the best corn on the cob

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michaelgemmell
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RE: the best corn on the cob 2004/09/22 19:23:16 (permalink)
Emily, one of the things that confounds me about the French (and I'm 1/4 myself) is their rejection of corn as human food. It tends to suggest that instead of being epicures--not afraid to try any food obviously wholesome--that some French, at least, are just food snobs. Gee, they'd fit right in here in San Francisco! Please see if you can find sweet corn and make it for your friends.

Aren't we all lucky enough to live where our favorite varieties are grown? Science indeed is responsible for corn that will stay sweet after harvest, and, frankly, some is better, but I like it all. For that matter, what's with my fellow Californians shucking the corn in the grocery store? Nature provided corn with a wrapper that helps keep it fresh. Why leave that wrapper at the store? You're paying by the ear, not the pound, so why bring home corn that's turning stale as you pay for it?

I shuck and silk it, trim the bottom (get every last bit of the husk off now!) and put it in a large kettle of cold water--nothing else. Put on the lid, bring to a boil, then turn off the flame. Leave the lid on and wait 20 minutes for corn that's perfectly cooked every time. Wait a little longer and it will still not get overcooked. I melt butter, pour it into a corn dish and roll the ear in it, which is less messy and wasteful than cold butter from the fridge.

Friends in Iowa in mid-August simply soaked the unshucked corn in cold water for two minutes, then grilled. They removed the husk and silk afterwards, with one quick motion--all silk gone. Delicious!

Muppets corn is shucked and washed. Mix a package of Knorr (not Lipton, it's too salty) onion soup mix into 1/2 pound softened UNsalted butter. Spread thickly on the corn, wrap individually in foil and grill. Oops, I don't remember for how long! This works baking it in the oven, too. When you unwrap it, it's buttered and salted.

An old Midwestern trick is to put a little peanut butter on the corn after butter and before salt. A LITTLE! It just makes it taste sweeter somehow. Once I stretched the Muppets butter mix with peanut butter. No one noticed the peanut butter taste but all kept complimenting me on the very sweet corn.

Forget those plastic corn holders with the nails embedded, they never last. Williams-Sonoma sells stainless steel cornholders, and they're as strong as--stainless steel! They're not cheap, but they should last forever.

I just asked my partner if he'd go to the store--for corn! He said no. Alas!
#31
redtressed
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RE: the best corn on the cob 2004/09/22 20:15:25 (permalink)
I still raise Silver Queen, using the offspring of the seeds we have saved every harvest since I was a little girl, not by purchasing new. I also grow Ambrosia, Milk and Honey, and Pontiac Yellow, which is not as sweet and good to use for freezing whole cobs for consumption in the winter(doesn't get as hard and starchy). I generally either steam corn or grill it in the husk. As for accoutrements, for Ambrosia and Milk and Honey....it absolutely needs none. For yellow corn, I either use a spray butter, or make a butter flavored with seasoned salt and Tennessee Sunshine sauce(a vinegar based hot sauce with large flakes of pepper in it)
#32
4fish
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RE: the best corn on the cob 2004/09/22 20:46:37 (permalink)
In my town, those in "in the know" wait for Mr. Traastad's orange-sided truck to show up in the parking lot at South Lanes. He grows several different varieties and staggers the planting times so he's always got something ready to sell. Due to a very cool, wet summer, corn season was late here in Wisconsin. It was the second week in August before the local growers started picking.

Aside from gorging on boiled corn with butter, I've been trying something new to freeze it for winter. I cut it off the cob, spread it out on a sheet pan, drizzle with a little olive or peanut oil, salt & pepper, then roast for five to eight minutes. You have to watch it because it goes from done to burned quickly! But it freezes very well and makes a tasty addition to salads and casseroles besides being good all by itself. I think this week or next will probably be the last picking, so I'll have to get another dozen ears for roasting.
#33
Cakes
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RE: the best corn on the cob 2004/09/22 23:00:10 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by redtressed

I still raise Silver Queen, using the offspring of the seeds we have saved every harvest since I was a little girl, not by purchasing new. I also grow Ambrosia, Milk and Honey, and Pontiac Yellow, which is not as sweet and good to use for freezing whole cobs for consumption in the winter(doesn't get as hard and starchy). I generally either steam corn or grill it in the husk. As for accoutrements, for Ambrosia and Milk and Honey....it absolutely needs none. For yellow corn, I either use a spray butter, or make a butter flavored with seasoned salt and Tennessee Sunshine sauce(a vinegar based hot sauce with large flakes of pepper in it)


Redtressed,

I hate to tell you this but the corn you have been eating for years is not Silver queen. Silver queen is a hybrid which means it is cross bred from 2 different strains. The seeds from a hybrid will not reproduce the hybrid. They will reproduce one of the parent strains.

Not that there is anything wrong with this.

I could really bore you with details about bull corn and seed corn and detassling (sp?) but take it from someone that grew up in Iowa, it's not Silver Queen.

Cakes
#34
redtressed
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RE: the best corn on the cob 2004/09/23 01:43:29 (permalink)
You are correct Cakes, on most points on this and for the commercial Silver Queen hybrid. The difference for this however, is that this was not from a commercial or home grown availiabilty. This strain/hybrid of Silver Queen was an experiment done by a southern university's plantpathologists, reason of developing a more disease and pest resistant corn. The mutations invoked did not do the resistance they were trying to acheive, in fact they weakened the "longevity" of the hybrids that were used, but adversely, in their opinion, the mutation that did occur was the retention of an almost pure composition ofthe original hybrid in successive plantings. It was never marketed or distributed for use, because of the excessive increase in fragility. We had it..lol...because my brother in law was one of the pathologists. In essence, it is not 100 percent Silver Queen as it is much more fragile, but it is of the original strain and has not been named otherwise, since it was never distributed, but the mutation did keep a great deal of the inherence of the hybrid. We've had many weird "experimental" veggies in our garden over the years, from what I would call a peppermato(a bell peppery ambienced tomato that didn't quite cut it, because of a thickened, fleshy tough skin)to a many knobbed carrot -radish. We also had some of the first Yukon Gold potatoes as well as a blue potato, the name which escapes me. You don't wanna know about all the houseplants, trees , grasses and even kudzu, that have been tried out on our property.(but I always had the most unusual plant projects in school) There is very little of it left, my guess is that within the next couple years , I'll run out of viable ones altogether. As it is now, I only had 7 stalks that produced this year and only a couple of ears on each, so it does seem to be weakening in reproductive abilities, greatly. So yes you are right, and I'm right
#35
Cakes
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RE: the best corn on the cob 2004/09/23 08:37:53 (permalink)
Very interesting, redtressed.

My grandfather's second wife's daughter's husband (how's that for shirt tail?)taught ag at SDSU and then worked for Sakoda, a seed corn company. That is where my limited knowledge comes from.

Cakes
#36
ocdreamr
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RE: the best corn on the cob 2004/09/23 09:48:45 (permalink)
Best corn I ever had was back in the 70's. I was living up in the country. A local Dairy farmer turned over one of his roadside fields to his son & daughter. They would plant it with corn every year. When the corn was ready they would set up a couple of chairs by the side of the road & wait. I would pull up, roll my window down & tell them how much I wanted. They would head into the field picking as they went. Money & corn would be exchanged through the window & off I would go. I only lived about a half mile down the road, so it didn't take long to get home. I'd put the water on first & by the time it was boiling the corn would be shucked. Alas the kids have grown & a church now stands in that field, but what great memories of wonderful corn.
#37
alesrus
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RE: the best corn on the cob 2004/09/23 10:58:56 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by seafarer john

Garlic and cilantro on fresh corn on the cob? The man ought to be arrested!!!

The World's best fresh corn is grown right here in New Paltz, New York. ..... - no other place in the world can boast such great fresh corn on the cob.



Eat your hearts out ,the rest of you poor folks who will never know corn in its perfect state...

Cheers, John


Sorry Seafarer John, Two words for you JERSEY CORN
#38
seafarer john
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RE: the best corn on the cob 2004/09/23 12:05:12 (permalink)
The only good thing I can say for Jersey corn is that it is on the market two weeks before we have any of the World's Greatest Corn here in the Walkill valley.

Cheers, John
#39
Emilyparis
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RE: the best corn on the cob 2004/09/23 16:09:54 (permalink)
hi again and thanks for all of your comments,

Really the French are weird, in answer to MichaelGemmell, the only people who seem to really love corn here are the Africans. They set up these strange little stands in shopping carts, and cook it over charcoal, other ethnic groups do chestnuts, and it's really interesting but tough (cow corn, for the livestock in my opinion, but still better than nothing), however, it's not the butter and sugar I was brought up with...otherwise we do have corn at KFC but once again the really tough yellow kind.

Perhaps I will go on a photo this weekend of all the corn cobs on the street outside of the KFC at Chateau Rouge. V V interesting from a cultural perspective
#40
Goose
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RE: the best corn on the cob 2004/09/23 16:28:51 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by redtressed

I still raise Silver Queen, using the offspring of the seeds we have saved every harvest since I was a little girl, not by purchasing new. I also grow Ambrosia, Milk and Honey, and Pontiac Yellow, which is not as sweet and good to use for freezing whole cobs for consumption in the winter(doesn't get as hard and starchy). I generally either steam corn or grill it in the husk. As for accoutrements, for Ambrosia and Milk and Honey....it absolutely needs none. For yellow corn, I either use a spray butter, or make a butter flavored with seasoned salt and Tennessee Sunshine sauce(a vinegar based hot sauce with large flakes of pepper in it)


do you sew your own clothes, and churn your own butter as well?
#41
redtressed
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RE: the best corn on the cob 2004/09/23 16:56:35 (permalink)
quote:
Goose Posted - 09/23/2004 : 16:28:51
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

quote:
Originally posted by redtressed

I still raise Silver Queen, using the offspring of the seeds we have saved every harvest since I was a little girl, not by purchasing new. I also grow Ambrosia, Milk and Honey, and Pontiac Yellow, which is not as sweet and good to use for freezing whole cobs for consumption in the winter(doesn't get as hard and starchy). I generally either steam corn or grill it in the husk. As for accoutrements, for Ambrosia and Milk and Honey....it absolutely needs none. For yellow corn, I either use a spray butter, or make a butter flavored with seasoned salt and Tennessee Sunshine sauce(a vinegar based hot sauce with large flakes of pepper in it)



do you sew your own clothes, and churn your own butter as well?



When the mood strikes.....uh huh. I have a 1869 butter churn but rarely employ it for such....tis just as easy to make butter in a glass jar. As far as the sewing...I did a good deal of the sewing and creation of costumes for the WVU Drama Department back in the dark ages and won the blue ribbon in state competition in 4-H, back before time began. Want me to sew the rip up in the seat of your britches?
#42
snoby
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RE: the best corn on the cob 2004/09/23 17:37:29 (permalink)
A freind of mine was steeming clams over beer. I put some corn on the cob on top of the clams, when the clams were done so was the corn. Boy, they came out real good. Fill a pot with 3/4 clam juice and 1/4 beer and boil the corn til its done. It tastes almost as good.
#43
EdSails
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RE: the best corn on the cob 2004/09/23 18:18:11 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by snoby

A freind of mine was steeming clams over beer. I put some corn on the cob on top of the clams, when the clams were done so was the corn. Boy, they came out real good. Fill a pot with 3/4 clam juice and 1/4 beer and boil the corn til its done. It tastes almost as good.


Yum!
#44
seafarer john
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RE: the best corn on the cob 2004/09/24 12:57:38 (permalink)
Snoby: That's almost what we call a clambake.

Cheers, john
#45
Goose
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RE: the best corn on the cob 2004/09/24 13:11:22 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by redtressed

quote:
Goose Posted - 09/23/2004 : 16:28:51
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

quote:
Originally posted by redtressed

I still raise Silver Queen, using the offspring of the seeds we have saved every harvest since I was a little girl, not by purchasing new. I also grow Ambrosia, Milk and Honey, and Pontiac Yellow, which is not as sweet and good to use for freezing whole cobs for consumption in the winter(doesn't get as hard and starchy). I generally either steam corn or grill it in the husk. As for accoutrements, for Ambrosia and Milk and Honey....it absolutely needs none. For yellow corn, I either use a spray butter, or make a butter flavored with seasoned salt and Tennessee Sunshine sauce(a vinegar based hot sauce with large flakes of pepper in it)



do you sew your own clothes, and churn your own butter as well?



When the mood strikes.....uh huh. I have a 1869 butter churn but rarely employ it for such....tis just as easy to make butter in a glass jar. As far as the sewing...I did a good deal of the sewing and creation of costumes for the WVU Drama Department back in the dark ages and won the blue ribbon in state competition in 4-H, back before time began. Want me to sew the rip up in the seat of your britches?


so you can enter the "earth mother of the year contest", right?
#46
redtressed
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RE: the best corn on the cob 2004/09/24 16:05:27 (permalink)
well..yeah...and it's danged economical....and that's me........the econo-queen, not to be confused with the EconoLodge Queen.
#47
leslie1787
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RE: the best corn on the cob 2004/09/27 18:50:13 (permalink)
Redtressed. Where or who makes Tennessee Sunshine? I've never seen it in the store and I'm from Tenn.
Cakes. I remember that my mom did the same thing, start the water to boil before we went to pick. Sure wish I had room or time for a garden now.
#48
leslie1787
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RE: the best corn on the cob 2004/09/27 18:52:48 (permalink)
I've scanned this thread and I haven't seen reference to fried corn. I love me some fried corn. Does anyone do that? How about a recipe?
#49
EdSails
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RE: the best corn on the cob 2004/09/27 19:02:48 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by leslie1787

I've scanned this thread and I haven't seen reference to fried corn. I love me some fried corn. Does anyone do that? How about a recipe?


Back on the first page of this thread I started a discussion of deep-fried corn. It's good stuff!
#50
carlton pierre
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RE: the best corn on the cob 2004/10/01 14:23:02 (permalink)
Is there such a thing as bad corn? I'll eat it right out of the can. For fresh corn I love it boiled for five or ten minutes, or I like it on the grill.
When I was in Pakistan little kids would run up to the trains when they stopped and sell grilled ears of corn and they were excellent that way.

carl reitz
#51
Rusty246
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RE: the best corn on the cob 2004/10/01 14:40:40 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by leslie1787

Redtressed. Where or who makes Tennessee Sunshine? I've never seen it in the store and I'm from Tenn.
Cakes. I remember that my mom did the same thing, start the water to boil before we went to pick. Sure wish I had room or time for a garden now.


I like it as well and it's Luzianne that makes it!
#52
Rusty246
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RE: the best corn on the cob 2004/10/01 14:52:08 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by Rusty246

quote:
Originally posted by leslie1787

Redtressed. Where or who makes Tennessee Sunshine? I've never seen it in the store and I'm from Tenn.
Cakes. I remember that my mom did the same thing, start the water to boil before we went to pick. Sure wish I had room or time for a garden now.


I like it as well and it's Luzianne that makes it!

Luzianne makes Tennessee Sunshine, sorry it's Friday and I'm ready to go. Andyes, I like it especially on oysters.
#53
Rusty246
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RE: the best corn on the cob 2004/10/01 15:00:15 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by michaelgemmell

Emily, one of the things that confounds me about the French (and I'm 1/4 myself) is their rejection of corn as human food. It tends to suggest that instead of being epicures--not afraid to try any food obviously wholesome--that some French, at least, are just food snobs. Gee, they'd fit right in here in San Francisco! Please see if you can find sweet corn and make it for your friends.

Aren't we all lucky enough to live where our favorite varieties are grown? Science indeed is responsible for corn that will stay sweet after harvest, and, frankly, some is better, but I like it all. For that matter, what's with my fellow Californians shucking the corn in the grocery store? Nature provided corn with a wrapper that helps keep it fresh. Why leave that wrapper at the store? You're paying by the ear, not the pound, so why bring home corn that's turning stale as you pay for it?

I shuck and silk it, trim the bottom (get every last bit of the husk off now!) and put it in a large kettle of cold water--nothing else. Put on the lid, bring to a boil, then turn off the flame. Leave the lid on and wait 20 minutes for corn that's perfectly cooked every time. Wait a little longer and it will still not get overcooked. I melt butter, pour it into a corn dish and roll the ear in it, which is less messy and wasteful than cold butter from the fridge.

Friends in Iowa in mid-August simply soaked the unshucked corn in cold water for two minutes, then grilled. They removed the husk and silk afterwards, with one quick motion--all silk gone. Delicious!

Muppets corn is shucked and washed. Mix a package of Knorr (not Lipton, it's too salty) onion soup mix into 1/2 pound softened UNsalted butter. Spread thickly on the corn, wrap individually in foil and grill. Oops, I don't remember for how long! This works baking it in the oven, too. When you unwrap it, it's buttered and salted.

An old Midwestern trick is to put a little peanut butter on the corn after butter and before salt. A LITTLE! It just makes it taste sweeter somehow. Once I stretched the Muppets butter mix with peanut butter. No one noticed the peanut butter taste but all kept complimenting me on the very sweet corn.

Forget those plastic corn holders with the nails embedded, they never last. Williams-Sonoma sells stainless steel cornholders, and they're as strong as--stainless steel! They're not cheap, but they should last forever.

I just asked my partner if he'd go to the store--for corn! He said no. Alas!


I have to try the onion soup/butter method that sounds REALLY good! As for your partner not getting the corn, do him as my brother did me about kool-aid when we were kids, he'd ask me to make it, I'd say "no, you make it". He said: "If I make it you won't get any!" Nuff said. You go get the corn.....
#54
RubyRose
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RE: the best corn on the cob 2004/10/01 16:37:29 (permalink)
I just go up to the local cornstand and they only have three signs to last through the entire season - Yellow Corn, White Corn and Bi-color Corn. The varieties under the sign or signs change with the weeks but they're always good if we have enough rain.

I eat it grilled, creamed, fried with bacon drippings and onion, mixed with fresh baby Fordhook lima beans and also dishes like corn pudding, corn fritters, etc. But I like it microwaved best and served with butter, salt & pepper. For me, microwaving has replaced the boiling or steaming method when I'm only making a couple of ears at a time.
#55
seafarer john
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RE: the best corn on the cob 2004/10/01 16:55:06 (permalink)
Do you microwave it in the husk, unhusked, wrapped in something, How????

cheers, John
#56
plb
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RE: the best corn on the cob 2004/10/01 17:42:59 (permalink)
John,

Way up in this thread I recommended wrapping the corn in plastic wrap and poking a few holes in it. I think this method concentrates the flavor in the corn, by not dissipating it in the water or steam. However, one reader seemed offended by the unP.C.ness of using a microwave at all.

I would think leaving it in the husks would give the same effect, but would probably waste power by cooking the husks as well.
#57
Michael Hoffman
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RE: the best corn on the cob 2004/10/01 19:24:26 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by leslie1787

Redtressed. Where or who makes Tennessee Sunshine? I've never seen it in the store and I'm from Tenn.
Cakes. I remember that my mom did the same thing, start the water to boil before we went to pick. Sure wish I had room or time for a garden now.

Kroger has Tennessee Sunshine. At least, they do in Ohio. They also have Cajun Sunshine and several other Sunshines, all made by the same company.
#58
RubyRose
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RE: the best corn on the cob 2004/10/01 20:00:05 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by seafarer john

Do you microwave it in the husk, unhusked, wrapped in something, How????

cheers, John

About 10 years ago, I got this hard plastic container with two indentations the size of corn ears and a lighter weight plastic lid. I just stick the husked ears in it and put in the microwave for about 2 minutes, then turn and cook for about 2 minutes more. You could do it in any loosely covered microwaveable container. If I've had the corn for more than a few hours, I add a teaspoon or two of water.

I am not a fan of microwaves for other than melting butter, etc. but I think they shine when it comes to maintaining the natural taste of vegetables like asparagus and broccoli or for precooking ones like winter squashes or eggplant.
#59
hermitt4d
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RE: the best corn on the cob 2004/10/09 19:03:31 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by redtressed

quote:
Goose Posted - 09/23/2004 : 16:28:51
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

quote:
Originally posted by redtressed

I still raise Silver Queen, using the offspring of the seeds we have saved every harvest since I was a little girl, not by purchasing new. I also grow Ambrosia, Milk and Honey, and Pontiac Yellow, which is not as sweet and good to use for freezing whole cobs for consumption in the winter(doesn't get as hard and starchy). I generally either steam corn or grill it in the husk. As for accoutrements, for Ambrosia and Milk and Honey....it absolutely needs none. For yellow corn, I either use a spray butter, or make a butter flavored with seasoned salt and Tennessee Sunshine sauce(a vinegar based hot sauce with large flakes of pepper in it)



do you sew your own clothes, and churn your own butter as well?



When the mood strikes.....uh huh. I have a 1869 butter churn but rarely employ it for such....tis just as easy to make butter in a glass jar. As far as the sewing...I did a good deal of the sewing and creation of costumes for the WVU Drama Department back in the dark ages and won the blue ribbon in state competition in 4-H, back before time began. Want me to sew the rip up in the seat of your britches?

redtressed: I have recently been thinking about doing this (making my own butter, not sewing up the seat of goose's pants). What kind of churn do you have? how long does it take? How long does it keep?
#60
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