The most memorable local eateries along the highways and back roads of America
Sign In | Register for Free!
Restaurants Recipes Forums EatingTours Merchandise FAQ Maps Insider
Forum Themes:
Welcome !

 International Road and Off-Road Food

Author Message
EatingTheRoad

  • Total Posts: 1205
  • Joined: 8/30/2009
  • Location: Santa Fe, NM
International Road and Off-Road Food Fri, 11/13/09 3:47 PM (permalink)
I found some pictures of some roadfood and off-road places from across the world. Even some riverfood

I've never eaten at something quite like this. The most extreme I've eaten at was maybe just a market or a bazaar. What's the craziest thing or place you've eaten at internationally?
























 
#1
    mar52

    • Total Posts: 7598
    • Joined: 4/17/2005
    • Location: Marina del Rey, CA
    Re:International Road and Off-Road Food Fri, 11/13/09 4:00 PM (permalink)
    I've eaten huge clams off of a cart in Tijuana.

    Once.

    I always eat the street tacos there and only had food poisoning once.

    NEVER say  "salsa avocate, por favor"
     
    #2
      Davydd

      • Total Posts: 6222
      • Joined: 4/24/2005
      • Location: Tonka Bay, MN
      Re:International Road and Off-Road Food Fri, 11/13/09 4:07 PM (permalink)
      Saltenas in the heart of Cochabamba, Bolivia.




       
      #3
        EatingTheRoad

        • Total Posts: 1205
        • Joined: 8/30/2009
        • Location: Santa Fe, NM
        Re:International Road and Off-Road Food Fri, 11/13/09 4:33 PM (permalink)

        Saltenas in the heart of Cochabamba, Bolivia.


        What exactly is that?
         
        #4
          quijote

          • Total Posts: 643
          • Joined: 12/22/2007
          • Location: Milwaukee, WI
          Re:International Road and Off-Road Food Fri, 11/13/09 10:45 PM (permalink)

          I've never eaten at something quite like this. The most extreme I've eaten at was maybe just a market or a bazaar. What's the craziest thing or place you've eaten at internationally?


          Over twenty years ago a buddy and I toured Morocco on the cheap for two weeks, and we ate all sorts of unidentified animal parts masquerading as kabobs and street food tagines. Amazingly, I only got sick once.

          A couple of years ago in Ecuador I enjoyed some roasted guinea pig (cuy) at a ramshackle site in the middle of the altiplano.

          In Paris last summer we ate at Ribouldingue, a restaurant that specializes in offal. It was possibly the most adventurous full-course meal I've ever had!

          http://restaurant-ribouldingue.com/ 
           
          #5
            EatingTheRoad

            • Total Posts: 1205
            • Joined: 8/30/2009
            • Location: Santa Fe, NM
            Re:International Road and Off-Road Food Sat, 11/14/09 7:21 AM (permalink)

            A couple of years ago in Ecuador I enjoyed some roasted guinea pig (cuy) at a ramshackle site in the middle of the altiplano.


            Were you aware when ordering that it was guinea pig?


            In Paris last summer we ate at Ribouldingue, a restaurant that specializes in offal. It was possibly the most adventurous full-course meal I've ever had!

            I've always wanted to try nicely prepared offal but it's hard to find 'round these part. I need to head to the South. I'm willing to try most anything.
             
            #6
              RodBangkok

              • Total Posts: 385
              • Joined: 10/12/2008
              • Location: Bangkok Thailand, XX
              Re:International Road and Off-Road Food Sat, 11/14/09 8:07 AM (permalink)

              Some of the pics just triggered my small rant so fee free to chime in:
              Food is all relative, wherever you go, in the US, you seem to like over-processed old food products that are artificially grown and stored to increase there shelf life.  Now having said that, perhaps you don't prefer it, but face it that's what you eat!  You have no problem picking up a completely sealed pack of chicken that you have no idea how old it is or where it came from, but it looks pretty under the colored lights at your mega mart, while at the same time you turn up your nose at any fresh market where you can touch......yes touch, and feel the texture of the skin or pick it up and God forbid smell it.  Food is what you like, what you grew up with, and what you know is good based on the training your parents provided, IMHO the last is something that is totally lacking in most Americans today, instead you've been brainwashed with this food safety line, that I suppose goes well when you can't buy food from the source, but must rely on such old food that it can become dangerous with only the slightest amount of exposure. 
              Anyway no flames intended, just an old American that has thankfully stayed clear of US and its quirks for the past 20 some years.  Do yourself a favor and when you see any of the above in the pics being served during your vacation trip, look for places that have a lot of locals, go for it, they know food and that's your best best take on where to eat.   s



               
              #7
                EatingTheRoad

                • Total Posts: 1205
                • Joined: 8/30/2009
                • Location: Santa Fe, NM
                Re:International Road and Off-Road Food Sat, 11/14/09 8:51 AM (permalink)
                RodBangkok


                Some of the pics just triggered my small rant so fee free to chime in:
                Food is all relative, wherever you go, in the US, you seem to like over-processed old food products that are artificially grown and stored to increase there shelf life.  Now having said that, perhaps you don't prefer it, but face it that's what you eat!  You have no problem picking up a completely sealed pack of chicken that you have no idea how old it is or where it came from, but it looks pretty under the colored lights at your mega mart, while at the same time you turn up your nose at any fresh market where you can touch......yes touch, and feel the texture of the skin or pick it up and God forbid smell it.  Food is what you like, what you grew up with, and what you know is good based on the training your parents provided, IMHO the last is something that is totally lacking in most Americans today, instead you've been brainwashed with this food safety line, that I suppose goes well when you can't buy food from the source, but must rely on such old food that it can become dangerous with only the slightest amount of exposure. 
                Anyway no flames intended, just an old American that has thankfully stayed clear of US and its quirks for the past 20 some years.  Do yourself a favor and when you see any of the above in the pics being served during your vacation trip, look for places that have a lot of locals, go for it, they know food and that's your best best take on where to eat.   s


                Very well said. I was not all intending to put these places down...I was merely fascinated by them...it's true Roadfood! I would love to try foods like this. One of my favorite places to eat is markets and bazaars. I just haven't had the opportunity to get to places like the above. I bet the food is delicious and like you mention is probably much fresher (not to mention safer). Didn't we just have half a million pounds of ground beef recalled two weeks ago? http://www.wkbw.com/news/local/68946647.html

                A lot of people don't realize the tricks supermarkets (and meat packers) use to deliver "fresh" meat:
                http://www.nytimes.com/20...ional/21meat.html?_r=1



                If some of the meat in supermarkets is looking rosier than it used to, the reason is that a growing number of markets are selling it in airtight packages treated with a touch of carbon monoxide to help the product stay red for weeks.

                This form of "modified atmosphere packaging," a technique in which other gases replace oxygen, has become more widely used as supermarkets eliminate their butchers and buy precut, "case-ready" meat from processing plants.


                I think people (Americans) need to be more informed about what goes into bringing them their food. I've been watching a BBC show called Britain's Most Disgusting Foods ( http://www.thelondonpaper...-most-disgusting-foods ) and it's truly astounding what some of the things in supermarkets have gone through. Chicken Kieve with 10% actual chicken. Cheese "Product" (think Kraft Singles) with 6% actual cheese. So little that they don't even have cheese in the name, they're just called Singles. That's not to mention the mechanically separated meat ( http://en.wikipedia.org/w...nically_separated_meat ). This could go on and on about trans fats, high-fructose corn syrup, palm oil, etc.

                I would be honored to eat like a lot of other countries do...sadly our food distribution is set up this way for a reason.

                You rant is much appreciated
                 
                #8
                  quijote

                  • Total Posts: 643
                  • Joined: 12/22/2007
                  • Location: Milwaukee, WI
                  Re:International Road and Off-Road Food Sat, 11/14/09 9:48 AM (permalink)
                  I rather enjoyed the pics and felt they celebrate the wonderful possibilities and diversity of world cuisines. It's true that what's "exotic" to some people is "mundane" to others, so I would expect a thread like this to generate a variety of responses. I agree with ETR that the food in the pics looks great, and it's true Roadfood. I'd love to be able to chow down on some of things right now.
                   
                  #9
                    quijote

                    • Total Posts: 643
                    • Joined: 12/22/2007
                    • Location: Milwaukee, WI
                    Re:International Road and Off-Road Food Sat, 11/14/09 9:56 AM (permalink)



                    A couple of years ago in Ecuador I enjoyed some roasted guinea pig (cuy) at a ramshackle site in the middle of the altiplano.


                    Were you aware when ordering that it was guinea pig?

                     
                    Oh, yes, that was part of the point. Guinea pig is an ancient food among many Andean peoples, and before the Spanish Conquest, it was considered a food for the upper echelons of society. I thought it was delicious. The potatoes and corn we had were also outstanding.


                    In Paris last summer we ate at Ribouldingue, a restaurant that specializes in offal. It was possibly the most adventurous full-course meal I've ever had!

                    I've always wanted to try nicely prepared offal but it's hard to find 'round these part. I need to head to the South. I'm willing to try most anything.

                     
                    Aside from this meal, I have very little experience with offal. Some things at this meal I really liked--lambs brains, braised beef cheeks, stewed omasum, etc. Other things, like pig snout and pig's ear, I didn't much care for. Before this meal, I'd had tripe (in menudo), sweetbreads, and other, more common things, but this meal really let me see another dimension of food rarely available in the U.S.
                     
                    #10
                      EatingTheRoad

                      • Total Posts: 1205
                      • Joined: 8/30/2009
                      • Location: Santa Fe, NM
                      Re:International Road and Off-Road Food Sat, 11/14/09 10:14 AM (permalink)

                      Aside from this meal, I have very little experience with offal. Some things at this meal I really liked--lambs brains, braised beef cheeks, stewed omasum, etc. Other things, like pig snout and pig's ear, I didn't much care for. Before this meal, I'd had tripe (in menudo), sweetbreads, and other, more common things, but this meal really let me see another dimension of food rarely available in the U.S.


                      Was it the textures that made you dislike the pig snout and ear?
                       
                      #11
                        jimcfs1

                        • Total Posts: 71
                        • Joined: 6/19/2007
                        • Location: Athens, WV
                        Re:International Road and Off-Road Food Sat, 11/14/09 10:18 AM (permalink)
                        EatingTheRoad



                        You rant is much appreciated


                        Ditto from me!  Food was a lot better 20 years ago before the food companies discovered they could add crap to it, people would still eat it (and in fact eat MORE), and make much more $$$ from it. 

                        If you notice, there's a strong movement in this country now demanding either organic or more pure ingredients in food.   For example, the local Kroger here in southern WV went from no organic/healther food section several years ago to a complete section with its own cooler and freezer case.  We are a very small market compared to the bigger cities and Kroger is doing it.  It will take many years, but the food supply will start coming back around.
                         
                        #12
                          Davydd

                          • Total Posts: 6222
                          • Joined: 4/24/2005
                          • Location: Tonka Bay, MN
                          Re:International Road and Off-Road Food Sat, 11/14/09 10:54 AM (permalink)
                          EatingTheRoad



                          Saltenas in the heart of Cochabamba, Bolivia.


                          What exactly is that?


                          Saltenas are the Bolivian version of empanadas. It has meat and potatoes and what you see in the photo is a broken apart saltena showing a hard-boiled quail egg that is traditionally placed in the center.
                           
                          #13
                            carolina bob

                            • Total Posts: 3420
                            • Joined: 1/1/2005
                            • Location: Chicagoland
                            Re:International Road and Off-Road Food Sat, 11/14/09 12:25 PM (permalink)
                            I had a hamburger at a Harvey's outlet in Toronto once. Does that count?  
                                                                       www.harveys.ca
                             
                            #14
                              quijote

                              • Total Posts: 643
                              • Joined: 12/22/2007
                              • Location: Milwaukee, WI
                              Re:International Road and Off-Road Food Sat, 11/28/09 12:01 AM (permalink)
                              EatingTheRoad



                              Aside from this meal, I have very little experience with offal. Some things at this meal I really liked--lambs brains, braised beef cheeks, stewed omasum, etc. Other things, like pig snout and pig's ear, I didn't much care for. Before this meal, I'd had tripe (in menudo), sweetbreads, and other, more common things, but this meal really let me see another dimension of food rarely available in the U.S.


                              Was it the textures that made you dislike the pig snout and ear?

                               
                              Yeah, the texture for both was an issue, but flavor was a factor, as well. The snout was very blubbery, but also very bland (even with spices). The ear was chewy and didn't have much else going on.  

                               
                              #15
                                quijote

                                • Total Posts: 643
                                • Joined: 12/22/2007
                                • Location: Milwaukee, WI
                                Re:International Road and Off-Road Food Sat, 11/28/09 12:02 AM (permalink)
                                nocarolina


                                I had a hamburger at a Harvey's outlet in Toronto once. Does that count?  
                                                                           www.harveys.ca

                                 
                                Depends on what was in it.....

                                 
                                #16
                                  coolaunt

                                  • Total Posts: 10
                                  • Joined: 7/18/2011
                                  • Location: Manila, XX
                                  Re:International Road and Off-Road Food Mon, 07/18/11 10:15 PM (permalink)
                                  I just had goat yesterday. Now I could normally eat goat (well not normally, I think it's mostly cooked for special occasions) but since my uncle sent us some that wasn't all chopped up and ready to go, I had the chance to try the eye. Took a little while for me to eat it but thanks to a watching a few seasons of No Reservations, I did it and it was good. Kind of like marrow.
                                   
                                  It'll take a while til I try it again though.
                                   
                                  I don't think I've eaten anything unusual abroad seeing as I've only been to the US, Hong Kong, and Australia. Plus, our own cuisine can get pretty exotic as it is. :)
                                   
                                  <message edited by coolaunt on Mon, 07/18/11 10:17 PM>
                                   
                                  #17
                                    bhollen76

                                    • Total Posts: 1
                                    • Joined: 1/3/2012
                                    • Location: falls church, FL
                                    Re:International Road and Off-Road Food Tue, 01/3/12 11:40 PM (permalink)
                                    I'm little scared to eat from those kind of places because it's not good for my health.I ran across this new Beverages report today.  It might be of interest - I found it at me know your thoughts.
                                     
                                    #18
                                      Online Bookmarks Sharing: Share/Bookmark

                                      Jump to:

                                      Current active users

                                      There are 0 members and 2 guests.

                                      Icon Legend and Permission

                                      • New Messages
                                      • No New Messages
                                      • Hot Topic w/ New Messages
                                      • Hot Topic w/o New Messages
                                      • Locked w/ New Messages
                                      • Locked w/o New Messages
                                      • Read Message
                                      • Post New Thread
                                      • Reply to message
                                      • Post New Poll
                                      • Submit Vote
                                      • Post reward post
                                      • Delete my own posts
                                      • Delete my own threads
                                      • Rate post

                                      2000-2014 ASPPlayground.NET Forum Version 3.9
                                      What is Roadfood?  |   Privacy Policy  |   Contact Roadfood.com   Copyright 2011 - Roadfood.com