turkey soup novice

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NYNM
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2006/11/24 15:29:51 (permalink)

turkey soup novice

OK, I admit it, its the day after Thanksgiving and I don't know what to do with the carcass to make turkey soup/broth, etc. What do you do? Like just put the bones in a pot with water? Help!!
#1

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    BhamBabe
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    RE: turkey soup novice 2006/11/24 15:48:03 (permalink)
    This is by no means the only way, but this is my way lol

    I break the bones and put them in a roasting pan and roast them. I had to run get my notes, 500 degrees for 35 mins. Then I transfer that to a stock pot, making sure I add a bit of water to the roasting pan to get the goody out of the bottom. I then add just enough water to cover plus 2 inches. To the pot I add carrots, celery, peppercorns, onions chopped coarsely, about 3 cloves of garlic, and a couple of bay leaves.

    Bring to a soft boil, turn down the heat to simmer and skim the scum off the top. I let it simmer for about 3-5 hours, depending on what I'm doing. Once done I set a colander into a big bowl and pour the whole contents through it. Pull all the meat off the bones and discard peppercorns, bones and veggies. You can make a bouquet garni to make removal of peppercorns and such easier. Just tie them up in cheesecloth and throw in the pot.

    Once strained I put the broth and meat back in the pot, add any veggies and simmer on low for 2 hours. Or like today, I let simmer a bit then add rice, then broccoli when the rice is nearly done. Salt to taste and enjoy :-) I serve mine with either cheddar cheese yeast rolls or corn muffins.

    I also know some folks who put in leftover stuffing or dressing and mashed potatoes. It makes a creamy type soup.

    Sounds like a lot of work but it's really a hurry up and wait kind of thing. And your house smells lovely all day!
    #2
    GordonW
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    RE: turkey soup novice 2006/11/24 16:06:12 (permalink)
    Roast up the bones and make stock -- as good as it gets -- as in BBabe's post.

    Then use the stock and leftover meat, and wow them with turkey tetrazzini. Hit 'em where they least expect it.

    http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/recipe_views/views/13377
    #3
    CajunKing
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    RE: turkey soup novice 2006/11/24 16:25:26 (permalink)
    Bhambabe, I am on my way


    NYNM

    I usually just throw everything into my large stock pot (32 qt) add water enough too cover, carrots onions celery, garlic, pepper titch of salt, some bay leaves, thyme, sage.

    put it on low and leave it be for a while, skim the scum off now and then, and let it go 3-6 hours, then strain and pick the bones clean and add the meat back to the stock.

    I am making smoked turkey, roasted turkey, and ham stock as we speak. The house totally smells and it is such a great day today I have the windows open the neighbor came over and asked what we were cooking turkey day was over.

    I will freeze the stock i make and use it this winter in soups.
    #4
    Jimeats
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    RE: turkey soup novice 2006/11/25 07:59:28 (permalink)
    This is the first time I've heard about roasting the carcus. Is there any aditional benifit to doing it that way? The way I've always done it is throw it in a large stock pot, cover with water, seasonings and whatever vegtibles I have on hand and just let it go on the back of the wood stove.
    Chow Jim
    #5
    MilwFoodlovers
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    RE: turkey soup novice 2006/11/25 09:21:05 (permalink)
    Jim, roasting adds a depth of flavor you do not get by simply boiling.
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    fabulousoyster
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    RE: turkey soup novice 2006/11/25 09:30:18 (permalink)
    If you roast the carcass, the stock will be browner.

    You can make stock any way you like, like JimEats or Bhambabe, it will be delicious. My mother cracked and roasted the bones before boiling it up for 6 or more hours, straining and freezing it.

    She always browned pork and smoked ham bones before making stock.
    #7
    Trishkaidekaphobia
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    RE: turkey soup novice 2006/11/25 11:55:02 (permalink)
    Wow - that soup recipe sounds amazing! I can't wait until Christmas so I can be a turkey soup novice too. Canadian Thanksgiving takes place in October and I missed the (soup) boat on that one.

    Thanks for the inspiriation!
    #8
    Michael Hoffman
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    RE: turkey soup novice 2006/11/25 12:59:34 (permalink)
    I toss the carrots and onions in unpeeled. It adds another layer of rich flavor.
    #9
    fabulousoyster
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    RE: turkey soup novice 2006/11/25 15:58:02 (permalink)
    Canadian Thanksgiving, isn't there a Meat Pie that is made for the day? Please share the recipe!
    #10
    NYNM
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    RE: turkey soup novice 2006/11/25 18:14:36 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Michael Hoffman

    I toss the carrots and onions in unpeeled. It adds another layer of rich flavor.



    Hey guys I'm tryin' your ideas right now! And I'm doin' a little variant: I found some "tuscan spice" mix that I added to the soup along with "diet aroma" which is also ground spices imported from Italy, mainly sage. Ah, an Italian Leftovero Turkeo Zuppe!
    #11
    Trishkaidekaphobia
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    RE: turkey soup novice 2006/11/25 20:02:06 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by fabulousoyster

    Canadian Thanksgiving, isn't there a Meat Pie that is made for the day? Please share the recipe!


    Canadian Thanksgiving food is very similar to American. We have turkey, stuffing, and mashed potatoes. Vegetables like squash, brussels sprouts, green bean casserole, sweet potatoes are popular. Unless you make your own, Ocean Spray cranberry sauce is a staple. Stuffing recipes vary by cook, of course. We don't traditionally have things like candied yams, creamed onions, oyster stuffing. Pumpkin pie with whipped cream is a MUST!

    Fabulous, you're thinking of Tourtiére, which is a spciy pork meat pie in a flaky pastry. It's eaten in Quebec for Réveillon, known as Christmas Eve everywhere else. After Midnight Mass, families gather together for eating, drinking, opening gifts, games and storytelling. No matter what kind of food is served at Réveillon (and there is LOTS) Tourtiére is always a big part of it.

    The ingredients are basic - meat, onions, spices and pastry. This is a dish with historic roots and recipes are usually handed down. The only modern addition seems to be the use of ready-made, frozen puff pastry. I'm not French Canadian, so have never made it but have been to a couple of Réveillon celebrations and have had several versions of tourtiére - some less spicy, some more so. Most supermarkets also sell it at Christmas time - but it's never as good as homemade.

    Here's a link to a recipe that a friend has successfully used, if you're interested:

    http://www.canadianliving.com/canadianliving/client/en/Food/DetailRecipe.asp?idRe=3445

    Here is Alex Trebek's recipe:

    http://www.recipegoldmine.com/celeb/celeb72.htm

    Sorry, I didn't mean to hijack the thread. It's just that when you combine two of my favourite things in the whole world, food and Canada, I get excited and tend to go on and on.

    (Edited because I can't spell.)
    #12
    NYNM
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    RE: turkey soup novice 2006/11/25 22:40:04 (permalink)

    Canadian Thanksgiving food is very similar to American. We have turkey, stuffing, and mashed potatoes. Vegetables like squash, brussels sprouts, green bean casserole, sweet potatoes are popular. Unless you make your own, Ocean Spray cranberry sauce is a staple. Stuffing recipes vary by cook, of course. We don't traditionally have things like candied yams, creamed onions, oyster stuffing. Pumpkin pie with whipped cream is a MUST!

    Sorry, I didn't mean to hijack the thread. It's just that when you combine two of my favourite things in the whole world, food and Canada, I get excited and tend to go on and on.




    No problem. Check it out:
    http://www.thanksgiving-traditions.com/html/canada.html
    #13
    NYNM
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    RE: turkey soup novice 2006/11/26 20:20:19 (permalink)
    Thank you to everyone.
    I just finished putting a huge vat of turkey soup that I made yesterday into my freezer. Your suggestions were great, and, yes, the kitchen smelled wonderful. I made all little freezer baggies with different ingredients: one with brown rice, one with wild rice, one with crimini mushrooms, one with green chile, and a few just from the pot. We're set for the winter although I'm looking forward to making chicken soup from scratch now.
    #14
    CajunKing
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    RE: turkey soup novice 2006/12/04 16:36:03 (permalink)
    from my t-day turkeys i got about 6 gallons of stock.

    It got colder than a ........ (use your own image here) the other day and I made some Turkey, Veggie Rice soup for a work day at the lion's building.

    Ended up with about 5 gallons of soup, and by the time we were done, there was less than a sandwich ziplock bag left

    no leftovers for me.

    Turkey, Veggie & Rice Soup (4-5 gallons)

    2 gallons stock (my smoked turkey stock was very thick so I added the water)
    1 gallon water
    2 qt bags of left over turkey meat
    2 bags frozen corn
    1 bag frozen green beans chopped
    4 carrots sliced
    6 ribs celery sliced
    2 large onions chopped
    1 bag frozen broccoli pieces
    2 1/2 cups uncooked rice
    salt
    pepper
    sage
    bay leaf
    cayenne

    Place everything into a large stock pot

    Simmer for about 30 minutes

    adjust your seasonings

    simmer for 15-30 minutes more until veggies and rice are tender.

    Serve


    #15
    Cosmos
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    RE: turkey soup novice 2006/12/13 07:56:17 (permalink)
    Ypu did say turkeys right? I only got a gallon of stock from my 16 pounder...
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    CajunKing
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    RE: turkey soup novice 2006/12/13 14:44:55 (permalink)
    yes turkeys, we had smoked and roasted, and a spare turkey smoked.

    Don't you just hate when somebody isn't home to get their smoked turkey , just means more for the rest of us.

    #17
    NYNM
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    RE: turkey soup novice 2006/12/20 14:39:22 (permalink)
    I've been defrosting that turkey soup I made at Thanksgiving. But when I heat it up it tastes funny, sour or something. Did I do something wrong?
    #18
    CajunKing
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    RE: turkey soup novice 2006/12/20 16:04:52 (permalink)
    how did you defrost it?

    Is it a sour/spoiled taste or more of a sour/too strong taste.

    Sorry it has an off taste to it, I know you were looking forward to enjoying it this winter.

    #19
    Rusty246
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    RE: turkey soup novice 2006/12/20 16:10:52 (permalink)
    My turn....I tried this ONCE last year, my stock was a milky white color and I ditched it, I wouldn't let anyone even see it. Is this maybe because I didn't ever "skim" it? I've never had this problem with homemade chicken stock. FYI, I just dumped everything that was left in the roaster in a stock pot with S & P, celery(leaves and all) and carrots.
    #20
    PapaJoe8
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    RE: turkey soup novice 2006/12/20 16:24:03 (permalink)
    Did you taste the soup before you froze it NYNM?

    Rusty, not a clue what made things turn milky white??? Maybe it wanted to be cream of turkey soup?
    Joe
    #21
    NYNM
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    RE: turkey soup novice 2006/12/20 17:27:26 (permalink)
    The taste is sour semi-metallic. It tasted a bit better before I froze it. I didn't skim it much either. Is that the problem?
    #22
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