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 "First Nations Cuisine"

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tiki

  • Total Posts: 4135
  • Joined: 7/7/2003
  • Location: Rentiesville, OK
"First Nations Cuisine" Wed, 03/23/05 5:54 PM (permalink)
I am VERY interested in anything that any of you guys may kn ow about places out serving First Nations or "Aboriginal" or Native Peoples cuisine.Im not looking for Powwow foods like "indian Tacos"-- I'm think more in line of say Dolly Watts from Vancover and her Lilget Faest House Restaraunt or David Wofman and his Canadian show. I have also heard of a couple in Portland Oregon--the Divina's-that have what i hav been told is a wonderful place called "Fiddleheads". I havent eaten in any their places but i LOVE the idea behind their foods---traditional FOODS searved in a contempory manner and style--sounds wonderful! Any of you know ANYTHING about any of these places--or any other like them

BTW--this interest was all brought about via a cookbook my wifebrought home for me--(she works at the Five Civilized Tribes Museum in Muskogge Ok) called "body,mind & spirit"--"Native cooing of the Americas. I hightly reccomend it---( by Beverly Cox and Martin Jacobs forewrd by N Scoot Momady and publishede by Native Peoples Magazine)
 
#1
    BT

    • Total Posts: 3589
    • Joined: 7/3/2004
    • Location: San Francisco, CA
    RE: "First Nations Cuisine" Wed, 03/23/05 6:54 PM (permalink)

    • The Art of American Indian Cooking by Yeffe Kimball
    • Pueblo Indian Cookbook: Recipes from the Pueblos of the American Southwest by Phyllis Hughes
    • Foods of the Southwest Indian Nations: Traditional & Contemporary Native American Recipes by Lois Ellen Frank
    • Spirit of the Harvest : North American Indian Cooking by Martin Jacobs
    • Southwest Indian Cookbook by Marcia Keegan
    • American Indian Cooking: Recipes from the Southwest by Carolyn J. Niethammer
     
    #2
      tiki

      • Total Posts: 4135
      • Joined: 7/7/2003
      • Location: Rentiesville, OK
      RE: "First Nations Cuisine" Wed, 03/23/05 7:02 PM (permalink)
      BT--thanks---i have some of these--Have you been to any of the restaraunts??? I search and search and have found any near me--or in my travels---YET!!! I am in a area where there are LOTS of native american owned casinos and i think that it would follw that ONE of them would at least try thye idea in their dining rooms--would love to get some idea of the reception of the the dining public.
       
      #3
        BT

        • Total Posts: 3589
        • Joined: 7/3/2004
        • Location: San Francisco, CA
        RE: "First Nations Cuisine" Wed, 03/23/05 7:59 PM (permalink)
        quote:
        Originally posted by tiki

        BT--thanks---i have some of these--Have you been to any of the restaraunts??? I search and search and have found any near me--or in my travels---YET!!! I am in a area where there are LOTS of native american owned casinos and i think that it would follw that ONE of them would at least try thye idea in their dining rooms--would love to get some idea of the reception of the the dining public.


        The only place I have sampled Native American food has been at 2 local missions: (1) Mission San Javier del Bac ( http://anza.uoregon.edu/Action.lasso?-database=gallery&-layout=standard&-op=eq&ImageFileName=sanjavier.jpg&-response=format/galleryfmt.html&-noResultserror=/sorry.html&-search ) and (2) Mission San Jose' de Tumacacori ( http://anza.uoregon.edu/Action.lasso?-database=gallery&-layout=standard&-op=eq&ImageFileName=tumacacori.jpg&-response=format/galleryfmt.html&-noResultserror=/sorry.html&-search ) . There is a small pueblo across the road from San Javier, a glorious 18th century mission, claimed to be the best example of Spanish colonial architecture in the US, where they sell Native American handicrafts and food. It's quite popular with visitors who are quite numerous since this is one of Tucson's best known tourist attractions. At San Jose', where tourist traffic is much less, there is only a small stand run by Native Americans selling mainly fry bread as I recall. Actually, fry bread sold from stands and trucks is pretty popular hereabouts: http://waltonfeed.com/peoples/navajo/recipes/frybread.html
         
        #4
          tiki

          • Total Posts: 4135
          • Joined: 7/7/2003
          • Location: Rentiesville, OK
          RE: "First Nations Cuisine" Wed, 03/23/05 10:47 PM (permalink)
          Yep--had LOTS of fry bread--what id LOVE to try is Pastel de Paps(Andean Potato and cheese pie)and Maple Vinegar Rack Of Venison or Curried Fidddlehead and carrot soup!!! Some of these sound fabulous---just gonna have to cook em myself i guess--byt ud love to hear anyones tale os First Nation cusine!
           
          #5
            SouthHillbilly

            • Total Posts: 295
            • Joined: 1/15/2005
            • Location: Alum Creek, WV
            RE: "First Nations Cuisine" Thu, 03/24/05 1:17 AM (permalink)
            Eat a potato, a bean, pepper, tomato, squash, rice, corn and most of the vegetables we eat today and you're eating food that originated in America. The Europeans were pretty much eating nothing but meat and grains until they came west to America.
            It's ALL "first nations" food.
             
            #6
              tiki

              • Total Posts: 4135
              • Joined: 7/7/2003
              • Location: Rentiesville, OK
              RE: "First Nations Cuisine" Thu, 03/24/05 7:17 AM (permalink)
              quote:
              Originally posted by SouthHillbilly

              Eat a potato, a bean, pepper, tomato, squash, rice, corn and most of the vegetables we eat today and you're eating food that originated in America. The Europeans were pretty much eating nothing but meat and grains until they came west to America.
              It's ALL "first nations" food.


              True--but being a first Nation FOOD doesnt make it First Nation Cuisine--this is a "Style" of cooking im talkin about nessasarily an "Ingredient"---although those ingredients that we "Euro-americans" don't ordinarily include in our every day diet interest me as well--and the "combination" of these foods. For instance--although a tomato is a First Nation FOOD----spaghetti with marianara sauce ISNT!
               
              #7
                efuery

                • Total Posts: 630
                • Joined: 12/23/2003
                • Location: Danbury, CT
                RE: "First Nations Cuisine" Thu, 03/24/05 8:10 AM (permalink)
                Try these sites:

                http://www.kstrom.net/isk/food/recipes.html - Pretty interesting stuff here, not all about food

                http://www.oneida-nation.net/FRAMESfood.html (three sisters cookbook - Onieda Nation)

                http://www.inmamaskitchen.com/FOOD_IS_ART/nativeamer.html (Cherokee)
                 
                #8
                  kland01s

                  • Total Posts: 2835
                  • Joined: 3/14/2003
                  • Location: Fox River Valley, IL
                  RE: "First Nations Cuisine" Thu, 03/24/05 9:57 AM (permalink)
                  Looking forward to going to it some day but the Smithsonian's new National Museum of the American Indian has a cafe featuring Indian foods, couldn't find any info on their website as to what they serve. Best Indian food I have had was at the Santa Clara Pueblo on feast day. My Santa Fe friend was good friends of one of the Pueblo's elders and we were invited into his home for feast day, it was an incredible meal but photos are not allowed and I don't remember what we ate.
                   
                  #9
                    Donna Douglass

                    • Total Posts: 508
                    • Joined: 8/22/2000
                    • Location: Columbus, OH
                    RE: "First Nations Cuisine" Thu, 03/24/05 10:12 AM (permalink)
                    We had lunch one day at the Tigua Indian Reservation in El Paso, had chili (?) and Flauta (?), neither of which are Native American dishes. Can't figure that one out.

                    Also ate at the little restaurant in connection with the small museum on the Gila Indian Reservation south of Phoenix, and had their version of tacos (fry bread with stew, chili, or whatever). After nine years in Arizona, can't say that we ever did have a truly Native American dish. That was a disappointment. Maybe we should have lived out there a bit longer.

                    Donna
                     
                    #10
                      tiki

                      • Total Posts: 4135
                      • Joined: 7/7/2003
                      • Location: Rentiesville, OK
                      RE: "First Nations Cuisine" Thu, 03/24/05 10:53 AM (permalink)
                      quote:
                      Originally posted by Donna Douglass

                      We had lunch one day at the Tigua Indian Reservation in El Paso, had chili (?) and Flauta (?), neither of which are Native American dishes. Can't figure that one out.

                      Also ate at the little restaurant in connection with the small museum on the Gila Indian Reservation south of Phoenix, and had their version of tacos (fry bread with stew, chili, or whatever). After nine years in Arizona, can't say that we ever did have a truly Native American dish. That was a disappointment. Maybe we should have lived out there a bit longer.

                      Donna


                      Actually--almost ALL "Mexican" or "Southwestern Style" recipes--like tamales-salsa-Mole---are indeed First Nation or Native Peoples recipes. Very little of the classic Mexican dishes are Spanish in origin. And bean and corn dishes are REALLY prevelent in Native American cultures all over hemisphere. It is the one new world cuisine that has managed to thrive in the States.
                       
                      #11
                        SouthHillbilly

                        • Total Posts: 295
                        • Joined: 1/15/2005
                        • Location: Alum Creek, WV
                        RE: "First Nations Cuisine" Thu, 03/24/05 12:24 PM (permalink)
                        I've spent quite a bit of time with NAs at home on the res and other places and have yet to really identify any specific food culture. . . I'd like to, but haven't.
                        One of my good friends who lives on a res in Canada eats curry dishes all the time. . . real Indian food.

                        True story:
                        I stopped at a roadside veggie stand on a res in Canada one time back in the mid 90s. I asked the native woman if she had any squash and she got me a couple crook necks from under the counter. Before she gave them to me she looked at me inquisitively and asked "how do you cook your squash." Immediately went into a long description of pan fried with peppers, onions and tomatoes, baked and stuffed with sausage, etc., mashed and on and on. When I got done I thought, "ok, now I'm going to get some good NA recipes for squash," so I gave her an inquisitive look and ask "how do YOU cook squash."
                        Her reply. . . "in the microwave."
                         
                        #12
                          mtbuckingham

                          • Total Posts: 65
                          • Joined: 2/2/2004
                          • Location: Washington, DC, DC
                          RE: "First Nations Cuisine" Thu, 03/24/05 1:19 PM (permalink)
                          quote:


                          True story:
                          I stopped at a roadside veggie stand on a res in Canada one time back in the mid 90s. I asked the native woman if she had any squash and she got me a couple crook necks from under the counter. Before she gave them to me she looked at me inquisitively and asked "how do you cook your squash." Immediately went into a long description of pan fried with peppers, onions and tomatoes, baked and stuffed with sausage, etc., mashed and on and on. When I got done I thought, "ok, now I'm going to get some good NA recipes for squash," so I gave her an inquisitive look and ask "how do YOU cook squash."
                          Her reply. . . "in the microwave."


                          Totally off topic, but this reminds me of a long-ago foray into Philly's Chinatown with an ex-boyfriend that was suffering from constant, severe headaches that no doctors seemed to be able to help with. We found ourselves in front of a Chinese herbal healing store (I know there's a name for this, but I'm spacing...). Maybe it carries the secret (or at least something new and exotic to try), we thought, as we entered the tiny store and surveyed the walls of jars of unknown medicines. An old Chinese man emerged- we could see the wisdom in his eyes as we asked for his sage advice. After some communication struggles, he finally got a gleam in his eye, a knowing smile on his face, and said "OOOHHH..... TYLENOL!"
                           
                          #13
                            BakersBoy

                            • Total Posts: 302
                            • Joined: 3/13/2004
                            • Location: Annapolis, MD
                            RE: "First Nations Cuisine" Thu, 03/24/05 1:25 PM (permalink)
                            Tiki,

                            Take a day trip and go out to the Acoma Pueblo in New Mexico, the last time I visited they had a good restaurant. If not there the go to the Taos Pueblo. Great visit and really good food. Perhaps this will help: http://www.indianpueblo.org/ipcc/acomapage.htm.

                            BB
                             
                            #14
                              dctourist

                              • Total Posts: 325
                              • Joined: 7/23/2004
                              • Location: Washington, DC
                              RE: "First Nations Cuisine" Thu, 03/24/05 1:36 PM (permalink)
                              There's the Hopi Cultural Center on Second(?) Mesa in Northern Arizona (Hopi
                              Res is within the Navajo Res, north of the Grand Canyon). It's many years ago now, but
                              I remember having some kind of lamb stew with fry bread. And I seem to recall
                              it was included in one of the older Road Food editions.
                               
                              #15
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