Things Forgotten

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Post
DawnT
Double Chili Cheeseburger
2012/07/24 01:40:47
We've had several threads on items and phrases of the past. How about past institutions and services that have faded into history. Remember Fix-It shops? They used to be everywhere. Sort of a handyman shop that you brought just about anything to see if it could be fixed or patched instead of throwing it away or sending it to a service center. Anything from putting a new cord on an electric blanket to fixing that old toaster with the cloth covered cord your mom inherited from her mother made in 1936. Last one I remember probably closed in '68 or '69.
 
Remember the Umbrella man? He probably had been in business tucked into a corner or hole in an arcade downtown since before WW11. Just like his still surviving counterpart the shoe repairman who saved soles for a living, he fixed your otherwise thrown away umbrella. Every downtown had one somewhere.
 
Furrier storage? Hat repair and blockers? The TV repair shop is rapidly becoming the next casualty.
 
One thing we had here that may or may not have been an institution elsewhere was communal television. Usually found on an empty lot, a furniture store or appliance sales would sponsor a TV set set up on a small, stage each evening hooked up to a PA system. Folks from all around the surrounding neighborhood would gather each night and I'm not sure if they brought their own chairs or they were supplied to watch TV. I don't remember seeing these corner lot events after '63 or '64. Mostly older people that got out of the hot house for the evening.
 
Naturepats and Chiropractors that were grandfathered in to practice limited medicine rather then going to a Dr. Again, not many like that left after the 60's.
 
Are diaper services still around or did pampers put them all out of business?
 
Knife sharpeners? These were guys that drove around on a specially modified bicycle. They had a gimmick like an ice cream truck. The one in our neighborhood used to have a flute-like instrument that he'd play a musical sequence I still can hear in my head announcing he's on your block. There was some sort of mechanism that was connected to the rear wheel that when the bike was parked and raised, the pedals drove a sharpening wheel. These guys are still around here driving trucks, but rare.
 
Rooming houses?
 
Footmen? Maybe something we had. Another acade dweller, but not in the corners, somewhere out in the open complete with a mini stage that he'd do pitches for some patent medicine foot product he pushed. In between the pitches he had a special chair the weary shoppers would sit in or people that had minor foot problems would go see rather then a podiatrist. He could treat corns, bunions, callouses, ingrown nails, aching feet, custom fit your shoes with supports and inserts, some even practiced a sort of sanitized reflexology.
 
Real five and dimes. Not dollar stores. Neisner's, GC Murphy, Woolworths, Kress, and others and inependents. Maybe still around. I mean the full bore ones that sold a little bit of everything and kept the old ladies supplied with parakeets and canaries. They were like a Hallmark,toy store, pet shop,notion and sewing supply, candy store, craft store,and lunch counter rolled into one store. Then there was their close cousins the Sundry Store or Shop. You never knew what you'd find in one of those.
 
The world's changed dramatically in our lifetime just over a few years unlike yesterday when things pretty much remained the same for decades.
Foodbme
Porterhouse
Re:Things Forgotten 2012/07/24 05:03:22
The Door-to-Door Fuller Brush Man. (Still a very few around)
Debit Insurance Men selling Nickel Insurance policies.
Neighborhood Grocery Stores where the clerk would take your list, go around the store picking up your items, writing up a slip and then allowing you to come in on payday and pay your bill.
Encyclopedia Salesmen!
Gas Station Attendents to check your oil and wash your windows. Check the radiator too!
post edited by Foodbme - 2012/07/24 05:07:26
Foodbme
Porterhouse
Re:Things Forgotten 2012/07/24 05:16:09
Coal Delivery Trucks where men shoveled the coal onto a chute, thru a little window, into a coal bin in the basement of your house.
http://www.whippanyrailwaymuseum.net/index.php/exhibits/equipment/vintage-equipment/coal-delivery-truck
Milk Delivery men!
post edited by Foodbme - 2012/07/24 05:19:15
carlton pierre
Double Chili Cheeseburger
Re:Things Forgotten 2012/07/24 08:25:37
Tube testing machines where you would take the "tubes" fromyour TV and test them to see if they were still good.  If not, they had the spares in the lower part of the machine for you to purchase.
Party lines telephones.  Either someone was listening to your call or you couldn't make a call because someone was already on it.
kennyb
Cheeseburger
Re:Things Forgotten 2012/07/24 08:47:50
we did a show in a small town a few weeks ago and there was a fix it shop there. i commented on it that they arn't around anymore. i don't think things are made now to be fixed.
CCinNJ
Sirloin
Re:Things Forgotten 2012/07/24 08:56:45
They are getting rare but Intimate apparel fit specialists. They really need to make a comeback since many women love to shop for clothes...and sadly...don't realize it all starts at the foundation.
post edited by CCinNJ - 2012/07/24 08:58:05
MetroplexJim
Filet Mignon
Re:Things Forgotten 2012/07/24 09:50:47
Tourist homes - predecessors of the fancy "Bed & Breakfast".
 
Burning your trash in a backyard barrel.
 
"Numbers runners", put out of business by the "legal" government lotteries.
 
Inkwells in school desks.
 
Icemen cometh no more.
 
Penny candy.
 
A nickel for a Coke or a Milky Way.
 
A dime for a loaf of bread.
 
Two dimes for either a quart of milk or a gallon of gas.
 
Silver coins.
 
Come to think about it, two silver dimes now would buy more than a gallon of gas.  A $20 gold piece used to buy a tailored suit; that same gold piece still would - and it probably would be a nicer suit. 
post edited by MetroplexJim - 2012/07/24 10:04:26
CCinNJ
Sirloin
Re:Things Forgotten 2012/07/24 11:01:03
My kids must think Tupperware is still a booming business. Whenever I need them to be out of the house for the evening...I always tell them it's because of a ummm Tupperware party!
kland01s
Filet Mignon
Re:Things Forgotten 2012/07/24 11:06:08
MetroplexJim

Inkwells in school desks.


 
Starting in Middle School around here, they don't even need paper! No need for ink!
kozel
Double Cheeseburger
Re:Things Forgotten 2012/07/24 11:37:30
Foodbme

Coal Delivery Trucks where men shoveled the coal onto a chute, thru a little window, into a coal bin in the basement of your house.
http://www.whippanyrailwaymuseum.net/index.php/exhibits/equipment/vintage-equipment/coal-delivery-truck
Milk Delivery men!

Coal is not gone, completely.  Here on Long Island we have 2 dealers.
http://www.bethlehemcoalcompany.com/
http://www.rellacoal.com/
 
We have 2 coal stoves but haven't used them steadily for a few years.  When we did, we'd get 1 delivery (3 ton) of coal and 1 delivery of oil (about 450gal) a year.  The cats loved it; but we got lazy.  Still have a small amount of nut anthracite in case of a power outage.  I'm not alone; there's a very active forum for people who burn coal.
http://nepacrossroads.com/
CCinNJ
Sirloin
Re:Things Forgotten 2012/07/24 12:12:56
Coal is a vital player in the outstanding Roadfood breads & pizzas of <<<Hoboken>>> It took such a beating delivery is on the hush hush.
post edited by CCinNJ - 2012/07/24 12:19:28
mar52
Sirloin
Re:Things Forgotten 2012/07/24 12:59:15
Cool topic!
 
Dedicated Fabric stores are almost a thing of the past.  Now you have to go to Walmart around here for fabric.
 
(Did that make you all think that I sew?  
 
There used to be a gas station on every major corner here.  Sometimes four at an intersection.  Now you have to travel to find one.
 
They also all used to have garages for your auto problems.  I know of one now.
 
 
kland01s
Filet Mignon
Re:Things Forgotten 2012/07/24 13:12:30
Some of this is regional too I think. We have milkmen that make door to door delivery of milk and other products from a large family dairy. My neighhbor owns a second generation auto repair business and I know of 3 such other businesses in our town. There is a knife sharpener who uses a foot operated grind stone that comes weekly to a local farmers market. we have independant tailors that will make you a whole outfit or suit. I'm not in a fringe area but within the Chicago Metro area.
mar52
Sirloin
Re:Things Forgotten 2012/07/24 14:13:04
Remember the bulletin boards at super markets?  Am I just missing them now?
CCinNJ
Sirloin
Re:Things Forgotten 2012/07/24 14:24:34
My Mother tells me all of my baby pictures were taken at home...by a Photographer. I never asked but I assume it was by appointment not door-to-door...since I was always wearing my fanciest kimonos and my hair was all done up. I'll have to ask if that was an everyday event.
Foodbme
Porterhouse
Re:Things Forgotten 2012/07/24 17:02:18
The Photographer! What a flashback! Forgot all about them!
Yes, they did come to the house, set up their equipment and took the kids pictures. Then came back the following week and sold you a Gazillion Pictures for a month's salary!
Later replaced by Kiosks in retail stores.
Foodbme
Porterhouse
Re:Things Forgotten 2012/07/24 17:07:45
Vegetable Peddlers. Guys with horse drawn carts that peddled fresh in-season Veggies door to door.
Replaced by Farmers Markets.
Guys with a team of horses that would come to your lot and plow the soil for your garden for you. 
Replaced by Gasoline operated tillers and small garden tractors. 
post edited by Foodbme - 2012/07/24 17:09:17
CCinNJ
Sirloin
Re:Things Forgotten 2012/07/24 17:13:33
That took care of the manure drop as well.

BelleReve
Double Chili Cheeseburger
Re:Things Forgotten 2012/07/24 18:27:38
shoe stores that had those metal devices that measured your foot size
 
shoe repair shops - I remember getting metal taps on the edges of the heels and toes of my loafers, thinking I was so cool. They may still sell them, but I think just in plastic, not the same effect at all -
 
 
Louis
Double Cheeseburger
Re:Things Forgotten 2012/07/24 18:52:51
I remember when the milkman from the local dairy used to come to our door several times a week and sell us bottles of milk from his truck.
 
post edited by Louis - 2012/07/24 18:53:57
mar52
Sirloin
Re:Things Forgotten 2012/07/24 19:43:23
Remember white shoe polish? The kind you used on your white Oxfords?   I think I can still smell it.
CCinNJ
Sirloin
Re:Things Forgotten 2012/07/24 19:45:50
The catalog showroom system like Service Merchandise. Fill out your order slip with a pencil...and wait for it to roll out on the conveyor belt. Exciting stuff!
ces1948
Double Chili Cheeseburger
Re:Things Forgotten 2012/07/24 21:56:43
Yes Service Merchandise and a place called Luria's here in Florida. There was another one in Tennessee where we lived but I don't recall the name. I still wonder why that style of shopping fell out of favor.
CCinNJ

The catalog showroom system like Service Merchandise. Fill out your order slip with a pencil...and wait for it to roll out on the conveyor belt. Exciting stuff!


CCinNJ
Sirloin
Re:Things Forgotten 2012/07/24 22:18:39
We had a five & dime store called Mc Crory's. It had a machine that cut window shades to-size. I went with my Mother & Nanny...usually on a weekend evening. I always ran to the machine after saying hello to the fish in the pet dept. and waited and waited and waited for someone to come get a shade cut. It was the emptiest part of the store. Nobody ever came anywhere near it (like it oozed radiation) and no employees were ever close to it.

We had fancy very ornate window shades...so no sale there. If I touched those shades at home...to inspire a purchase of the cheap vinyl shades...I'd be swimming with the Mc Crory's fish.

Right in the middle of the parking lot was a tiny tiny building...a Fotomat.

http://popupcity.net/2011...ooks-for-new-business/
post edited by CCinNJ - 2012/07/24 22:38:33
mar52
Sirloin
Re:Things Forgotten 2012/07/24 22:56:32
Those wax pencils like they used at the bowling alley.... where you unwrapped the paper if the point was too short.
 
X-ray machines at the shoe store.
 
penny target machines
CCinNJ
Sirloin
Re:Things Forgotten 2012/07/24 23:19:51
Macy's Herald Square still offers gift-wrapping services but other than a few other stores...it's been phased-out.

The remaining locations...

Herald Square in New York, State Street in Chicago, Union Square in San Francisco, South Coast Plaza in Orange County, Calif., and Dadeland in Miami.
DawnT
Double Chili Cheeseburger
Re:Things Forgotten 2012/07/24 23:53:22
We had Luria's and they started here as just a hole-in-the-wall jewelry and fine silver dinneware place that also had a catalog order desk. That's the way it was until the mid 70's. Service Merchandise beat them to the catalog showroom. JC Penny's built plaza's with their squiggly roof Treasury department stores and SV. Merchandise served as the co-anchor to all of them from the beginning. BEST moved down not long after and opened these HUGE stores with much more and higher end products in the same format. Luria's followed suit building large stores and then SV merchandise did the same and also in malls. They wound up last store standing. American Signature furniture moved into many of them.
 
Do adult bookstores and theaters exist anymore? I remember them around the fringe areas before video clubs (hmm another relic of the past), All of them around here were painted a lurid yellow with those rotating lights around the edges of their marques. I think the last one I remember seeing was near the university during the latter 80's. Again, while I'm on the subject of books, will we be adding bookstores to this list too? I only know of one Barnes and Noble still open and one indie in the area.
 
Electronics stores. Not what Radio Shack is today, but what they used to be. An electronics experimenters one stop paradise with parts and things you had to have a degree in engineering to figure out how to put together with a soldering iron and stereo equipment that looked like the control panel of a 747 and people still listened to those black,flat,round things with pretty covers.  Olsen's, 21rst Centrury, Lafyette, and Radio Shack when it was Allied. And again, when was the last time you seen a record/CD store?
 
Hobby Shops.  The real ones that had balsa, dope (butyrate),paints, metal stock, chemicals to refill a chemistry set, model planes and rockets (balsa and paper), airplane engines,etc. Not these craft stores with an isle of plastic models and completely built RC vehicles for hundreds of dollars. A real model kit was nothing more then a cardboard box with a bolt of tissue paper, several sheets and pieces of balsa and plans/instructions. Oh yeah, good ones had a couple of slot car tracks. What's a slot car right?
CCinNJ
Sirloin
Re:Things Forgotten 2012/07/25 00:07:15
There are a few adult one-stop whatever shops near the Port Authority bus station in NYC. Reading material is mostly found in "candy stores" that magazine lottery tickets cigarettes are sold. Record stores are popular in the East Village.

Used electronic stores are found all over Union City (mostly used equipment and parts)
We have some art supply stores...and a few model railroad stores that carry other hobby supplies like dollhouse stuff model cars tracks airplane etc.

Dedicated bicycle shops are very popular here.

The automat restaurant concept might be the closest to a RF blast from the past. Bamn came and went a few years ago.
post edited by CCinNJ - 2012/07/25 01:32:47
Hot Dog Empire
Cheeseburger
Re:Things Forgotten 2012/07/25 10:42:50
Anyone still get S&H Greenstamps? I havent seen them in years!
Michael Hoffman
Double-chop Porterhouse
Re:Things Forgotten 2012/07/25 11:47:28
I haven't forgotten anything. I even remember my pet pterodactyl's name -- Lucybird. And that was back when I was 8 years old.
kland01s
Filet Mignon
Re:Things Forgotten 2012/07/25 16:41:55
DawnT

Do adult bookstores and theaters exist anymore? I remember them around the fringe areas before video clubs (hmm another relic of the past), All of them around here were painted a lurid yellow with those rotating lights around the edges of their marques. I think the last one I remember seeing was near the university during the latter 80's. Again, while I'm on the subject of books, will we be adding bookstores to this list too? I only know of one Barnes and Noble still open and one indie in the area.

Electronics stores. Not what Radio Shack is today, but what they used to be. An electronics experimenters one stop paradise with parts and things you had to have a degree in engineering to figure out how to put together with a soldering iron and stereo equipment that looked like the control panel of a 747 and people still listened to those black,flat,round things with pretty covers.  Olsen's, 21rst Centrury, Lafyette, and Radio Shack when it was Allied. And again, when was the last time you seen a record/CD store?

Hobby Shops.  The real ones that had balsa, dope (butyrate),paints, metal stock, chemicals to refill a chemistry set, model planes and rockets (balsa and paper), airplane engines,etc. Not these craft stores with an isle of plastic models and completely built RC vehicles for hundreds of dollars. A real model kit was nothing more then a cardboard box with a bolt of tissue paper, several sheets and pieces of balsa and plans/instructions. Oh yeah, good ones had a couple of slot car tracks. What's a slot car right?

 
Again I think this is a regional thing. I know of an "adult" store that I have passed at the Rte. 71 exit of I-80 outside of Ottawa Illinois. Closer to my home we have several "Gentlemen's" Clubs and probaly other things I don't know of, the other 2 are on major streets in respectable, affluent areas.
As far as hobby shops, there is one in my  town and one in the next town over, both large independants, owned locally. We also have American Science and Supply which is a science surplus that is full just about anything to make some wild gadgets. Maybe not regional but at least in the far reaching fringe of Chicagoland.


BelleReve
Double Chili Cheeseburger
Re:Things Forgotten 2012/07/26 16:21:45
fountain pens - talking about inkwells, I remember when you bought your own bottles of ink and refilled the pens
 
flit guns - sounds menacing, but really a pump  - our mosquitoes are so bad this year with the mild winter we had, made me think of this
MilwFoodlovers
Filet Mignon
Re:Things Forgotten 2012/07/26 20:47:21
BelleReve, when you mentioned mosquitoes, I thought of the punks we lit to ward them off.
I wonder what those consisted of?
DawnT
Double Chili Cheeseburger
Re:Things Forgotten 2012/07/26 21:27:27
I remember those spiral things that sort of looked like an electric burner on a stove. You lit them on one end. It wasn't citronella. Then there were those sulphur bombs that you put into an enclosed area and lit and it smoked the place out with fumes. Dead bugs would be everywhere that crawled out from their hiding places. Those worked, not like these canned fumigators you buy now. We didn't have FIT,  or at least I never heard of it,  but Raid came with the same pump in the orange and black colors like the later spray cans. Those pumps quit working after a while. 
FriedClamFanatic
Double Chili Cheeseburger
Re:Things Forgotten 2012/07/26 22:06:10
Alas.the Internet.the new "pick up the phone and ask the operator to connect you" crashed on my first attempt. let me try and re-construct
 
In New England, we had Hoods Milk delivered several times a month ( in the UK where we lived in the early 90's they still did that......with nice elecric vehicles that were realtively quiet at 6 AM..they also delivered the Sunday paper)
 
Entemann's tried it with baked Goods.  I remember seeing them when I was doing my paper route(!).  I think it was short lived. I also used to "win" lots of neat stuff by selling imprinted Christmas Cards and Magazine subscriptions to my paper customers. The 20 cents they left me every week helped to fill out my coin collection.
 
We never bought the Encyclopedia Brittanica from our local rep (an ex- school teacher).  Instead, my Mom got a really neat set - a volume each week -  from the local First National Supermarket for something like 99 cents each.  And she got Green Stamps!  She was overjoyed when S&H opened a local stamp redemption centre in our town ( in the old place where Sears had its Catalog Showroom/Order/Pickup).  Certainly beat going to the train station to see if REA had brought the goodies.
 
I remember the guy who would come around every summer to sharpen knives.............always to the backdoor.
 
Instead of buying frozen food at the First National, The A&P, or whatever else was back then, I remember going to the "Locker Plant" where you could rent big pull-out drawers in their freezer to store your summer produce.  I thin a couple of times we also got those Mega Meat packages you could get from local butchers or door to door salesmen (actually, usually women) where you'd buy like 100-200 pounds of "stuff" and then freeze it.
 
Later on, The Book of the Month club and Columbia records were favs...as long as I remembered to send back the card when I didn't want anything.
 
Not sure when they gave up the Christmas Club at the bank....or decided to stay open later than 3 in the afternoon. Probably soon after all those big In-state mergers happened..or maybe when they finally went National.  Some of the banks even offered "credit cards".  Not sure why we needede them when we could always walk into a local store and ask them to "charge it"
 
On that note.as senilty starts to re-creep across my addled brain, I"ll go back to my assisted living room.  I no longer have to pay doctors on a "pay as you go" basis, so I guess I'm better off.
 
Gonna go back to playing with my SLINKY...sometime it's more fun than this combo book/TV/Movie Theater/Post Office (with and without the FBI top 10 List)/Encyclopedia that I keep on my metal fold up tray-table where I are TV dinners.
CCinNJ
Sirloin
Re:Things Forgotten 2012/07/27 20:54:43
I NEVER thought this was still around when I remembered it as a forgotten item...

http://www.harrietcarter.com/product/surprise-box/

The SURPRISE BOX!

Now I have to try to remember what surprises were in my surprise boxes.
I pronounce surprise...suprise.
post edited by CCinNJ - 2012/07/27 21:00:51
ann peeples
Sirloin
Re:Things Forgotten 2012/07/28 08:46:55
This is a fun conversation!! There are still adult video stores in southeast Wisconsin, usually right off the highway without any other businesses around them. I noticed while in the south, gentlemen clubs are still quite popular. My mother was dedicated to the Fuller Brush man-she thought their products were the best. Knife sharpeners are still alive and well in the food business...our guy comes in twice a month. Oh, and the milkman-besides being labeled his daughter by my father( with a wink) I used to add to Moms order, chocolate milk, and she used to get confused as she didnt remember ordering it.
Michael Hoffman
Double-chop Porterhouse
Re:Things Forgotten 2012/07/28 11:08:54
Why Ann Peeples, you devil.
CCinNJ
Sirloin
Re:Things Forgotten 2012/07/28 11:14:59
Pay phones (eww lose that dime) are pretty much a thing of the past. Phone booths are pretty much long gone.
BelleReve
Double Chili Cheeseburger
Re:Things Forgotten 2012/07/28 15:00:56
I remember the mosquito coils too, were they called punks?  Flit was just one brand of insecticide, so it became a generic term to use for the spray and pump we used for killing mosquitoes, now replaced by bug zappers and aerosol cans.
 
Ordering stuff from cereal box tops - a howdy doody ring, then there was that little scuba man that had a compartment you filled with baking soda and then you watched him do what exactly in the bathtub, descend, or fizzle around?
 
 
MilwFoodlovers
Filet Mignon
Re:Things Forgotten 2012/07/28 21:07:54
No, punks were on a skinny stick. I'm guessing they were/are made of the same material.
 
Michael Hoffman
Double-chop Porterhouse
Re:Things Forgotten 2012/07/28 21:11:09
Punks were what we uysed to light salutes and cherry bombs. As a matter of fact, I got some a couple of years ago when I bought fireworks.
CCinNJ
Sirloin
Re:Things Forgotten 2012/07/28 22:24:35
Growing up there was a very small ShopRite Supermarket in the neighborhood. At the end of the pre-barcode registers (in front of the windows) as far as the eye could see....boxes and boxes on U-Boats...for home delivery.
MikeS.
Fire Safety Admin
Re:Things Forgotten 2012/07/29 03:09:30
BelleReve

shoe stores that had those metal devices that measured your foot size

shoe repair shops - I remember getting metal taps on the edges of the heels and toes of my loafers, thinking I was so cool. They may still sell them, but I think just in plastic, not the same effect at all -

 
Still have several of both around here.

ken8038
Double Chili Cheeseburger
Re:Things Forgotten 2012/07/29 08:04:33
Radio station Top 40 surveys. I used to live for those each week from WABC and WMCA as a teen in the 60's. Now on radio they hardly ever even tell you who's singing or what the title is, let alone what number it is.
CCinNJ
Sirloin
Re:Things Forgotten 2012/07/29 08:15:30
Another NYC radio happening when I was younger was Bernard Meltzer and "What's your problem?" Any problem. The cat is sick. The kitchen sink has a leak. The brakes squeak. You need a restaurant reservation. The boss won't let you take vacation. You're mother-in-law is coming for a visit...and will stay TOO long.

And that could be all in one phone call! They called him Doctor Meltzer. Whenever my sister and I need to explain something to one another we always start by saying...Hello Docta Meltza...I love your show! If you didn't have a thick accent you didn't make the show.
post edited by CCinNJ - 2012/07/29 08:25:04
MetroplexJim
Filet Mignon
Re:Things Forgotten 2012/07/29 11:15:10
Speaking of "things forgotten", what about life before the internet?  Thanks, Al!
 
In all seriousness, the kids I teach were all born in the 1990's.  They can't imagine a world without the internet, cell phones, and computers, much less a world without electronic calculators.  And, they've never heard of Mick Jagger!
 
-------------
Anyone old enough to remember the old mechanical "calculators" that would take a minute to noisily divide, say, 120 by 6?
plb
Double Chili Cheeseburger
Re:Things Forgotten 2012/07/29 11:38:15
I still have my old Post slide rule from college.  No, I never wore it hanging from my belt.
CCinNJ
Sirloin
Re:Things Forgotten 2012/07/29 11:48:00
The vintage fitness equipment before good running shoes were developed.

The tin foil suits...vibrating belt machines and slim gym hammock type of things.
mar52
Sirloin
Re:Things Forgotten 2012/07/29 16:05:44
Adding machines with ten rows of numbers and a hand crank.
 
Was this already mentioned?
 
My memory.
Buck & Vi's
Double Cheeseburger
Re:Things Forgotten 2012/07/29 18:35:52
THE old check writers that imbossed the name of the establisment on the check(or in it) i remember a guy coming into the "service" station that my dad ran and showed us how crooks could get into an envelope, take a check out, redo it so it read for more $$ cash it and be on there way....matter of fact i was in a local bank and i think i saw onr sitting on a file cabinet, prob. still use them today? or the a&p stores used to have one in my home town but it went out many years ago. we lived next door to chuech and every sunday early a.m. i used to watch as they set up a sunday newspaper stand for when church got out, when it did they were bombed!sunday paper for .75...gas for .35 a gallon !!!
kland01s
Filet Mignon
Re:Things Forgotten 2012/07/29 18:40:53
plb

I still have my old Post slide rule from college.  No, I never wore it hanging from my belt.

I do too plus my old drafting tools and templates. I started working as a draftsmen in 1965 when we used real ink and drop pens and such. Stayed in the business untill I became CAD Manager in1995. Stayed working with computers until 2005. Dinosaeur.
mayor al
Fire Safety Admin
Re:Things Forgotten 2012/07/29 19:31:46
I bought a "Bowmar Brain" for $99 in 1972. It would work for about an hour on it's battery then required plugging in for 4 hours to recharge it.
 
I had the jobs at home of
1. Coloring the margarine (sp?) or Oleo in the 1 lb bag, by busting the color dye button and working the color evenly thru the white "butter".
2. Pulling my little red wagon home from the grocery in suburban L A  for my mother as we did a week's grocery shopping. (about a 5 block walk to the supermarket). 
     My Step-dad was a CPA with an office at home. He had one of the Marchant Calculators described by others. Every time I tried to use it , it jammed in the full-speed  ahead mode with unstopping wheels-spinning. 
    We attended  church regularly...and I was expected to wear a suit and tie to church...and NOT "Un-Tuck" my shirt or loosen my tie until I got home.
5. I like GPS units, but I prefer to go to AAA and get trip-tickets and route maps on paper for any new roadtrips we are taking. Old habits die hard..
6. SoCal readers may remember the Helms Bakery trucks/vans that toured thru our neighborhoods tooting their whistle.  We had the same driver for over ten years. When I came home from Vietnam in 1962 on recuperation leave he stopped by on the first day after I arrived with a special cake...unordered by us, to welcome me home.  he knew his customers pretty well.
7 Remember when "Bubble-up" soda appeared in the 16 oz bottle and all us kids stopped buying Coke and Pepsi to get "MORE"  for our money. Then RC followed suit and we switched again.
9. Our first Post-war car was a '50 Studebaker Champion. Stepfather traded his '38 Buick for it (plus $900) in 1951.  Our First  AT car was the next buy in 1956, A Brand-new Buick Special, with no power steering. My Mom hated trying to park that battleship in store parking lots.
10. In 1959 I flew "Pink-Cloud Airlines" from CA to Hawaii for $75 each way. Plane was a DC-6  all Pink, with flight attendants in uniforms to match.  A family vacation was a real eye-opener for a 16 year old . Stepdad was bombed with all the free booze on the flight.
 
 
mar52
Sirloin
Re:Things Forgotten 2012/07/30 00:04:00
How about those little keyring copies of your license plate?
 
My first and last was a California 1969 license plate... ZCD 607
CCinNJ
Sirloin
Re:Things Forgotten 2012/07/30 00:33:37
Legal supply stores. Forms kits embossers rubber stamps ect. specific to the legal office & notary fields. No toys or Cheez Doodles. Various organizations held meetings in the back rooms. Popular in NYC....years ago.
DawnT
Double Chili Cheeseburger
Re:Things Forgotten 2012/07/31 18:33:43
Is this what you were referring to CC?
 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oGvIlYJOcRE
This is for real folks. http://www.mrbra.com/ 
Shudder!
 
 
CCinNJ

They are getting rare but Intimate apparel fit specialists. They really need to make a comeback since many women love to shop for clothes...and sadly...don't realize it all starts at the foundation.


CCinNJ
Sirloin
Re:Things Forgotten 2012/07/31 20:10:52
I think I broke a rib!

Well...maybe not 15 minutes with Mr. Bra unless you lose a bet an it's fitting with Mr. Bra or a tattoo.. Although...Mr. Bra really does know a thing or two about fitting.



MilwFoodlovers
Filet Mignon
Re:Things Forgotten 2012/07/31 20:15:52
Crucial, crucial videos. Thank you DawnT
lol
carlton pierre
Double Chili Cheeseburger
Re:Things Forgotten 2012/08/01 07:51:00
Typewriters, electric or manual
Treetop Tom
Cheeseburger
Re:Things Forgotten 2012/08/01 10:08:44
1.  Hearing static between radio stations while tuning through the dial.
2.  Having to load DOS and command.command from a floppy disk.
3.  Dropping your film off to be processed at some remote Kodak lab.
4.  Hershey bars in the two-piece foil & paper wrapper. 
5.  Picking and eating a tomato right off the vine and having it taste delicious.
post edited by Treetop Tom - 2012/08/01 10:17:00
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