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Tujague's

823 Decatur St., New Orleans, LA - (504) 525-8676
Posted By Michael Stern on 4/17/2014 7:45:00 AM
One block from Jackson Square and just across the street from the French Market, Tujague’s (pronounced “Two Jacks”) has defined Creole food for a century-and-a-half. Its bill of fare is simplicity itself – a fixed-price, five-course dinner so limited in choice that there is no printed menu. The waiter tells you what there is in the way of entrees, including such choices as crawfish in cream sauce, garlic chicken bonne femme, shrimp etouffee, baked cornish hens, and filet mignon.

Every meal begins with shrimp remoulade, then soup, then a serving of brisket with spicy horseradish sauce. There is Creole salad, hot French bread, your entrée from a choice of three or four, and, of course, bread pudding for dessert (or, if you must, pecan pie). The beverages we recommend are Tujague’s brand beer and after-dinner coffee. Coffee is served in a glass, the way it has been at Tujeague’s since James Buchanan was President, the way we hope it always will be.

Just like café au lait and beignets on the other side of Decatur Street, a plate of beef brisket at Tujague’s is an essential New Orleans dining experience.

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Scorecard

3 - Overall: Excellent - Worth a Detour
Overall: Excellent - Worth a Detour
Brisket with Creole Sauce
bread pudding
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You get a choice of about four entrees.  Chicken Bonne Femme, not one of the choices, is always available to those who ask.
"You get a choice of about four entrees. Chicken Bonne Femme, not one of the choices, is always available to those who ask."
Bruce Bilmes and Susan Boyle





A culinary fixture of New Orleans since before the Civil War
"A culinary fixture of New Orleans since before the Civil War"
Michael Stern


Everyone gets shrimp remoulade as their first course.  The dish is most notable for the bright, mustardy sauce.
"Everyone gets shrimp remoulade as their first course. The dish is most notable for the bright, mustardy sauce."
Bruce Bilmes and Susan Boyle


It's not a meal in New Orleans without the local light-textured, crackle-crusted bread.
"It's not a meal in New Orleans without the local light-textured, crackle-crusted bread."
Bruce Bilmes and Susan Boyle


The second course is soup, and it varies.  This one is a chicken and sausage gumbo.
"The second course is soup, and it varies. This one is a chicken and sausage gumbo."
Bruce Bilmes and Susan Boyle


Everyone gets the third course, brisket with Creole sauce.  It's the most famous dish in the house, and some people love it and others don't see the point.  An unspoken option: you may replace the brisket with a highly regarded antipasto salad.
"Everyone gets the third course, brisket with Creole sauce. It's the most famous dish in the house, and some people love it and others don't see the point. An unspoken option: you may replace the brisket with a highly regarded antipasto salad."
Bruce Bilmes and Susan Boyle


Coffee is served the old-fashioned way, in glass tumblers.
"Coffee is served the old-fashioned way, in glass tumblers."
Bruce Bilmes and Susan Boyle


Walls are covered with signed celebrity photos and testimonials.
"Walls are covered with signed celebrity photos and testimonials."
Bruce Bilmes and Susan Boyle


The name is pronounced Two Jacks.
"The name is pronounced Two Jacks."
Bruce Bilmes and Susan Boyle


Tujague's is the second oldest restaurant in New Orleans.  Antoine's has them beat.
"Tujague's is the second oldest restaurant in New Orleans. Antoine's has them beat."
Bruce Bilmes and Susan Boyle



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