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the ancient mariner

  • Total Posts: 3987
  • Joined: 4/6/2004
  • Location: st petersburg, florida
breakfast Mon, 06/21/04 6:15 PM (permalink)
Having spent every summer on a farm, breakfast was the meal that followed chores. Milking was #1, storing the milk #2, cleaning up #3, loading the truck to deliver the previous day's milking #4---then came breakfast. It was eggs, as many as you wanted, pork chops, or sausage or bacon, and lots of home fries and homemade bread and coffee. Lots and lots of everything for a kid growing up. Then drinking lots of buttermilk all morning while delivering. No stuff that goes into a toaster oven or micro-wave.
 
#1
    Jennie

    • Total Posts: 389
    • Joined: 8/31/2003
    • Location: Mt. Airy, MD
    RE: breakfast Mon, 06/21/04 6:55 PM (permalink)
    My husband is from the Deep South. Of England. (And loves grits, btw.)

    For several years during adolescence, he spent his summers on his great uncle's dairy farm in Cornwall. He has fond memories of breakfasts on that farm, in probably the mid to late 1960s. His aunt would go out with a pitcher and scoop ice cold milk fresh from the chiller. Cream would go in a pan which sat continually on one of the back burners of her huge Aga stove. There were always huge pots of clotted cream on the table. Thick and bright yellow, it was absolutely fabulous, and his great aunt made it by the half-gallon. She made breakfast for all the farmhands and family (about 10 guys), served on a huge ancient farm table, which probably would have been considered an antique if it wasn't so beat up. A traditional full English breakfast, which consisted of bacon, fried eggs, homemade sausages, fried bread, fried tomatoes, fried mushrooms (all in bacon fat), tea, cornflakes, rice crispies or Weetabix (the only cereals available) with fresh milk straight from the chiller (virtually yellow) or clotted cream, and rack upon rack of toast.

    Ahh. I can feel my arteries slamming shut just thinking about it. But it sounds so nice. Hubby wants an Aga stove now.
     
    #2
      the ancient mariner

      • Total Posts: 3987
      • Joined: 4/6/2004
      • Location: st petersburg, florida
      RE: breakfast Tue, 06/22/04 7:10 AM (permalink)
      Jennie----sounds like the breakfast my mother cooked. Fantastic !! I remember her spooning bacon fat over the frying eggs to cook the yoke. Tip the big old iron frying pan to get the bacon fat deep enough to scope it up. Big globs of butter on home made bread. Boy was that good stuff. It got to her though, she had a stroke at 96 while having breakfast of two boiled eggs. When the doctor at the hospital asked who her regular physician was my brother said " she has not been to a Doctor in 40 years ". She just ate what she liked and had a glass of wine every afternoon to "keep the motor running".
       
      #3
        fcbaldwin

        • Total Posts: 388
        • Joined: 3/8/2004
        • Location: Powhatan, VA
        RE: breakfast Tue, 06/22/04 10:07 AM (permalink)
        Breakfasts while growing up during the summer on the Chesapeake Bay. My family had an old beach cottage where we would often stay the entire summer. My Mother would make these huge breakfasts on weekend mornings: on the big dining room table would be platters of fresh sliced canteloupe and honey dew melons, fried green (and sometimes ripe) tomatoes, scrambled eggs, fried salt-cured fish (I think herring), bacon/sausage/ham, homemade biscuits, and big bowls of grits with butter melting and swirling on top, accompanied by pitchers of orange juice and ice water.

        Frank
        PS: What's an Aga stove?
         
        #4
          the ancient mariner

          • Total Posts: 3987
          • Joined: 4/6/2004
          • Location: st petersburg, florida
          RE: breakfast Wed, 06/23/04 7:56 AM (permalink)
          I was wondering, while reading your post, if the brunch business started with mothers making fantastic Sunday morning meals. Being Catholic we were not allowed to eat anything after midnight on Saturday night until we got home from 9am Mass. Mom would go to 730 Mass and as soon as she got home would put her apron on and head for the kitchen. When the rest of the starving family got home about 10:30 the feast was ready. But on the way home we would stop in the bakery for the hard rolls (to be covered with a mound of butter) and a coffee cake---round with a hole in the middle and covered with icing. Man those were good days.

          PS---An Aga stove is a big ol'monster that is manufactured in Europe, cost a fortune now.
           
          #5
            6star

            • Total Posts: 4388
            • Joined: 1/28/2004
            • Location: West Peoria, IL
            RE: breakfast Wed, 06/23/04 9:23 AM (permalink)
            quote:
            Originally posted by fcbaldwin




            PS: What's an Aga stove?


            Here is a website with a picture of one: http://www.mrsdutoit.com/pmach/weblogpv.php?id=785_0_1_0
             
            #6
              kland01s

              • Total Posts: 2835
              • Joined: 3/14/2003
              • Location: Fox River Valley, IL
              RE: breakfast Wed, 06/23/04 11:13 AM (permalink)
              In college in the '60's, I worked wheat harvest in North Dakota which went 24 hours when the weather was good. I remember coming in from the fields at 5 or 6 am to a huge spread of all kinds of food but what I remember most of all was the men drinking tomato juice and beer for an eye opener.
               
              #7
                Cakes

                • Total Posts: 562
                • Joined: 9/11/2003
                • Location: Sarasota, FL
                RE: breakfast Wed, 06/23/04 11:20 AM (permalink)
                quote:
                Originally posted by 6star

                quote:
                Originally posted by fcbaldwin




                PS: What's an Aga stove?


                Here is a website with a picture of one: http://www.mrsdutoit.com/pmach/weblogpv.php?id=785_0_1_0


                If it is so efficient, then why do people want to gather around it during cooler months?

                I live in Florida, I don't want one.
                 
                #8
                  Jennie

                  • Total Posts: 389
                  • Joined: 8/31/2003
                  • Location: Mt. Airy, MD
                  RE: breakfast Fri, 06/25/04 1:23 PM (permalink)
                  quote:
                  Originally posted by the ancient mariner

                  It got to her though, she had a stroke at 96 while having breakfast of two boiled eggs.


                  On the other hand, 96 years is pretty good innings. May we all live so long!

                  Aga stoves: http://www.agaweb02.agalinks.com/agal/agaContent?GUEST_ID=5923

                  This is their gallery: http://www.agaweb02.agalinks.com/agal/agaContent?FRAMESET_ID=7725

                  You buy them by the number of ovens. This is a quote from their "How it Works" page:

                  Beneath the classic looks of every Aga is a heart of cast iron: the entire cooker is an outstandingly efficient energy store, steadily transferring the heat from its core into its ovens and hotplates. An Aga is always ready to cook instantly and there are no switches and dials because the Aga looks after itself. Thermostatic control maintains consistent temperatures while high levels of insulation within the outer casing and beneath the Hotplate covers ensure that every Aga uses fuel economically. The Aga releases a
                  unique source of gentle, friendly warmth into your kitchen.


                  And from their FAQ page:

                  The Aga was designed by a Gustav Dalen, whose sole aim in inventing this cooker was to conserve energy and fuel and to maximise efficiency. When the Aga is assembled it has 16 cubic feet of vermiculite, a natural insulation material, poured into its interior. (Electric economy 7 Aga owners are a little different; their model has ceramic insulation)

                  The Aga is also manufactured from cast iron, renown for its heat retention. The heat source to an Aga is comparatively small, for instance the gas Aga runs from a burner about the same rating as one conventional gas hotplate burner. The Aga is automatically controlled by a thermostat.


                  Hubby wants one when we retire to the UK eventually.
                   
                  #9
                    the ancient mariner

                    • Total Posts: 3987
                    • Joined: 4/6/2004
                    • Location: st petersburg, florida
                    RE: breakfast Thu, 07/1/04 5:51 PM (permalink)
                    This topic went from breakfast to the range it is cooked on. I have had breakfast cooked on a lot of different stoves, ranges, cooktops, camp-fires, etc., and it really doesn't make much difference. My Mom cooked on a great big, cast iron, coal stove with a flat top. On that top was always simmering----the "soup de jour" mostly left overs from the supper of the previous night. The " tea kettle" ready at the arrival of any soul with a thirst. And over night the oatmeal. Oatmeal cooked slowly all night, but devoured quickly in the morning. The slow cooking oven part of the range might find a roast chicken or a fantastic apple pie. Or both. And the thing heated half the house at the same time. Talk about efficiency.





                     
                    #10
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