right near High Street downtown, was really terific. Ah, but that's been gone a long time.

Oh and I have. That's where I work. I thought about going today but with the nice weather the line was insanely long.
Michael Hoffman
Double-chop Porterhouse
RE: Gyro 2004/04/16 15:55:14
quote:
Originally posted by hatteras04

quote:
Originally posted by Michael Hoffman

Of course, you could always get your gyros from the cart in front of University Hospitals during the lunch hour.

Now, the original Souvlaki Palace on East Broad, right near High Street downtown, was really terific. Ah, but that's been gone a long time.

Oh and I have. That's where I work. I thought about going today but with the nice weather the line was insanely long.

My wife worked in the OR there for years. I've had many a gyro fromn that cart.
carlton pierre
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Gyro 2004/10/14 19:56:51
IMO best in Knoxville is on Kingston Pike, the Time Out Deli. Owner is from Jordan or Lebanon I don't remember which but they are really good.


Miami Subs, fast food chain, sells them. Anyone have opinions about them?

carl reitz
cwills
Junior Burger
RE: Gyro 2004/11/12 13:36:44
I live in NYC and my favorite gyro place is Gyro II (which, this being multitasking NYC, also has pizza, chicken, burgers, chinese food, etc., but I've never tried their non-gyro offerings). The difference is the sauce. Instead of the standard tart and tangy white sauce, Gyro II's sauce is slightly sweet. It tastes like it's made with Miracle Whip; maybe it is. Purists may shudder but it works for me. The standard gyro is fine but I prefer the platter, which comes with chunks of feta and olives and a couple of pitas. That way you can make your own mini-gyros with feta, dunk them in the drizzle of sauce, and cleanse your palate with the olives before making the next one.
cwills
Junior Burger
RE: Gyro 2004/11/12 13:39:20
I forgot to mention Gyro II's location. It's on Seventh Avenue right next to Penn Station/MSG--forget the actual street but it's like 35th, 36th. You can't miss it.
Tommy2dogs
Cheeseburger
RE: Gyro 2004/11/12 19:07:03
quote:
Originally posted by buggsy

Gyros are not difficult to find in the Philadelphia area. "Kronos" is a company that supplies the gyro meat and associated ingredients for gyros to wholesalers. They are excellent at marketing and have suceeded in introducing gyros to the menus of many diners, pizza joints, and sandwich shops throughout the Delaware valley.
Personally, I prefer the gyro meat carved from the spinning "cone" that you will find at Greek restaurants in the area. The places that use the Kronos marketing posters typically use a frozen, sliced product that they reheat on the grill. Understand that although the person who sells you a gyro will swear up and down that the meat is lamb that there is NO WAY that one of those cones ever resembled a sheep, much less a small, tender one. Anyway, I'm sorry. If you want a gyro right away go to any mall food court in the counties, down to South Street or over to the Reading terminal market. Gyros rule!


Actually Gyros is a highly seasoned combination of ground Beef and Lamb that is formed into a cone and frozen
danimal15
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Gyro 2004/12/06 16:38:57
Here in Chicago, we've always pronounced it "Gyros - with a hard "g" as in Google. Maybe we're wrong, though.
Tommy2dogs
Cheeseburger
RE: Gyro 2004/12/06 20:08:35
quote:
Originally posted by danimal15

Here in Chicago, we've always pronounced it "Gyros - with a hard "g" as in Google. Maybe we're wrong, though.


What part of Chicago is that?
danimal15
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Gyro 2004/12/07 15:11:39
I'm from the North Side, near Wrigley Field. There used to be about five storefront gyros restaurants on Broadway Ave. over there, but most are gone now.

It's possible I've been pronouncing it wrong all these years, of course.
Top
Cheeseburger
RE: Gyro 2004/12/07 15:40:12
Gyros II next to Penn Station has been there forever as well. I used to stop by in the early/mid '70s. Also my gyros benchmark.
Top
danimal15
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Gyro 2004/12/08 11:24:32
The best gyros in Chicago used to be served at a tiny storefront restaurant on the west side of North Broadway Ave. between Briar and Barry called simply "Gyros on a Spit." The owner was from Greece and spoke very little English, but was a jolly fellow, and he worked behind the counter with his wife and two teen-age kids. The gyros they served was unlike any I've had before or since - it had a wonderful crunchiness on the outside, and was moist, tender and flavorful inside. And the pita bread also was a notch above the rest. The counter-person would dip it in egg and then fry it in a little pan. It came out very flavorful and had a melt-in-your mouth texture -much better than just a piece of bread out of a plastic bag. I used to eat the gyros first with a fork, and save the pita for dessert, it was so good by itself. Also, the place had a wonderful Greek chicken dish - there were always whole roasted chickens on display. Unfortunately, with no warning, the restaurant just closed for good one day in the mid- to late-1990's. I never understood why. Maybe the rent got too high, or maybe the owner wanted to retire and his kids didn't want to take over. The space is now a flower shop, which the neighborhood certainly has enough of already.

Does anyone else remember this place? It had a blue sign outside.
Rapunzll
Cheeseburger
RE: Gyro 2004/12/08 12:24:31
If anyone ever makes it here to Traverse City, MI, there is a place here called Folgarelli's that sells gyro meat. I love that store, they always have something new and unusual.
But I second the mention of Greektown, and I also like Olga's Kitchen which is a Detroit based chain.
yumbo
Cheeseburger
RE: Gyro 2004/12/17 14:28:51
Are gyros an American invention? Or do they really eat gyros back in the homeland?

-Yumbo
Michael Hoffman
Double-chop Porterhouse
RE: Gyro 2004/12/17 14:49:48
quote:
Originally posted by yumbo

Are gyros an American invention? Or do they really eat gyros back in the homeland?

-Yumbo

I understand the gyro was invented by a Spartan warrior who had lost his left hand to an Athenian just before lunch. Being hungry, and with lunch hour almost over, he had the man at the kebab cart slip the lamb chunks off the skewer and into a piece of pita bread. "Could you put some of that tzatziki sauce on there," he asked, thus giving birth to the drippy gyro that we know and love today.
carlton pierre
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Gyro 2005/06/08 18:34:04
The number of ethnic eateries in south Florida is simply astonishing, but I had a great gyro today in Deerfield Beach at the Olympia Flame Diner, on Federal Hwy (US 1). Customer chose the restaurant and said he eats there frequently, always busy, excellent menu which included seafood as well.
Cornbread
Hamburger
RE: Gyro 2005/11/13 19:31:34
quote:
Originally posted by yumbo

Are gyros an American invention? Or do they really eat gyros back in the homeland?

-Yumbo
MilwFoodlovers
Filet Mignon
RE: Gyro 2005/11/13 20:36:12
In Milwaukee , the owners of all the shops I've gone to pronounced it YEE-rohs. Years back I went to Diana's Grocery in Greektown, ordered an YEE-rohs and the proprietor asked "You Grek?" I've never pronounced it differently since then.
Scorereader
Sirloin
RE: Gyro 2005/11/14 10:30:29
quote:
Originally posted by Cornbread

quote:
Originally posted by yumbo

Are gyros an American invention? Or do they really eat gyros back in the homeland?

-Yumbo



Gyros are an American version of a greek dish invented by greek fast food vendors in NYC.
But, if you go to Greece now, you can get Gyros.
porkbeaks
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Gyro 2005/11/14 12:51:59
From an article in the New York Times, September 4, 1971, "The Gyro, a Greek Sandwich, Selling Like Hot Dogs"
"A sandwich that is said to have originated 2,000 years ago is capturing the attention of Manhattan's quick eaters. The sandwich, a Greek gyro, pronounce "year-oh" is a lamb, tomato and onion concoction nestled in a fold of a soft bread called pita. More than 30 Greek snack stores selling the gyro have opened in Manhattan in the last year, according to the proprieter's estimates. In a heavily trafficked areas such as Times Square, three stores have opened in the last two months. Why has the Greek Gryo gained a prominent place in the fast food race? Store owners, patrons and native Greeks agree that the two major reasons are that the gyro is "different" and "delicious...The increase in the snack's popularity may be related to the large number of Americans who visit Greece and sample the local cuisine...The term gyro denotes a ring or circle and refers to the rotation of the meat as it is cooked. Greek historians attribute the origin of the dish to soldiers from the army of Alexander the great, who skewered their meat on long knives and cooked it by repeated turning over an open firet. Modern gyros are cooked on an electric rotisserie and are sold for prices ranging from 85 cents to $1...A Young Greek couple enjoying a gyro or "doner kebab" at the new Plaza de Athena on Broadway at 45th Street said they thought the food was "close to what it's like in Athens."

Also see:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gyros
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/D%C3%B6ner_kebap
Scorereader
Sirloin
RE: Gyro 2005/11/14 17:08:35
A quick check of my presumption found this:

http://www.foodtimeline.org/foodsandwiches.html

Gyros & doner kebabs

The history of gyros poses some unexpected questions. Certainly, the ingredients (lamb, pita bread, grilled vegetables, & seasonings) were known to Ancient peoples of the Middle East. Kebabs (roasted skewered meat) and other spiced meat minces have been sold by Middle Eastern and Greek street vendors for hundreds of years.

"...[one of the] the most highly regarded dishes of Baghdad [9th century AD]: judhaba (also called judhab)...Judhaba was basically roast meat; one thinks of shish kebabs....In the case of judhaba, the first thing to note is that the meat in question is not a skewer or kebab grilled over coals but something sliced off a large cut of meat roasted in a clay oven--an tannur (tandoor)--and then, as we have seen, minced fine. The sweet that accompanies it was actually the essence of the dish, the judhaba proper. It was a sort of sweetened Yorkshire pudding, stuck under the meat as it roasted to catch running fat and meat juices...The only surviving tenth-century cookbook, Kitab al-Tabikh, the contents of which date mostly from the ninth century, gives no fewer than nineteen recipes."
---"What to Order in Ninth-Century Baghdad," Charles Perry, Medieval Arab Cookery, Essays and tranlations by Mxime Rodinson, A.J. Arberry & Charles Perry [Prospect Books:Devon] 2001 (p. 220-1)

Gyros, as we know them today, presumably evolved from this tradition. Food historians generally agree the name "gyro" and the current product are both recent inventions, originating in the New York. According to the New York Times, modern gyros were very popular in the city during the early 1970s. They were marketed as fast food and embraced by diners looking for something different.

jeepguy
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Gyro 2005/11/14 18:32:03
It's Year-ose, but i think many like myself love the Tzatziki sauce the best. Would you like Tzatziki sauce with your Gyros? Yes, never without. And extra onion and tomato.
Cornbread
Hamburger
RE: Gyro 2005/11/19 23:07:17
quote:
Originally posted by yumbo

Are gyros an American invention? Or do they really eat gyros back in the homeland?

-Yumbo


Having lived in Athens (while working foodservice for the Olympic Games)I ate my wieght in Gyros. You can find gyros in just about any taverna in any sized town in Greece but you would be hard pressed to find one made with the "lamb loaf" type that americans are used to. As a matter of fact I never saw lamb..mostly Kotopoulo (chicken) and sausage with a wonderful yogurt mustard sauce. Some vendors even put french fries (fried in olive oil)in the flatbread is well.

Now I have to go and salavate......
hellsreach
Junior Burger
RE: Gyro 2006/06/15 13:30:07
quote:
Originally posted by yumbo

Are gyros an American invention? Or do they really eat gyros back in the homeland?

-Yumbo


Yes, having spend at least 6 weeks of my life in various islands of Greece, I can say without a doubt that they certainly do eat Gyro's in the "homeland". They are as common as pizza joints or hotdog vendors in our own cities. Gyro's are what you grab and go as you are roaming the streetside vendors selling plates, trinkets, and bad leather purses and jackets.

There are few differences that I noticed between the Grecian version and the American. The biggest difference I noticed was, while it is certainly common to have a side of fries come with your Gyro here in the States, it is actually more common than not that the Greek vendors put the fries INSIDE the Gyro across the pond. This is probably because, as stated above, gyros are moble food items. You are not, so much, meant to sit at a table and eat them.

To disagree with the previous poster, in the islands (I've never actually been to the mainland) the most common ingredient is certainly lamb. While they do sometimes have chicken and other options, I'd be comfortable in saying 100% of the gyro vendors in the places I've spent some time in, cut chunks of lamb off a spit to fill their gyros--just like the Americans do.
Scorereader
Sirloin
RE: Gyro 2006/06/15 13:52:33
Still, the "gyro" is basically an American "invention." Although, the ingredients were available to the Ancient Greeks.


Pat T Hat
Double Cheeseburger
RE: Gyro 2006/06/15 22:53:47
If your ever on the west side of Cincinnati check out Sebastians on Glenway Ave. Great friendly family who have been doing them right for thirty years!
caratzas
Cheeseburger
RE: Gyro 2006/06/16 00:35:28
It's been over 15 years since I've been to Greece, but all the gyros I had over there were made from chunks of lamb* sliced from an array of strips arranged like a circular staircase around a skewer. The whole schmear revolves around a vertical axis in front of a grill, just like here in the U.S. If you've had a shawarma or doner** kebab that's what they're like. There's quite a bit of cross-pollenization between Greek, Near Eastern and Middle Eastern cuisine.

My research suggests the "gyro loaf" you find in the U.S. is an American invention, though it wouldn't surprise me if they've made it back to the old country by now.

----
*Well, supposedly lamb. For years there were questions about the provenance of the meat in the sandwiches (horse was frequently suggested as a possibility, as well as stray pets.) Many vendors' sanitation was questionable too. For a while it was so bad that Athens banned their sale from street carts.

**Not a "donair" -- that's a Canadian gyro, which typically uses the same kind of gyro loaf that you find in the U.S.
V960
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Gyro 2006/06/17 10:31:13
I built a charcoal gyro cooker many many years ago. I used a cheap rostissire motor under an old hubcap that had a attached spike that was to hold the meat. I used some fence (not galvanized) to hold the charcoal in a half moon shape.

I didn't use the ground meat recipes. Having had the layered meat method in Europe, I went that way. Same spices anyway.

But we could only use it at fairly big parties because you end up w/ a speciality meat in a fairly large quantity. I'm not even sure where this thing is located now. Last time we used it was for a Super Bowl party and we had half the meat left over. The ribs, chili, and bbq we all eaten completely...but twenty or so pounds of great gyro meat went into the freezer. Three months later...fifteen pounds of gyro meat goes to the pigs.

hankny
Junior Burger
RE: Gyro 2006/09/02 01:55:02
in new york city- take the d or q to brooklyn and get off at kings highway. a little turkish resturant on east 16 st ablock from the station. the best gyro's and dishes. greeks use procesed meat, the turks use alternate slices of beef and lamb on a vertical spit. way better. in columbus go to the mad greek
seafarer john
Filet Mignon
RE: Gyro 2006/09/02 12:07:01
It does'nt take much imagination to see how "Yee-ro, Year-ro, etc. could be easily corrupted to "Hero". Is it possible that that the name for the Greek sandwich somehow was adopted by Italians and applied to an entirely different concoction? How else did the "Submarine", "Sub", "Torpedo", "Wedge" become the "Hero" in some neighborhoods?

Cheers, John
Michael Hoffman
Double-chop Porterhouse
RE: Gyro 2006/09/02 13:07:31
If you could eat a whole sub sandwich you were a hero.
Ashphalt
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Gyro 2006/09/02 13:35:17
I fell for Gyros when I lived in NYC. They were cheap and plentiful. (And, oddly enough, at the time I found Gyro II to be unacceptable because they made their tzatziki with mayo instead of yogurt.) Most places served Kronos and had the upright rotisserie, occasionally I'd find a place in the outer Boroughs that made their own. The meat would be shaved off the turning spit, and then grilled to get a bit of crisp on the outside.

I was terribly disappointed when I moved back to Boston. Even at places that serve Kronos, it's just not the same. I guess it just has to do with the smaller volume. The meat is never as bright tasting, or as well prepared. Last place I knew (now gone) that served an excellent gyro made their own as a once-weekly special and cooked it in a loaf pan, then sliced and grilled to serve. We do, however, have several middle-eastern shops selling good doners which are somewhat different, but a good substitute.
Jaybomb
Junior Burger
RE: Gyro 2006/09/21 22:17:53
Yes, it is both lamb and beef. It is a wonderful, GLORIOUS meal/sandwich that is only complete with: lettuce, tomato, tzatziki sauce, feta cheese, and onions. I hear from my pharmacy manager who is currently in Greece NOW, that french fries are also common place IN THE SANDWICH. mmmmm

If any of you lucky folks know who Alton Brown is, you'll LOVE him right now. Why? The reason is simple.

Alton Brown can TELL YOU HOW TO MAKE GYROS AT HOME!!!!!!!

Yes, look it up. I've yet to try it, but I need to. I've been blessed with a Gyro King near me, and they're wonderful.

PS- If they don't crumble the feta on it for you ontop of the sauce and splay the whole Gyro out for you like a giant salad/sandwich... you're missing a part of the magic.
Scorereader
Sirloin
RE: Gyro 2006/09/22 10:25:56
being on a low carb diet, I've been resigned to eating a gyro salad, which is basically just a greek salad (olives, tomato, onion, feta, cukes, lettuce)with the gyro meat and tzatziki sauce. Which is fine with me, I miss the warm pita, but I'll grab one over Christmas when I fall off the low-carb wagon from Dec 24 through Jan 1.


curried bluebonnet
Cheeseburger
RE: Gyro 2007/01/20 15:34:24
Oh how I love gyros! And I've only had ones at the mall and such. Thanks Jay, for the tip on Alton Brown's at home version. I will take a gander and see what it is all about. Anyone remember the Seinfeld episode about gyros??? Love it.
porkbeaks
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Gyro 2007/01/20 16:28:20
quote:
Originally posted by curried bluebonnet

............ Anyone remember the Seinfeld episode about gyros??? Love it.


Mmmmmm, Gyros!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0pJimz7bfXI
edwmax
Double Chili Cheeseburger
RE: Gyro 2007/01/20 17:02:32
No, I don't believe gyros are an American invention. I eat Shawerma's when I was in Saudi Arabia. They were made with chicken, beef or lamb. They were roasted on a vertical spit (cone) and the meat was shaved off and served on pita bread. Man those things were good.

I've never eat a Greek style gyro. I can't find them here in south Georgia.
Sundancer7
Fire Safety Admin
RE: Gyro 2007/01/20 18:35:55
Gyros came on the scene as far as I am concerned in the early 70's in East Tennessee. I sure did enjoy them but it seems they have gone another direction??

Paul E. Smith
Knoxville, TN
Scorereader
Sirloin
RE: Gyro 2007/01/23 17:01:13
quote:
Originally posted by edwmax

No, I don't believe gyros are an American invention.

I've never eat a Greek style gyro. I can't find them here in south Georgia.


all the research regarding Gyros (as they are known) state that they were invented by a Greek-American street vendor in NYC.
certainly the ingredients and similar recipes were available to Greels, Turks and other middle eastern and mediterranian countries before the street vendor started selling them. But, the Gyro was created in the US.

I'll repost one source's information:

http://www.foodtimeline.org/foodsandwiches.html

Gyros & doner kebabs

The history of gyros poses some unexpected questions. Certainly, the ingredients (lamb, pita bread, grilled vegetables, & seasonings) were known to Ancient peoples of the Middle East. Kebabs (roasted skewered meat) and other spiced meat minces have been sold by Middle Eastern and Greek street vendors for hundreds of years.

"...[one of the] the most highly regarded dishes of Baghdad [9th century AD]: judhaba (also called judhab)...Judhaba was basically roast meat; one thinks of shish kebabs....In the case of judhaba, the first thing to note is that the meat in question is not a skewer or kebab grilled over coals but something sliced off a large cut of meat roasted in a clay oven--an tannur (tandoor)--and then, as we have seen, minced fine. The sweet that accompanies it was actually the essence of the dish, the judhaba proper. It was a sort of sweetened Yorkshire pudding, stuck under the meat as it roasted to catch running fat and meat juices...The only surviving tenth-century cookbook, Kitab al-Tabikh, the contents of which date mostly from the ninth century, gives no fewer than nineteen recipes."
---"What to Order in Ninth-Century Baghdad," Charles Perry, Medieval Arab Cookery, Essays and tranlations by Mxime Rodinson, A.J. Arberry & Charles Perry [Prospect Books:Devon] 2001 (p. 220-1)

Gyros, as we know them today, presumably evolved from this tradition. Food historians generally agree the name "gyro" and the current product are both recent inventions, originating in the New York. According to the New York Times, modern gyros were very popular in the city during the early 1970s. They were marketed as fast food and embraced by diners looking for something different.



Michael Hoffman
Double-chop Porterhouse
RE: Gyro 2007/01/23 17:07:54
As I recall, the very first gyro I ever had came from a place called Souvlaki Palace. It was located near the corner of Broad and High streets in downown Columbus, Ohio. That was in September or October of 1971.
buffetbuster
Porterhouse
RE: Gyro 2007/01/23 17:26:21
Mike & Tony's on the Southside of Pittsburgh has long been a local institution and is the best place to get a gyro in the city.
eggsactley
Cheeseburger
RE: Gyro 2007/02/04 11:02:49
Spartan 8th Ave./68th Street in Brooklyn. Great tomato salad to go with a gyro.
Gyro King
Junior Burger
RE: Gyro 2007/10/23 13:20:40
Gyros, as we know them in North America, were invented by Chris Tomaras. Obviously, similar dishes have been served far back in time throughout the Middle East and Mediterranean. But what Americans think of as gyros was invented in Chicago in the late 60s/early 70s. Mr. Tomaras invented the Kronomatic, the machine that cooks the meat on a spit. He was good friends with my father and I actually went with him to Leon's, a Chicago sausage manufacturer, where he had a discussion about how to serve gyros as a sandwich. This was in the early 70s. The man from Leon's suggested encasing the gyros like a sausage, an idea Chris quickly discarded. He originally served gyros on french bread at his bar, The Sports Corner on Addison and Sheffield. Then he had the idea to put them on pita. This is all factual. No legend or BS.
goodeatsfan
Junior Burger
RE: Gyro 2007/12/11 20:56:48
ive never had a good gyro since i got back from greece
Page: 12 > Showing page 1 of 2